JB Weld problem

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I have bought 6 JB Weld kits. (by kit, i mean the two tubes). I'm using the JB Kwik (fast dry stuff), to plug nail holes in some used corrigated roofing tin. It works great, except for some reason in all of the kits, the black comes right out of the tube, while the light gray stuff is nearly impossible to get it out. I have to literally step on the tube and put my full weight on it to get it out. On one tube I blew the bottom out of the tube.
It mixes ok and works fine, but it's such a struggle getting it out. Has anyone else run into this? I should mention the temperature has been in the 60s to 80s F. So it's according to the instructions.
Any ideas or suggestions? I'm tempted to contact the company but I wanted to ask if this is a common problem, first.
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On Aug 2, 12:41 am, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

It's normally thicker (the resin) but not THAT thick! Could it be old stock? See if they have an 800 number.
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wrote:

Sounds like you got some old product.

Call the company. They can translate the code numbers on the ends of the tubes and tell you how old the stuff is. Your next step then depends on the age of the product. If it's still within its expected shelf life, the manufacturer should replace it; if not, then you should return it to the retailer for exchange -- and make sure you get new stuff the second time around.
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On Aug 2, 1:41 am, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

Take it back. It's old. Epoxys thicken as they age.
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Properly filled epoxy formulations do not thicken with age, I have some from experimental work in the 1960's that works just fine. The hardeners are a different matter. In some cases they are polyamide based and can thicken if not formulated with neutral type fillers like silica. I have some very old Sears epoxy twin tube kits kept for emergencies, and they continue to perform quite well. In the OP case, the hardener could be the culprit, so I agree, take it back, somebody goofed.
Joe
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Joe wrote:

thick with age but the part A (resin side) may crystallize like home. Heating will restore it to normal (again like honey). I have head of folks using 28 year old epoxy. -- paul
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Now, that's a handy bit of information. Thank you, Paul.
nb
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Heating any epoxy will thin it. Warm also cures faster, not an issue for the op I imagine.
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On Tue, 3 Aug 2010 04:44:50 -0700 (PDT), jamesgangnc

You can let it cool after heating it. This heating just restores it to it's original consistency if it has crystalized. Once you heat it a little, it will stay that way for a while, even after cooling.
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On Aug 3, 8:37 am, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

I think you will find that many formulations of epoxy do thicken with age, often the hardener. The jb weld the op is using is a putty so I'm thinking it has a lot of thickeners in it already. I have experienced old epoxy thickening as well but it continued to harden fine. You can also thin it with a small amount of alcohol but that can weaken the final product. Many "wood preservatives" are simply thinned epoxy.
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On Tue, 3 Aug 2010 05:58:39 -0700 (PDT), jamesgangnc

The biggest issue with JB weld is that it is JB Weld. Epoxy that sets in 5 minutes is never going to produce the kind of result you get with real epoxy resin and hardner mixed with job specific fillers.
JB Weld is right up there with duct tape for professional results. "Handy", is it's only redeeming feature.
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On 8/3/2010 8:05 AM, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

it sounds good, but in all ACTUALITY, JB is an excellent product. The slow kind , the original, not the kwik. I've repaired, patched, glued several things over the years with it and it works great. But you have to use the original, not the kwik stuff.
s
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Steve Barker
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Well, of course not. OTOH, it's cheap, versatile, and handy, everything your "job-specific" alternative isn't.
Now, if I could only find an equivelent to the old non-mixing filled epoxy by the brand name, Liquid Steel.
nb
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JB WELD is NOT cheap! It is far more expensive than the real stuff. It's an easy sell to amateurs, though.
It isn't nearly as versatile as mixing job specific epoxy and filers, either.
I'll give you handy, if it is with the stipulation that the result is inferior.
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$5 is expensive?

Providing you have the fillers. I don't keep a lot of alum or iron filings on hand.
nb
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The fillers I use with epoxy are not metal filings. I use these:
http://www.westsystem.com/ss/fillers
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For that tiny amount of epoxy? Yes, it is OUTRAGEOUSLY expensive.

That will have to remain your problem. If you don't keep some milk on hand, you will have to eat your cornflakes dry, too. :-)
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So I buy a pt/qt of epoxy for a little fix? I imagine it would be even cheaper if I bought a railroad tank car load, too, but I'm not currently assembling a full sized aircraft.
nb
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As has been mentioned, epoxy keeps pretty much FOREVER.
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Geez ...I always forget to add, "in my lifetime!"
nb
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