Insuring a vacant house

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I just bought a house that I plan to rehab then resell and it will be vacant for a while. When I called my insurance (State Farm) they said they don't insure vacant houses. Other places do, such as Nationwide or Norris & Assoc. Prepare for sticker shock, as it runs about $1200/yr for vacant vs $250/yr for occupied. I found a friend who is willing to house-sit for me so I get the cheaper rate, but it sounds like that won't work in your situation. This is in Ohio, btw.
Bottom line: the house can be insured, just keep calling places until you find someone who will do it.

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On 15 Dec 2005 08:01:16 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Yoe dood..... Give yo keys to da ganger bangers in da hood. Dis be a fukkin good drug n partee pad fo us to have sum fun. I be da man to bee sure yo house is safe an no doods fuk wid it. Yo gots yoself a deal bro.
Marco
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On 15 Dec 2005 08:01:16 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

=========Ran into the same problem when my Father passed away... they would no longer insure the vacant house .... Solved the problem by giving the key to a niece (adult, married, trustworthy, etc)... and charging her rent ( like a buck) ...
Honest that is all the insurance company required...for the house to be ...considered "occupied"... ???? BTW she never stayed in the house... But did live within 10 minutes of it...
Bob G.
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FWIW, don't empty it. Go to Goodwill and buy some old useless furniture and put it in there. Leave the power on and put some lights on timers. Have the neighbors park their cars in the driveway occasionly.
No one will insure an empty house.
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On Thu, 15 Dec 2005 18:02:47 -0500, "HeatMan"

I had an uncle that died, and a few months later my aunt went into a nursing home. The house was vacant. My mother being the only remaining relative was given power of attorney. She ran into a similar problem, except the insurance company was not notified at that point yet. When the insurance was due, my mothers lawyer told her that there could be a problem if the ins company found out. She suggested renting it to someone. Mom got all nervous and said the renters will wreck the place and etc etc etc...
I lived too far away to directly help, but I went to visit mom and I had to go to that house to do a few repairs, plus I was given the refrigerator, washer and dryer. While I was there, I solved the problem. The next door neighbor came over while I was there and asked if he could park one of his cars on the driveway, because he had too many cars for his driveway (was trying to sell one of them), and was always getting parking tickets on the street. I told him that I'd discuss it with the family. I talked to the lawyer and we agreed to charge the guy $10 a month for the driveway parking. (less than half the cost of one parking ticket).
At the same time a few of the younger relatives in their 20's were hired by mom and aunt to clean the house and get rid of most of the furniture and stuff. They were being paid to do the cleaning, plus made a small fortune selling all the antiques to antique shops. But the lawyer wrote up a lease, in which they were renting the property in trade for cleaning. They did sleep there one or two nights, but most of the time they were just there cleaning and hauling stuff out. Timers were also put on lights.
In the end, everyone was happy. The youngsters were making money, the neighbor was not getting tickets, the legalities were worked out for the insurance, and my mother could sleep again. (and I almost forgot, the lawyer made a couple hundred too).
In other words, RENT the place to someone you know for a small amount, (you can reimburse them too if you want). Make it a legal rental lease, use a lawyer if needed, and you should be all set. I think I'd still find another ins. company though.
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this was back around 1991, but may work for your situation.
neighbors moved from Louisiana to Georgia, and house was vacant
they paid my brother to "live there", and occupy the house
they kept utilities and phone on, we just changed the phone number to his name
real estate agent loved the idea, he just rolled up his sleeping bag and stashed it in the utility room for open house.
and it was convenient for real estate lady to have access to a phone when she was doing open houses.
house was right next door to us, and was nice to have extra room when we had out of town company..... call furniture rental place, and had them a nice bedroom setup for 2 weeks, saving hotel expenses.
lady that bought the house is still there... her hubby got sent packing sooon after they moved in
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There are lots of impoverished but responsible graduate students with and without families that need a cheap place to live while they are writing their dissertation in linguistics or literature or the granulated peruvian treeleaf or whatever research project. Maybe contact a nearby university for a list of candidates and have them apply, these are scholars, not frat party animals in undergraduate schools. You will safekeep your house and help the knowledge base of mankind too. Ask for and check references.-Jitney
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