I want my own 100 gallon propane tank.

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I gave mine two weeks to dry under hot sun. Plus, the volume after filling with water, was minuscule. The first thing I did was stick a torch inside, to check.
i
i
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Ignoramus8416 wrote:

I'm glad you are careful.
--

dadiOH
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We used to weld them all the time. Hook a rubber garage exhaust hose up to an idling vehicle and stick it over the fill tube. Leave the sending unit out. Let the vehicle idle for about half an hour. Water isn't what you want, what you want is to move some air through it. Gas evaporates easy.
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On Sat, 17 Sep 2011 14:54:04 -0700 (PDT), jamesgangnc

It is not just moving AIR. HOT AIR helps - and so does CARBON DIOXIDE. So you want an engine that is running hot and efficient - Carbon MONOXIDE is NOT what you want in the tank, as it can still burn. When I need to weld a fuel tank or oil pan or similar device I fill the container with CARBON DIOXIDE from a fire extinguisher. Dry Ice can also be used. Carbon Dioxide is heavier than air so will displace any oxygen in the container - it will not support combustion, and it will not absorb great amounts of heat, making sldering/brazing/welding difficult. As long as the repair site is below the level of the CO2, the repair is safe. NEVER weld or braze on the TOP of the container because it is POSSIBLE there is trapped air/fuel in a pocket at the top. With CO2 leaking out of the repair site there is no chance of fuel-gas fronm the torch getting into the tank unburned and "going off" as some bozo in a former thread on this subject suggested as the cause of a possible explosion.
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wrote:

CO2 would be common to any welder's shop.
Steve
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On Sat, 17 Sep 2011 10:06:44 -0500, Ignoramus8416

And as was stated on this list at the time - you beat the odds. The odds were not heavily against you, but the POSSIBILITY that the tank could explode, even when :filled" with water was still there. If you were brazing a spot that was below the water line your odds were a whole lot better for having no problem explosion-wize - but the difficulty of brazing the tank went WAY up.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote the following:

You would have a problem Brazing below the water line though. The metal could not get hot enough to braze. That's like trying to solder a pipe joint while water is in the pipe.
Here's what some say about preparations for welding on a gas tank. 1. Pour water and detergent mix into the so-called empty tank. Slosh it around to cover all inside surfaces. 2. pour out the water detergent mix and whatever liquid gas was left. 3. Rinse the tank with water. 4. Turn the tank with the opening up and pour some dry ice into the tank. Dry ice skips the liquid stage and goes from a solid to carbon dioxide gas. Carbon dioxide fumes will fill the tank, pushing up and out any fumes suspended in the tank. Additionally, CO2 will not support ignition. That's why they put it in fire extinquishers. Weld to your hearts content.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote the following:

Here's what some 'experts' say about preparations for welding on a gas tank. 1. Pour water and detergent mix into the so-called empty tank. Slosh it around to wash all inside surfaces. 2. pour out the water detergent mix and whatever liquid gas was left. 3. Rinse the tank with water. 4. Turn the tank with the opening up and pour some dry ice into the tank. Dry ice skips the liquid stage and goes from a solid to carbon dioxide gas. Dry Ice will continue to produce CO2 until it evaporates, unlike using straight CO2. Carbon dioxide fumes will fill the tank, pushing up and out any fumes suspended in the tank. Additionally, CO2 will not support ignition. That's why they put it in fire extinquishers. 5. Weld to your hearts content.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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<stuff snipped>

You're right to be wary: Those were BLEVE's - Boiling Liquid Expanding Vapor Explosions. Depending on the circumstances, they can fly pretty far. Firemen really dislike fighting such fires because of the danger of tanks and parts becoming mini-rocketships, propelled by superhot gas exiting the relief valve (or sometimes the hole where the relief valve used to be after the relief valve has rocketed off).
http://www.firenuggets.com/dunnsdispatch/dunnsdispatch3.htm
says:
<<The distance that a piece of steel can be blown away from the explosion depends, in part, on the size of the container and the amount of liquid petroleum gas stored inside. BLEVEs of large tanks have blown metal pieces up half a mile away from the explosion. Firefighters who were 800 feet away from such a BLEVE have been killed by hurtling tank parts. Obviously, a small cylinder will not cause shrapnel to travel as far as will a large propane tank; however, firefighters directing a 30- or 50-foot hose stream to cool down exposures are within the range of rocketing projectiles and could be killed or seriously injured.
The distance covered by metal shrapnel from an exploding propane cylinder is also dependent on which section of the cylinder fails. If the cylinder remains in one piece and only the control mechanism and valve blow off, that cylinder will travel farther than if the tank splits into two large sections. A small piece of rocketing cylinder such as a control handle mechanism is not unlike a bullet or cannon ball. If, on the other hand, the propane cylinder splits apart or tears open at the seam, the large chunks of metal may not travel as far away from the explosion site; however, this type of cylinder rupture creates a larger fireball . . . In Brooklyn, New York, one 20-pound propane cylinder exploded in the cellar of a plumbing supply company. The explosion and ensuing shock wave collapsed three two-story buildings, killing four people. Five years ago, in Buffalo, New York, the shock waves of an explosion caused by a leaking propane cylinder collapsed a 200- by 100-foot brick building, killing five firefighters; propane gas was a suspected cause of the 2001 explosion and building collapse that killed FDNY firefighters Harry Ford, John Downing and Brian Fahey.>>
I think I might look into storing my 20 pound bottle somewhere safer than it is now. I'd keep it in the shed except I use it only to melt ice from the steps. Putting it in the shed means carrying it up an icy hill. Hmmm.
-- Bobby G.
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Robert Green wrote the following:

Mine are stored outside in the back yard all year round next to the grill. I use salt or sodium chloride for ice.
Propane tank farm fire in Dallas, TX.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n85R3OXK3bs
The 10 minute video was taken from a mile or two away, but the flying tanks can be seen. Note the fires started by the flying tanks all over the highway.
Jufor

--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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<stuff snipped>

than it

the
It's only four steps that face north and never quite thaw. My wife hates tracking the salt around the house and I love using what feels like a big honking Goa'uld staff weapon on those stubborn ice patches.

