Installing insulation

Our house has a mostly-finished basement, one notable exception being the laundry room, which has uncovered studs. Since the laundry room is unheated and uninsulated, we want to install insulation between it and the adjacent family room. I understand that Kraft-faced fiberglass should be installed with the facing toward the warm side (i.e., toward the family room) and is normally stapled to the studs before the sheetrock is installed. But, because we have to install the installation "from behind," as it were, how do we attach it? Can we use dollops of adhesive to glue the facing to the back of the sheetrock that's already in place? If so, what adhesive?
MB
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Minnie Bannister wrote:

No need to glue. It will friction fit.
--
Joseph E. Meehan

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they make a encapsulated insulation it has plastic on both sides you can staple it facing out
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Minnie Bannister wrote:

The real solution is to install insulation on the walls not adjacent to the family room (that is the outside walls (if you have other rooms without insulation) so that the laundry room becomes part of the heated basement. You could still install insulation between the laundry room and the family room but use unfaced bats.
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On 05/25/04 07:12 pm George E. Cawthon put fingers to keyboard and launched the following message into cyberspace:

There are so many water pipes, drainpipes and electric conduits on the walls of the laundry room that insulating those walls would be a real pain. What would be the advantage of doing so?
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