Is there a better way to remove a poison oak plant than with a chainsaw?

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On Tue, 8 Jan 2013 20:20:04 +0000 (UTC), "Danny D."

You might try a sprayer intended for fruit trees; long snorkel.
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On 1/8/2013 3:02 PM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

here in phx, they spray olive trees to prevent flowering. they use what looks like truck mounted pressure sprayers with a very long hose and wand so they can reach the top of the trees some 20-40' up.
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On Tue, 08 Jan 2013 15:45:52 -0700, chaniarts

Perzactly. I've seen them used on apple trees, too.
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On Tue, 08 Jan 2013 18:01:20 -0500, krw wrote:

I like the idea of a truck mounted sprayer.
But there will still be tons of poison oak in the inaccessible places like this one I snapped just today about 100 feet below where the pictures were taken yesterday.

I don't think a truck can get down there, unfortunately.
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I wonder if a backpack sprayer would do the job? http://www.harborfreight.com/4-gallon-backpack-sprayer-65040.html
Less efficient, but a pressurized water fire extinguisher has some range.
http://lib.store.yahoo.net/lib/fireadesource/amerex-240.jpg
I've owned several of these, over the years. 20 foot horizontal range is possible.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .

here in phx, they spray olive trees to prevent flowering. they use what looks like truck mounted pressure sprayers with a very long hose and wand so they can reach the top of the trees some 20-40' up.
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http://www.guidrynews.com/story.aspx?id 00005595 I bought such a Nomad sprayer on Ebay, for cleaning jobs away from home. Worked reasonably well. I also used it to pump pink antifreeze into RV water systems.
Might apply Roundup mix to these poison oaks. Ten foot hose. I remember I was able to stand on the ground, and spray water on top of my mobile home. Kind of fun.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
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On Tue, 08 Jan 2013 15:45:52 -0700, chaniarts wrote:

The truck-mounted sprayer 'might' work on the curbside plant, if I could afford it - but - look at this picture to see the magnitude of the problem I face.

There is just no way a truck is going to get down there!
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I had never been sensitive to poison ivy.
But i had a pine tree fall into my yard, and when I cut it up i got a massive exposure. I had moved from Wisconsin where it grew in low bushes, and did not recognize the hairy vines common in Virginia.
That reaction wasn't too bad, but the exposure sensitized me, and Wow! next time I got close to some I needed medical attention.
Sooner or later I think your efforts are likely to have the same effect.
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On Tue, 08 Jan 2013 18:29:51 -0800, TimR wrote:

Nobody is immune to cell mediated immunity.
I was sensitized to poison ivy way long ago as a kid. I get it as badly as anyone does.
Now that I'm in California, it's poison oak. But it still itches like crazy.
When I get it on my skin, and I don't wash it off, I am red and yellow blisters and itching for weeks on end. Just like you are.
The problem is exacerbated when you see how much oil is in a single plant! Look at this video, for example, of a 3-inch thick vine I cut today.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qYcJslc6ymE

That's enough urushiol right there to poison every single human on the planet! Talk about biological warfare!
PS: My camera is soaked in the stuff. I don't know how to clean it yet.
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On 01-09-2013 00:04, Danny D. wrote:

Or as my four-year-old sister said, "There's no such thing of that, 'cause I never heard of it!"
They said no one is immune to smallpox--your lack of scar PROVES you were never vaccinated. So they did it again.
Two years later, same argument, same result.
My sensitivity to poison oak DEcreased from 1967 to 1972. Don't know why, but I've posted my hypothesis already.
--
Wes Groleau

