Installing Manual Transfer Switch/Generator Advice

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wrote:

Well reasoned, trader, and I appreciate it! Thanks.
Here comes my dilemma. I think I can do this plug thing safely, as I described in another branch of this thread. If it is done that way, it could be easily brought back to current conditions, which I think are fully in compliance with code. Since I do not plan on selling this house - that'll be a job for my heirs - should I care about a condition that is not code-compliant but also not unsafe?
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Best regards
Han
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Wiring an inlet into the panel and installing a new cover or Interlockit isn't much more work or difficulty. Unless you have an old panel, etc where you can't get an Interlockit kit or new panel cover. Or the panel doesn't have room for a new breaker, etc.
Whether you care about something being code compliant or not is up to you. I'm sure you've seen plenty of people here saying they have a cord and plug on their furnace. And I'll bet they are done in a variety of ways. From safe, to wires dangling on heated pipes. And whether it's code compliant or not you won't know unless you ask the inspector. Speaking of code compliant, you are also supposed to pull an electrical permit for changing the furnace wiring. If you do that, you'll find out for sure....
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wrote:

Oops ...
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Best regards
Han
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On 11/10/2012 8:34 AM, Han wrote:

...
I wouldn't assume that to be necessary for single-residence homeowner, either...most places, even the strict ones, have variances for the owner-resident when isn't rental or multi-unit, etc.
The local office that handles such can certainly tell you, indeed, and there's more than likely a web site that has the applicable information that you can find for the actual jurisdiction in charge.
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ine.net>  wrote in

I'm not exactly assuming, I live in NJ too. The case here where you would not need a permit is if you are doing "repairs". Any new wiring, changing wiring, etc, which is what he is actually doing, requires a permit, even if it's your own house and you live in it.
To put in a furnace here requires 3 permits, together with all the fees, again something you might not see in a lot places. But then this is the Peoples Republic here....

Yes, he should go check further if he wants to be absolutley sure and comply. And clearly a lot of people are doing a lot of work themselves without getting permits.
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On 11/10/2012 10:55 AM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote: ...
...[description of onerous permitting reqm'ts elided for brevity]...

When such extreme silliness as I saw online when I just looked is the rule, the obvious result is that people will break the rules.
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On 11/10/2012 12:47 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Still a problem.

I doubt many inspectors would allow that reasoning. But an inspector doesn't have to. They can use the AHJ discretion allowed below.

My mental picture is a much longer cord replacing the wiring from the furnace to a ceiling or wall.

It can be done in a code compliant manner. Use a double pole switch to switch between the branch circuit and an inlet. Not that hard to do yourself.
Art Todesco found a commercial unit that is 15A 120V http://www.reliancecontrols.com/ProductDetail.aspx?CSR302
RBM found one that is 230V, 30A. http://www.wayfair.com/Reliance-Controls-Easy-Tran-Transfer-Switch-TF151-RLC1017.html?refid=FR49-RLC1017
In the event that I needed to connect my furnace to a generator I would disconnect the branch circuit at the furnace and kludge a cord there. If I had frequent outages I would use a switch/inlet, or a panel-cover interlock.
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If he's going to re-wire the furnace to a double pole swich and inlet he might as well just do the panel interlock anyway, regardless of how oftern the power goes out. Not much difference in my book, except that at the panel, you get to power whatever you choose in the house, not just the furnace. Only drawback is a little more cost for the interlock and breaker vs a double pole switch.
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<snip>

I really appreciate the advice, and I will talk to a licensed electrician before I go any further. I have done electrical work in my basement, such as adding circuits for my workshop. I did not get any permits thinking that similar to Nassau County, LI, I could do them myself as long as I did them right.
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Best regards
Han
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On Sat, 10 Nov 2012 08:46:59 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

It seems like a lot of work to end up with the same 110.3(B) violation.
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wrote:

Thank you, thank you!! That is the type of switch I wanted all along. I did the kludge of disconnecting the circuit at junction box 1, and attaching a cord with the wirenuts there. Not sure I really want to do that in a dark basement and then also starting a generator. I have put aside on my Amazon wishlist a 120V version: <http://tinyurl.com/a8b7do4 <(Amazon.com product link shortened)- Generators/dp/B000HRWG8U/>
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Best regards
Han
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wrote:

"Basis of", WHERE THERE ARE CODES. It's not just rubber stamped.
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On Friday, November 2, 2012 8:51:16 PM UTC-4, noname wrote:

Originally, the power line from the furnace went to a junction box on a joist above the furnace, where it joined a house current line from the breaker box. I disconnected that junction in the box and connected the house current line from the breaker box to a plug outlet which I mounted in the box. I then put a plug on the line from the furnace and plugged it into the outlet in the junction box.
When the power goes out, I unplug the furnace line from the house current box and plug it into a line coming from the generator. I did the same with the well pump and the water heater.
Paul
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There is a certain simplicity, here. I like it. Line from generator. Would that be extension cord, or a power inlet, and bit of Romex? It might be possible to put the generator out in the barn. Run some UF to the house, and put a "powered by generator" socket next the furnace plug.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Originally, the power line from the furnace went to a junction box on a joist above the furnace, where it joined a house current line from the breaker box. I disconnected that junction in the box and connected the house current line from the breaker box to a plug outlet which I mounted in the box. I then put a plug on the line from the furnace and plugged it into the outlet in the junction box.
When the power goes out, I unplug the furnace line from the house current box and plug it into a line coming from the generator. I did the same with the well pump and the water heater.
Paul
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I ran Romex from the generator to the furnace, with a plug at the furnace end of the line. Unplug from house current, plug into generator line.
Paul
On Saturday, November 3, 2012 11:19:20 AM UTC-4, Stormin Mormon wrote:

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I think I could wire a plug for my furnace. As it is, from the breaker, goes to box on furnace, then hardwired to furnace circuit.
Really, thought about turning breaker off, then run reverse plug from generator to box....
Greg
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Back feeding power into a circuit can be dangerous. Only if you are skilled and safe with electricity would you do any wiring. I am not suggesting, or reccomending anyone do any wiring.
In theory, one could unwire the furnace from the house power, and insulate the house power wires. Connect the furnace wires to a cord and plug harvested from a three wire appliance that's being thrown out. When the power comes back, rewire the furnace to the breaker panel, and put it all back like you found it. The furnace gets powered, and much lower chance of back feeding, and killing a lineman.
You will need a bit of electrical knowledge, wire nuts, electric tape, safe working habits. Note, that I didn't provide step by step coaching. If you don't know the details, call an electrician or a friend who does. Remember, the utility power can come back on at any second, and ignorant people can be killed from electricity.
I installed furnaces for six years, and have worked with electricity for 30 years. It still scares me, and I double and triple check safety. Act with wisdom, and at your own risk.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
I think I could wire a plug for my furnace. As it is, from the breaker, goes to box on furnace, then hardwired to furnace circuit.
Really, thought about turning breaker off, then run reverse plug from generator to box....
Greg
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There is only one breaker to the furnace. This means killing that breaker I could manually wire up the furnace without fear of feed back, right?
On Saturday, November 3, 2012 7:15:18 AM UTC-4, Stormin Mormon wrote:

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One feature of the transfer switch, it's supposed to be "oops, I forgot" proof. I think it's a very bad ass/u/me for you to rely on remembering to flip a breaker. When the power is out, and you're cold, it's too easy to forget things. This, I know from experience.
Please, please. Make it as "oops, I forgot" proof as possible.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
There is only one breaker to the furnace. This means killing that breaker I could manually wire up the furnace without fear of feed back, right?
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On 11/3/2012 9:21 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Here is the proper/safe way to do it:
http://www.electricenergyonline.com/?page=show_news&id8786
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