Invasion of the red ants

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LOL...worst trapped animal I have handled was a gopher tortoise that moved from my yard to a county park :o)
When we used our pop-top camper the last time, we forgot there was food stored. The remarkable colony of roaches that moved in were able to chew through the wrappers on Ritz crackers. Also chewed up the soles of my rubber flip flops....can't imagine them being mistaken or used as food :o)
We had a colony of roaches move into our place when upstairs neighbor moved out...they had small children, so probably easier food sources for the bugs.
I've read about mixing baits for carpenter ants, using sugar and boric acid. Those articles said that the b.a. must be liquid, they will not ingest granules.
When topical flea treatment for cats came out, we got it right away. The vet advised sprinkling b.a. all over the carpet, leave for few days and then vacuum up to get rid of eggs. Had tried everything prior to that...powder, shampoo, dips, foggers...the topical stuff got rid of the flea problem within days, so didn't use the b.a.
I rescued some antiques from a condemned house years ago...old ladies, plumbing didn't work, pet cats, trash stuffed into kitchen cabinets. I could hear the roaches running around on the piles of trash. I came prepared...boots, gloves, rake, shovel :o) As soon as I got the furniture outside, I poured full strength bleach all over it. Nice pie safe and walnut table :o) Cheap way to furnish a home :o)
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On Thu, 24 Jun 2010 12:16:48 -0400, " snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net"

I am surprised (s)he didn't back. It must have been pretty far away. I have several living around here and the FPL easement behind me is a tortoise sanctuary with 35-40 there at any given time. We have a few with distinctive shell marking that we named. There is one big female (Roberta was Bob before I knew how to tell) that has lived here for the 28 years I have been here. One of my neighbors did try to move her once, about half mile away up to the state park. She was back in less than a week. We have had babies several times and watched them grow up.
BTW, trick to catch a tortoise. Bury a white bucket right outside the burrow at a 45 degree angle opposite the hole angle. They fall in the bucket and you move them. Just check the bucket frequently so it doesn't starve and die. It is illegal to kill one. If one starts a hole in a place you don't want them, throw a couple big rocks, pieces of concrete or bricks in the hole,. They think they hit bedrock and abandon the dig.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Don't use your real name if you say you moved a g. tortoise :o) It's illegal. Our tortoise moved about 5 miles, so I didn't expect to see it again. There is a "trick" to catching a tortoise, other than walking up to the thing and picking it up? :o) I picked it up, put it into a big cooking pot and carried him in that ... he was royally p.o.'d! I would not have considered moving him but that he was digging right next to the front door and I wanted to sell the house. O/wise, I loved having all the critters around. I miss them.
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On Thu, 24 Jun 2010 14:39:20 -0400, " snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net"

That was a prime candidate for the rock trick. If you catch them early in the burrowing process, throw a few big rocks in the hole and they will stop digging there.
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have
We're
other
You have problems with animals that I've never even heard of! (Reminds me of the old saying: She had curves in places where other women didn't even HAVE places.)

If those FF's were from China, who knows what was in them. Melamine and pet food? Blood thinner? Poisoned milk? Recycled executed political prisoners?

Once roaches get established in multi-family dwellings, they really get a foothold. Often treatment just causes them to flee to the least fumigated part of the building where they "hole up" until the poison fades away.

I guess not. This was in the '70s when the boric acid technique first gained wide dispersion and there wasn't an internet nor a whole lot of information about exactly how to apply it. Worst experience ever? Trying to syphon out a clogged sink by sucking on a rubber tube that had a roach crawling inside it. Ptui!!! Lesson learned: blow before you suck!

It's a *very* creepy noise. I took an apartment over Gepetto's restaurant in DC once and I head something under the bed. Ever see the scene in Aliens where Bill Paxton pokes his head into the ceiling tiles? I saw this huge, old dirt brown cockroach waddling its way along under the bed not even bothering to run for it. I moved out the next day and my landlord let me break the lease when I told him why. Turned out to be an illegal apartment so I am sure he didn't want any trouble with the health department. Never ate at Gepetto's after that because I assumed that's where King Roach held court.