My dad became a forensic engineer after retiring from the Navy. He said the farthest he had measured them traveling was 300 feet. Propane tanks and boilers can travel remarkable distances if the conditions are right. Reminds me of the old failed rocket test videos. They were supposed to shoot off but didn't while the propane tanks aren't supposed to shoot off but do.
The most impressive explosion video I've seen was a fire in an explosives factory. From a mile away you could see the perfectly circular blast rings radiating from the explosion *very* quickly.
Second best was an old freighter torpedoed in a test. The explosion could be seen in two stages. First, all the soot in the main smokestack blasted into the air, black as coal, as the torpedo exploded. Momentarily that was followed by the enormous, billowing brownish-grey smoke of the torpedo's high explosive charge. The poor freighter literally got "the snot" knocked out of it.
-- Bobby G.
MOH recipient: *BELCHER, TED Rank and organization: Sergeant, U.S. Army, Company C, 1st Battalion, 14th Infantry, 25th Infantry Division. Place and date: Plei Djerang, Republic of Vietnam, 19 November 1966. A hand grenade landed in the midst of the sergeant's squad. Instantly realizing the immediate danger to his men, Sgt. Belcher, unhesitatingly and with complete disregard for his safety, lunged forward, covering the grenade with his body.
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I have welded since 1974. I cannot watch that video enough. Some of the things that stick in my mind are the very large very heavy metal tanks going hundreds of yards, landing right in the middle of the freeway. And what amazes me more is the people who slow down and stop to watch this, seemingly oblivious of an incoming steel tank of 150# at 500 F. Human stupidity and natural raw power never cease to amaze or amuse me. Too bad one of the lookie loos didn't sustain a direct hit. Just one, PUHLEEEEZE.
Steve
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wrote

the
going
seemingly
Rubbernecking. It's why in many areas they have erected fences in the median to keep people from slowing down (and thus getting rear-ended) to look at an accident on the other side of the road. I remember once when I was a photojournalist an arson investigator said that the arsonist always hangs around to see his handiwork. So I started taking pictures of the crowd. The number of people standing around (even dangerous scenes) with their mouths wide open, looking stupefied amazed me. People are drawn to disasters like moths to a flame and often meet the same fate.

It wouldn't have mattered. People still went to the Reno air show where 9 died after we had a number of air show accidents in a row. The "it can't happen to me" syndrome is a very powerful one, as the Youtube video demonstrates. People react very oddly to danger. Probably the most gruesome example I can think of was a film of people walking out into a bay drained of water by a tidal wave. I used to think they were idiots that were unaware that some tidal waves drain some areas BEFORE a huge rebound but I now think they knew but were irresistibly drawn to the strangeness of the situation. And they died a pretty horrible death.
-- Bobby G. *ENGLISH, GLENN H., JR. Rank and organization: Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, Company E, 3d Battalion, ~03 Infantry, 173d Airborne Brigade. Place and date: Phu My District, Republic of Vietnam, 7 September 1970. Entered service at: Philadelphia, Pa. Born: 23 April 1940, Altoona, Pa. Paying no heed to warnings that the ammunition and fuel in a burning personnel carrier might explode at any moment, S/Sgt. English raced to the vehicle and climbed inside to rescue his wounded comrades. As he was lifting 1 of the men to safety, the vehicle exploded, mortally wounding him.
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This one is short and fun.............

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I9sSoMhGbiw&feature=related

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willshak wrote:

You can buy tanks from the propane suppliers if you want. Most people just lease the tanks and the propane company takes care of any maintenance, replaces the tank if there is a problem, etc. If you own the tank you will have to pay if there is a problem. Propane suppliers will generally fill owner tanks as long as they pass inspection.
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My parents bought a 500 gallon tank YEARS ago. Sold the house and land a few years ago and the tank went with it.
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On 9/15/2011 1:53 PM, willshak wrote:

Unless you like doing business with the outfits that have good marketing and well made commercials the best bet is to see if there is a local propane supplier. For example in my area there is a locally owned business that has 2 locations. They are consistently the lowest in price and also do not get carried away with fees.
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You might try an RV dealer. There's also this post that suggests that manufacturers don't want to sell 100 gallon or larger tanks to consumers. http://www.cga.ct.gov/2009/rpt/2009-R-0296.htm
Most of the propane dealers around here will sell you a tank outright and it does indeed allow you to shop for refills. The tanks have to be recertified every 10 years, so there's no liability issue with refilling a customer owned tank.
The problem is that although you can buy a tank, there's not a lot of incentive for the dealers to sell you one unless they price it quite high. Not so coincidentally, the payback when compared against renting the tank was about 15 years on a 500 gallon tank ($72/year rent vs. $1000 to buy).
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Tractor supply sells them.
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On 9/15/2011 12:51 PM, Rico dJour wrote:

I've been through this with propane companies in the past. This may be a regional thing, but in my area, downstate NY, any propane company will sell you whatever tank you like. They will only fill your tank if they did the inspection on it. If you want to shop prices, any new company will charge for an inspection before they'll fill it. Needless to say, I got away from using propane. I use oil for heating, and have a large storage capacity that only needs one filling per year, so I shop around and get the best cash price
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