laminate and subfloor


I have a 20's home with hardwood subfloors. I've done a good bit of work on the subfloor and there are some transitions of slightly differing heights.
I'll be putting down laminate with the best pad I could find.
None of the self leveling compounds (I've talked with one of the reps tech) are recommended for hardwood, so I'm feathering some of these in with Rock Hard.
What level differences should I be worried about? I'm thinking, .1" is OK, .2" is too much.
Jeff
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Read the label for the product you are buying. .125 1/8" in 6-8 foot of span is what I recall but by memory isn't what it used to be.
--
Colbyt
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What was the question again?
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On 9/23/2010 10:59 AM, BobR wrote:

Was there a question?
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On 9/22/2010 8:52 AM, Jeff Thies wrote:

Hardwood subfloor, or a single-layer hardwood T&G floor? IOW, was what you are calling 'subfloor' ever the actual finish floor? Other than houses built by curmudgeons using wood cut on their own property, I've never seen hardwood used as a subfloor in houses of that era. Or are you calling it hardwood merely because nails you drive are coming back around and poking out at you? Old fir and pine, if kept dry, can get really really hard over the years- in this 1960 house, I have to drill pilot holes to drive nails in the studs, and burn up drill bits drilling holes for wires in the joists.
Basic thought is- if this was a finish floor at some point, covering with a plastic floor is a sin, IMHO.
-- aem sends...
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On 9/22/2010 6:42 PM, aemeijers wrote:

It's typical construction for that period I believe. Rough cut 1 bys covered with oak tongue and groove. The top is oak.
But this is a kitchen and I wasn't the first to cover it with tile. I've also ripped a good bit out that was soft and in some cases replaced the floor joists. Hence the description, a good bit of work on the subfloor. I've got plenty of hardwood elsewhere, this is not salvageable and I really wouldn't want to maintain a hardwood floor in the kitchen, the tile was bad enough.
At this point, I just want a floor again.
It's been a huge pain getting this level and flat, sort of...
3 4*8 OSB 8 2x6's and 2x8 3/8" plywood 5mm plywood Slew of custom cut shims 4 large containers of Rock Hard A lot of sanding and multi-tooling. Xylene 5 additional floor jacks
I'm ready to move on.
Jeff

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-snip-

I'm not the OP-- but I'm about to 'sin', as you say.<g>
The current floor in my 100 yr old second floor bedroom is 6" fir- that was apparently put in a little green. It has gaps between nearly every board- many are splitting, knots are falling through. I've fought with it for 25 years - filled & sanded & repaired, over and over again.
I'm about to just cover it with cushioned laminate. It is in a bedroom so very little shows anyway & I'm only awake in that room about 6 minutes a day, so I care little of how it looks- I just want to stop fussing with it.
The only thing right about the floor is that it hasn't cupped at all, so it is a flat surface. From what little I've read about laminate floors, it seems like I can just go perpendicular to the old floor and snap the new one in. Can it really be that easy?
Jim
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