I left a lot of stuff behind when I moved from the NYC apartment because they lay eggs everywhere. Inside stereos, in collections of papers, inside record albums (remember those?), inside TV's, shoes, clothes and boxes of any kind. I'd bring a flamethrower to the scene you described. God, how I hated those little f*ckers. Especially if one crawled into the bed at night.
-- Bobby G.
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clipped

It was winter, so the roaches were pretty slow...had my pants tied shut around my ankles so's no roaches would be tempted to run for cover. I was young and foolish, still furnishing my home and got some real bargains that day :o) Farm auctions were more fun :o)
I had heard about these ladies from a doctor who cared for them. His complaint was that they never bathed....they had a houseful of cats and the cats used the bathtub. Owner told me they used buckets for toilets and tossed it out the window :o) I would not have bothered with the furniture if it had not been really good stuff...painted, so I covered it with bleach before I put it in my car. Made a final check of the house before departing, along with my brave and loyal friend who had dibs on the table. At the top of the basement stairs there was a pile of stuff and what first looked like an antique teddy bear ... not a teddy bear but a dead cat!!!!!
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<stuff snipped>

Gack! I couldn't have lived with that furniture. Ever see the Macolm in the Middle where Hal, after finding an antique chest, opens it and says "Who would hang all these bowties upside down like that?" Yes, it ws BATS!
I'm flashing on an old cartoon where all the furniture in a room is shivering in fear. Was that Beauty and the Beast? That's what I would see looking at furniture that has "lived" through the experience you described.
That said, I rescued an incredibly stinky 12 by 6 deep rubber mat from a restaurant to use in my darkroom. Took me two days, the bright sun, a toilet brush and a bucket of Mr. Clean triple strength to even put a dent in the stink. But it was soooo comfortable to stand on for hours at a time it was worth it. Truth is, I am never happier than when I am rescuing some item that still has useful life in it. And a few that don't. (-;
-- Bobby G.
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Robert Green wrote:

The owner of the condemned house was a work buddy who lived next to the condemned house. He kept me up on the blow-by-blow struggle to get the elderly ladies out (to a nursing home) and condemn the house. Finally, he came by a couple of days before demo was scheduled. Being a dedicated antiquer, I knew there would be "stuff" left behind; I was also interested in whatever old light fixtures or whatever might be there. He said "There is just an old built-in cabinet with holes in the doors." What else? "Oh, an old table." A cabinet with holes in the doors is a pie safe; it had many coats of paint and was "built in" in an alcove off the kitchen with molding around it. Because of the trash, it had not been opened for years and years...the trash was knee deep. I just had to rake away the trash, pry off the molding and haul it out. It was entirely covered with paint, so there was no nasty stuff that could have soaked into the wood. Most old pie safes with punched tin doors are trash because they get stored in barns and the tin rusts away. Mine was perfectly preserved :o) The black walnut table was a little dirty, and full strength bleach didn't harm the wood at all.
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On Thu, 24 Jun 2010 12:16:48 -0400, " snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net"

(I know a FL tortoise.. "Gopher")
In Nevada, we have Mojave Max. He became the Spokestortoise in 1995.
http://www.mojavemax.com/default.html
We even have an adoption program. Follow the rules and have a desert tortoise for generations. You can only have 'em under the adoption rules.
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On Thu, 24 Jun 2010 11:25:43 -0400, "Robert Green"

As I mentioned above, BA burns the exoskeleton. It takes some time. I dusted my garage before. A day or few later the critters are belly-up.
For roaches? See the Las Vegas Coffee Grounds Roach Trap - version 2
http://www.lasvegasmixx.com/702/viewtopic.php?id 02
I still use the original type, mason jar with used coffee grounds and an inch or so of water. They climb in and cannot climb out (glass).
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wrote:

the
through
Thank God roaches are just a bad memory for me. It's good to be reminded that there are lots of small things to be thankful in this world, and living roach-free is one of them.
-- Bobby G.
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wrote:

the
through
Thank God when I moved south, the roaches stayed in NYC. Must have had a multi-year contract.
Thanks for your input!
-- Bobby G.
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ants.
"Clyde, dem's not sprinkles!"
-- Bobby G.
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On Thu, 24 Jun 2010 10:17:57 -0400, Robert Green wrote:

I've eaten choc covered ants. Pretty crunchy.
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<stuff snipped>

And cereal. Even when the inner bag is rolled and clipped. In the summer, cereal goes into tupperware containers. That's because one day, in my haste to have breakfast, I didn't notice a few in the cereal bowl and ate some. Very unique and bitter taste. Had a bad infestation this year, but Raid Ant spikes spread around the house seem to have done the trick. Green with what look like white radardomes on the top. (The spikes, not the ants, otherwise I'd be moving right quick!)
Took a week for them to work, but the kitchen's been sugar ant free. Now how do I stop tiger crickets from getting into the basement? I think they are entering through the sump pit under the stairs but the few that I've captured and subjected to enhanced interrogation techniques have not revealed their point of entry. (-:
-- Bobby G.
"The United States Does Not Torture!" - GW Bush. (We have people that do it for us!)
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Wilfred Xavier Pickles wrote:

I've never heard of a product that repels ants, and the best way is to remove food/water sources. The best all-around product I have used for ants is bait composed of sugar and boric acid...there are lots of brand names and it takes only small amounts. If there is a particular entry point, leave bait next to the trail. Whether up north or in Florida, they seem most invasive in the spring....usually gone in a day or two. Storing sweets or greasy stuff openly is an invitation to ants and when the ants come in it's usally a reminder to do a thorough cleaning...greasy stove, spills, crumbs, pet food available, etc.
I would never use an all-over insecticide to try to eradicate ants from a yard...they have beneficial purposes outdoors and they belong there.
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I have good luck with Amdro, but that's me and that's here. May not where you are. It is spendy. Finally got the wife to quit using it like powdered sugar after she went and bought some. "You know what this stuff costs?", she asked. "Yeah, why do you think I've been telling you to use the small holes in the shaker instead of the one BIG one?" A few grains per hill, but like you said, new ones just move in. Isn't the ant thing seasonal, with them starting new colonies at certain times of the year, or do they do that all the time. If they do it seasonally, hit them good right before they lay eggs, and get the whole colony. You might not clear up Missouri, but you might clean up your little part of the universe.
HTH
Steve
visit my blog at http://cabgbypasssurgery.com watch for the book
A fool shows his annoyance at once, but a prudent man overlooks an insult.
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On Tue, 22 Jun 2010 15:51:43 -0700, "Steve B"

That may be part of our problem here. We have a 12 month season. There is no dormant period so things evolve faster here. I actually got rid of all my fire ants quite a while ago and white foot ants moved in. They are particularly nasty since they can throw multiple queens and other things that makes killing the colony harder. They also figured out we have ants that will take in workers from other colonies when their queen dies. When you add that to ants that maintain a couple different food streams and abandon one if it starts killing them you can see why baits are a tough thing to make in any quantity and expect it to keep working. Baits are certainly the way to go but if the ants start adapting, be ready to change the bait.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I don't think it is as much a matter of tolerace to the bait/insecticide as a balance between different insects that are predators...termites and carpenter ants seem to alternate (studying our palm trees :o) and fire ants feed on lots of other larvae. Carpenter ants and fire ants both seem to nest under pavement...dryer? Gopher crickets eat anything and everything :o) My husband and I spent about two years full-time rehabbing our condo sprinkler system and lawn. It was bloody awful until we discovered Amdro....you can have a swarm of fire ants on you and you don't feel it until they begin to bite in unison. I once knelt on a mound and moved might fast when I felt a bite ... had over 100 bites on my leg. I did nature photography when I first moved to Florida and it seemed to be a perfect viewpoint when I had my tripod right on top of a f.a. mound....ouch!
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On Tue, 22 Jun 2010 20:39:19 -0400, " snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net"

The trick with fire ants is not to hurt them. Jump in the pool or gently try to knock them off. If you crush one and he releases his pheromone, the rest immediately bite.
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