J-B Weld vs. J-B Kwik

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I've been using J-B Weld for years. When I went to buy some new tubes today, I noticed the borg also carries J-B Kwik which claims a 4 minute set time, 4 hour cure.
My gut tells me that a longer set and cure time (J-B Weld - 15 hour cure) would be better/stronger, but I ain't no chemist.
Any thoughts on the matter? Is J-B Kwik just as good as J-B Weld when both have cured completely?
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I used the JB Kwik stuff, and it is as good as the JB Weld. When I want to fix something, there's no use of just not letting it sit for 24 hours. Only thing I can see is that it is a slightly different color (darker) and it sits up a little faster, which would help if you're using it in a location that is going to sag.
I'd say they both would be cured in 24 hours.
Steve
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DerbyDad03 writes:

JB "Weld" is simply epoxy and filler.
Your intuition is correct. Faster setting epoxy is weaker than slower setting, both in compressive strength and bond strength.
See the excellent downloadable manuals on epoxy products and applications:
http://www.systemthree.com /
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Thanks for the response. I am very familiar with epoxies and fillers. I have the West Systems pump setup, but I only use it when I need more than a little bit. http://www.westsystem.com /
Even with the smaller pumps, you get more than you need for most simple repairs and it's a bit more expensive. That's why I use the JB product for small fixes. I assumed the Kwik set stuff would be weaker but I just thought I'd check.
Thanks again.
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wrote:

For smaller measures of epoxy resin and hardener,you can use those oral syringes the pharmacies have for dispensing medicines.They're pretty inexpensive,use one for resin,another for hardener. I also have some small 1 oz graduated cups made for measuring medicines;they are calibrated in cc's,mL,drams,and fractions of oz.You can buy a stack of 100 for less than $10 at WalMart.They are GREAT for measuring/mixing small amounts of epoxy.I just pour in the resin to the desired amt,and the hardener on top to its required amt,and stir.
I use RAKA(similar to West),J-B Weld,and Hysol 608 epoxies. (used some tonight!)
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
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West System has a special kit that allows you to accurately mix tiny batches.
CWM
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SIMPLY EPOXY?!??! JB Weld is the substance which holds the universe together!
Well, that and duct tape.
-rev
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You are correct. The longer the cure takes, the better the bond. I won't use jbquik.
--
Steve Barker


"DerbyDad03" < snipped-for-privacy@eznet.net> wrote in message
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On Wed, 31 Jan 2007 20:59:56 -0600, "Steve Barker"

If thats the case, I want some JB Century. (Takes a Century to cure), but is stronger than God himself.
Actually I think I have some JB Century. About a year ago I mixed half JB Weld and half JB Kwik by accident. It was half hardner and half resin, but the stuff never hardened. One year later its still soft, and I even put the metal object on top of my wood furnace for awhile hoping the heat would cure it. Nothing will harden it. I had glued an air filter canister from a small engine to a piece of plumbing pipe to use as an air intake for an air compressor. Since it never hardened, I just bought a air filter made for the compressor, but just for the hell of it, I still have that old glued piece and I am waiting to see how long it takes to cure and harden. Maybe it never will.
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wrote:

probably too much hardener.Only thing to do is to scrape off the old stuff and re-do it.
--
Jim Yanik
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wrote:

Sometimes I hold things together with Ambroid Cement, which dries in less than 5 mintues (although I give it a half hour to "cure") and then put on expoxy to really hold it. I make sure there are plenty of bonding places that the Ambroid Cement** isn't touching.
**Available at hobby stores only. Comes in one tube, pretty strong but can be broken apart later if need be.
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longer curing epoxies are stronger. also,epoxies don't FULLY cure(max strength) until a couple of weeks later;the time they give for "cure" is for "can be handled"
One thing;the quick cure stuff will not have as much time to RUN(flow) as the long-cure J-B Weld.
--
Jim Yanik
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This is when i uSUALLY bring up PC-70, which seems to be a lot like JB Weld, but it doesnt' run and has to be smoothed with a wet finger. It doesn't automatically become as smooth as JB Weld does.
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wrote:

smoothing works better using rubbing alcohol on your finger.
--
Jim Yanik
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Rubbing alcohol contains OIL
CWM
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?? Not my rubbing alcohol! 70% Isopropyl Alcohol + 30% water.
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On 3 Feb 2007 07:53:02 -0600, Nobody You'd Know <> wrote:

Define "water" as used on that label. There is oil in rubbing alcohol.
CWM
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    Whatever you say. Have it your way. My PhD in Chemistry obviously carries with it no knowledge.
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Nobody You'd Know wrote:

You are right, your degree carries no knowledge about the issue. The issue is about definitions and product labels. You might want to ask Jim Yanik and others exactly what he/they call rubbing alcohol. Many people call standard 70% isopropyl alcohol "rubbing alcohol."
Standard 70 % isopropyl alcohol as bought in drug and grocery stores contains no oil (at least the label gives no indication of any oil). Just look at the ingredients on the label. If one doesn't want to believe that, then test it for oil.
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On 3 Feb 2007 11:21:01 -0600, Nobody You'd Know <> wrote:

Apparently it doesn't. Ask for your money back!
CWM
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