Island Countertop Overhang Problem

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I made a poor design choice and ordered an island/peninsula in my kitchen with a 9" overhang for use as a breakfast bar. Once the quartz countertop was installed, it was obvious that 9" was too shallow, and I should have gone for at least 12" or 13" to make it a comfortable place to eat.
So, I need some help on options. I can replace the piece of countertop for $900, which is really expensive to me, so I'm trying to think of a "workaround".
My thought is to pull the countertop forward 4" and then fill the gap with the existing 4" backsplash (of the same material), laid on the flat. However, that would create a visible seam running the entire length of the countertop (63") where the two pieces join. So I had the thought to cover the seam with a long "appliance garage" that would sit directly on top of the counter and cover the seam. But to cover the entire seam, the cabinetry would have to extend to the edge of the countertop, which is 9" beyond the edge of the base cabinets. (That nine inches comprises the overhang.) Would this look silly, or can what's above the countertop act "independently" of what's below the cabinet, design-wise?
I did a Photoshop mockup of the two design possibilities, with one showing a fictitious representation of the seam that would be visible if the cabinetry did not extend to the edge. (See the blue arrow.)
Any ideas??
http://picasaweb.google.com/gobofraggle/ApplianceGarage
(Let me know if you have trouble getting to the pics.)
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I made a poor design choice and ordered an island/peninsula in my kitchen with a 9" overhang for use as a breakfast bar. Once the quartz countertop was installed, it was obvious that 9" was too shallow, and I should have gone for at least 12" or 13" to make it a comfortable place to eat.
So, I need some help on options. I can replace the piece of countertop for $900, which is really expensive to me, so I'm trying to think of a "workaround".
My thought is to pull the countertop forward 4" and then fill the gap with the existing 4" backsplash (of the same material), laid on the flat. However, that would create a visible seam running the entire length of the countertop (63") where the two pieces join. So I had the thought to cover the seam with a long "appliance garage" that would sit directly on top of the counter and cover the seam. But to cover the entire seam, the cabinetry would have to extend to the edge of the countertop, which is 9" beyond the edge of the base cabinets. (That nine inches comprises the overhang.) Would this look silly, or can what's above the countertop act "independently" of what's below the cabinet, design-wise?
I did a Photoshop mockup of the two design possibilities, with one showing a fictitious representation of the seam that would be visible if the cabinetry did not extend to the edge. (See the blue arrow.)
Any ideas??
http://picasaweb.google.com/gobofraggle/ApplianceGarage
(Let me know if you have trouble getting to the pics.)
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Shell out the extra $$ to get it right.
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What about recreating a 45 degree angle on the countertop where it meets the laid down backsplash, just like the leading edge has? Although, I have no idea what the cost would be to recut it.
This way the only seam would be a small vertical one, close to the wall.
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On Tue 08 Jul 2008 02:19:52a, ythread told us...

I agree. But, is that a microwave for dwarfs? No way I'd ever use it sitting practically on the floor.
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The fellow that I buy granite from has been able to join and polish pieces so that even he can't ind the joint. Look carefully at having a skilled person epoxy the additional material. You may still want to slide the slab so that the joint is not unsupported, rather placed over the cabinetry.
ythread wrote:

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The problem maybe it's quartz not granite. I made the same mistake too below. The quartz apparently doesn't get as good of an edge.
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ythread wrote: ...

Elsewhere you said it was an engineered product...what, specifically, is it (brand name, product)?
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I'm not the OP. Just following the thread.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Think about supporting a one-foot overhang of marble. I'd hate to see a hunk break off. Even 9" is scary.
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I made a poor design choice and ordered an island/peninsula in my kitchen with a 9" overhang for use as a breakfast bar. Once the quartz countertop was installed, it was obvious that 9" was too shallow, and I should have gone for at least 12" or 13" to make it a comfortable place to eat.
So, I need some help on options. I can replace the piece of countertop for $900, which is really expensive to me, so I'm trying to think of a "workaround".
My thought is to pull the countertop forward 4" and then fill the gap with the existing 4" backsplash (of the same material), laid on the flat. However, that would create a visible seam running the entire length of the countertop (63") where the two pieces join. So I had the thought to cover the seam with a long "appliance garage" that would sit directly on top of the counter and cover the seam. But to cover the entire seam, the cabinetry would have to extend to the edge of the countertop, which is 9" beyond the edge of the base cabinets. (That nine inches comprises the overhang.) Would this look silly, or can what's above the countertop act "independently" of what's below the cabinet, design-wise?
I did a Photoshop mockup of the two design possibilities, with one showing a fictitious representation of the seam that would be visible if the cabinetry did not extend to the edge. (See the blue arrow.)
Any ideas??
http://picasaweb.google.com/gobofraggle/ApplianceGarage
(Let me know if you have trouble getting to the pics.)
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On Tue, 08 Jul 2008 06:42:04 -0700, gobofraggle wrote:

Not exactly sure of the logistics, but could you affix a 4-5" wide edging to the counter? It could be of the same material or wood or something else that'd fit in nicely with your look. I'm sure there are adhesives and methods for doing this. one issue may be whether the counter edge becomes susceptible to downward pressure if someone leans on it.
If it's too wide, will you still have easy and convenient access to base cabinets and what they hold?
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On Tue, 08 Jul 2008 06:42:04 -0700, gobofraggle wrote:

Just had another thought...
Remove the countertop and make a correctly sized counter of 3/4" plywood. Attach that and then attach the original countertop to it. The plywood that extends beyond the edge would give you the support you need to extent the countertop outwards. The choice of materials and design could suit your needs and decor. In the end you would end up with a counter of the desired width and a decorative border/edge. If done right, no one would notice the underlayment.
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What I'm concerned about, though, are visible seams if I were to add an additional countertop piece. Supported or unsupported, plywood or not, adding those 4" will create a seam which I would need to cover with something. So the question is, can I cover it with this "appliance garage", or would it look silly to have it extend all the way to the edge of the countertop (disregarding the measurements of the base cabinets beneath)?
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On Wed, 09 Jul 2008 06:30:59 -0700, gobofraggle wrote:
I bet if you looked long enough, you'd find a seam filler that could be blended sufficiently as to disappear.
Check with someone selling headstones or someone who works with marble on how to repair or seam.
The other choice to consider is to integrate the seam into the design and fill it with something that looks good or decorative. Then all you'd need to do is make sure the surfaces were even and smooth.
Whatever you do about the seam, both pieces should be immobilized to eliminate possibility of any movement which might weaken the patch and make things crack.
Not too fond of appliance garages or other clutter on a counter. That's your choice. Number 1 question to you: Can you live with it?
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What I'm concerned about, though, are visible seams if I were to add an additional countertop piece. Supported or unsupported, plywood or not, adding those 4" will create a seam which I would need to cover with something. So the question is, can I cover it with this "appliance garage", or would it look silly to have it extend all the way to the edge of the countertop (disregarding the measurements of the base cabinets beneath)?
======================================== After reading some of the other responses you might be able to match the seam up so the seam isn't as noticeable. Other than that I like the idea of using the counter somewhere else or selling it on craigslist too. But is sounds to me like you've already made your mind up and you want us to agree with your decision. If that is the case just do it and see how it comes out. You can change it later if you don't like it.
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Has anyone taken a look at the pictures in the link in the original post? What are your thoughts on either configuration?
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Has anyone taken a look at the pictures in the link in the original post? What are your thoughts on either configuration?
======================================== I don't like the look of the appliance garage. And I think it would look awkward if you extended it to the end of the cabinet. (I just finally understood what you were asking) Since the countertop should have a straight edge in the back why don't you get a piece of granite from the same lot and fit the 4" piece tight so the seam is less noticeable? If not you're really in a pickle. Another thing is the granite cut that thin is going to be brittle. Have you asked to see if they will cut it that narrow?
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Getting the stone is not the problem. In fact, currently, there is a 4" backsplash along that back wall, which I would lay on the flat to fill in the gap and create an extra 4" of overhang on the front. The problem is, a seam that long (63") would be visible, so I don't think a seam is an option. Hence the idea to cover it with the "appliance garage".....
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Getting the stone is not the problem. In fact, currently, there is a 4" backsplash along that back wall, which I would lay on the flat to fill in the gap and create an extra 4" of overhang on the front. The problem is, a seam that long (63") would be visible, so I don't think a seam is an option. Hence the idea to cover it with the "appliance garage".....
=============================================== I get it. I'd use the stone somewhere else and get a new counter then. Unless you can modify the counter undeneath. Another thing I just thought about. I had a breakfast bar facing a wall like that and no one used it. I think most people don't want to face a wall while they are eating. YMMV
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