Don't get even — get odd!
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That reminds me of my experience. I grew up in southern California and never had much exposure to poison oak. I could recognize and avoid it, but if I ever contacted it I never had a reaction.
After I moved to New England, I discovered lots of mature poison ivy vines entwining all the trees in my back yard. I was determined to get rid of them, and since I thought I wasn't allergic to it, I figured it wouldn't be much of a problem.
The first summer I wore minimal protection, just gloves and long sleeve shirt, and I ripped most of it out by hand. I didn't have any reaction. It came back next summer, though not as much, and encouraged by my previous experience I did it the same way. No reaction. The third year I did it again... and came down with raging rashes on my wrists, ankles, belt line. A little on my forehead and back of my neck. Ever since then I've been VERY sensitive - I'm careful to avoid the stuff, but I sometimes get the familiar rash anyway. It's very common around here, and I guess I touch just a little bit of it, or I touch something else that's touched it. Or, maybe it's from just looking at it.
I'm now also sensitive to poison oak, and have gotten a few cases of it when I've gone back to California.
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On Wed, 09 Jan 2013 01:17:40 -0500, Nil wrote:

When I first bought the property I live at, which is covered in Pacific Poison Oak, I researched the Internet for weeks, trying to assess my enemy. (Never underestimate your enemy when it's poison oak!)
One thing I learned is that the delayed cell mediated immune response to urushiol is such that NOBODY is ever (truly) immune.
Sure, you might not get the rash this time. Maybe not next time. Maybe not the next. Or the next after that. But, the physiology of the body's immune response is such that everyone 'can' get it at any time after the first exposure. Which is exactly what you found out! :)
What I do, by the way, after a severe exposure, is, instead of buying the expensive IvyBlock/Technu/Zanfel/Prednisole regimen, is the following:

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On Wed, 9 Jan 2013 06:44:40 +0000 (UTC), "Danny D."

Yes, which is why I never play with poison ivy. One summer I had the kid clean up some vines in the back yard. Nothing I hadn't done but I didn't recognize the PI, either. I have never had a reaction to PI, though I've never been one to tempt fate. He got a little rash but my wife just touched his clothes, taking them from the floor and putting them directly in the washer, came down with blister from head to toe. She was one hurtin' pup for weeks.
Some time later I hired a handyman to cut down a tree by the road. We knew it was loaded with PI, but he said it didn't bother him. Well maybe it never had, but it sure did that time. He was in the emergency room shortly after. Did I say that *I* didn't play with the stuff. ;-)
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On Wed, 09 Jan 2013 11:36:52 -0500, krw wrote:

I don't mind battling poisonous plants any more than I mind winding torsion springs, but, I do try to know thine enemy thoroughly, and one problem I have in spades is decontamination of something invisible, yet toxic.
To that end, I was just made aware of the most fantastic reliable reference on the net for battling toxic Pacific Poison Oak in the field!
United States Patent 4,594,239, to Pluim, Jr., on June 10, 1986 Titled: Method for neutralizing offensive chemicals http://tinyurl.com/ah7myn3
Summary: Urushiol causes dermatitis by changing the surface proteins in the skin so the body no longer recognizes the skin as human, and attacks it.
That effect is actually fairly easy to interfere with. Pretty much any change to the urushiol molecule would probably prevent dermatitis.
Chlorine bleach is a strong oxidizing agent, and should easily do the trick. Getting it into the oil would be aided by adding alcohol or acetone as a wetting agent, but a strong surfactant should also work.
The patent prefers a solution of acetone + butyl acetate + trichloroisocyanuric acid for neutralizing urushiol on skin, clothes, and equipment; but if I preferentially select just the common household chemicals discussed, the patent seems says that 2% to 6% common bleach alone or combined with 5% to 20% rubbing alcohol (or acetone) as a wetting agent will neutralize urushiol in about 1 minute.
The patent even explains how adding certain ferrous compounds will actually make the toxic urushiol glow green, while the decontaminated urushiol will not.
Armed with this information, I can create a decontamination mix out of the prescribed pool chemicals and rubbing alcohol, which I can use to wash my face, hands, neck, ears, and wrists every 15 minutes, while removing the poison oak in the field!
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Danny D. wrote:

What is butyl acetate and where would you get it?
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I thought you were going to spray it on the plants.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
United States Patent 4,594,239, to Pluim, Jr., on June 10, 1986 Titled: Method for neutralizing offensive chemicals http://tinyurl.com/ah7myn3
Summary: Urushiol causes dermatitis by changing the surface proteins in the skin so the body no longer recognizes the skin as human, and attacks it.
That effect is actually fairly easy to interfere with. Pretty much any change to the urushiol molecule would probably prevent dermatitis.
Chlorine bleach is a strong oxidizing agent, and should easily do the trick. Getting it into the oil would be aided by adding alcohol or acetone as a wetting agent, but a strong surfactant should also work.
The patent prefers a solution of acetone + butyl acetate + trichloroisocyanuric acid for neutralizing urushiol on skin, clothes, and equipment; but if I preferentially select just the common household chemicals discussed, the patent seems says that 2% to 6% common bleach alone or combined with 5% to 20% rubbing alcohol (or acetone) as a wetting agent will neutralize urushiol in about 1 minute.
The patent even explains how adding certain ferrous compounds will actually make the toxic urushiol glow green, while the decontaminated urushiol will not.
Armed with this information, I can create a decontamination mix out of the prescribed pool chemicals and rubbing alcohol, which I can use to wash my face, hands, neck, ears, and wrists every 15 minutes, while removing the poison oak in the field!
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after thinking about this for awhile.......
the plants didnt get so large overnite. do you REALLY need access to that land. this is one case where it might be better to just avoid the area and ignore it.
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On Thu, 10 Jan 2013 15:57:50 -0800, bob haller wrote:

Nope. That's the whole point. I don't have to clean up any of this poison oak. So, I can take my time.
Basically, when I get in the mood for a good fight, I head down to the ravine for battle. It's really more of a hobby to figure out how to defeat the poison oak, to beat it at its own game - and not get rashed in the process.
It has been a tough battle - but I've learned a lot in just the past few days, so, eventually, I'll know the secret.
Today I talked to a pharmacist. I must have gotten a bad apple because she kept telling me it's for women and that it won't work on the skin and that it wasn't an "approved purpose".
I need to find a pharmacist who can actually think out of the box. (It doesn't seem to be their specialty as all they do is follow the rules.)
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On 01-10-2013 23:08, Danny D. wrote:

I once argued for five minutes with a pharmacist who didn't want to fill my prescription for four 85 cc doses of Lovenox. "Only comes in fifty and a hundred." I finally convinced him I am capable of squirting fifteen CC into the sink.
--
Wes Groleau

In any formula, constants (especially those obtained
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I have a similar "while I have the time" project. I collect rocks out of a farmer's field, and fill mudholes with them. One I've been working on, is where the utility guys pull off the road to do phone wiring. The mudhole is probably four by 10 feet or so. I've put in a bunch of buckets of rocks, and I'm falling behind. The mudhole is still there.
A few years back, I used buckets of rock to fill the sink holes at my church, next to the storm drain.
Farmers are better off without the rocks, and the rest of the world is better off without the sink holes. I only harvest rocks between crops, won't walk on shoots or harvestable crops.
I also am not all that impressed with "in the box" thinkers.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Nope. That's the whole point. I don't have to clean up any of this poison oak. So, I can take my time.
Basically, when I get in the mood for a good fight, I head down to the ravine for battle. It's really more of a hobby to figure out how to defeat the poison oak, to beat it at its own game - and not get rashed in the process.
It has been a tough battle - but I've learned a lot in just the past few days, so, eventually, I'll know the secret.
Today I talked to a pharmacist. I must have gotten a bad apple because she kept telling me it's for women and that it won't work on the skin and that it wasn't an "approved purpose".
I need to find a pharmacist who can actually think out of the box. (It doesn't seem to be their specialty as all they do is follow the rules.)
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