HVAC question

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wrote:

That pump is to pump out the water byproduct of the gas burning. On older lower effeciency furnaces the water would go out as vapor. On newer furnaces the exhaust temp is too low so the water condenses. It's optional because some people have a drain nearby in the floor tha the pipe can be routed to. Yours maybe has to pump up to a sink drain or something like that?
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On Mon, 19 Oct 2009 10:39:29 -0700, jamesgangnc wrote:

Yeah, that's it. We've got no drain in the basement floor, and the main pipe to the septic runs at about chest height along the basement wall. The pump raises it about 8' though, where it taps into one of the drain lines running from a sink.
Sounds like it's irrelevant to the OP's problem, then...
cheers
Jules
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It's called a "condensate pump". One of the reasons 90 percenters are so efficient, they condense the steam out of the exhaust gas, which puts more heat into the house.
In the summer, the AC drains humidity out of the air, which also needs to be pumped out.
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..air basically feels clammy...bought a

50% doesn't feel clammy to me, but maybe it would to you. Condensation on a triple pane window sounds unlikely at 50% too.
But "sitting at" makes me wonder if the humidistat is working.
Your furnace should be cycling. This early in the season it should be off longer than it is on.
Can you watch your humidistat and see what happens when the furnace comes on? Does the humidity raise or lower as the furnace runs? That should tell you something about what is going on.
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Jim wrote:

In addition to all the other good advice and questions, do you have a gas oven/range? Been cooking/baking a lot? Normally no one pays attention to the warning that the exhaust fan should be on when cooking. Besides using up oxygen, it puts LOTS of moisture in the air.
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