Insulating tub/shower cavity

I have a new Ryland Home that I having a noise issue with the shower/tub within my master bath. The tub/shower combo is partly on a wall that faces a large open area that is open to the level below. So when the shower is on it can be heard through out the entire house. If you are watching TV in the living space below it is so loud it requires turning up the volume when the shower is in use. Not surprisingly, we have a fiberglass shower/tub surround so I am assuming the water hitting the bottom of the tub is echoing in the large area between the floor and the surround. I don't believe it is the plumbling noise issue as almost all of the plumbing runs in the house are made with some sort of plastic tubing. I would like to remedy this by insulating this open area between the surround and the floor but am curious what insulation to use? Should I use similar fiberglass insulation used to insulate the exterior of my home, or should a try to cut foam panels and try to fit them between the studs of the outfacing wall via the access panel used to access the back of the tub/shower plumbing fixtures? I am concerned about using foam (in a can) as it may expand and crack the drywall or tub surround or is that my only option?
Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
TIA.
- MW
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MikeWazowski wrote:

You'll be disappointed with the performance of fiberglass I think. Sound-deadening is a complex/difficult issue. Some info here:
http://www.soundproofing.org% snipped-for-privacy@soundproofing.org/sales/prices.html
Jim
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Frequently, the water from above comes into the main drain by way of a "T". So one of the noises ends up being that water coming down from above and striking the inner face of the drain, often a 3 or 4 inch line. Just something like that can account for a lot of noise. So if you're ever doing a plumbing redo, it's nicer to come down at an angle, and the transition in from the side so there's no flow striking the inner surface. Which I'll bet is accounting for some of your noise when the water drains during a shower.

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On 4 Dec 2003 11:55:49 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (MikeWazowski) wrote:

You really don't want to add any type of hard foam. It will transmit the sound, not deaden it.
BB
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<< should I try to cut foam panels and try to fit them between the studs of the outfacing wall via the access panel used to access the back of the tub/shower plumbing fixtures? >>
That's by far your best option. Urethane foam is a dandy sound deadening material. To prove it, hold a foam cushion in front of a high output speaker and note how much the sound is attenuated. Rubber based foams are not as effective. Urethanes are commonly used for automotive sound deadening where minimal weight is also required. HTH
Joe
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