HVAC air intake near gas heater

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wrote:

Clinging hard to your fantasy? It's ok, just admit you've got it wrong and let it go.

You're the only one here making things up, dancing monkey boi.

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wrote:

No fantasy, just facts that you can't understand is all.

Just because you don't understand it, doesn't mean it's made up, Dipshit.

No treat for you today.
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kjpro @ usenet.com wrote:
SNIP HAPPENS

"...too...", not "...to..."
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kjpro @ usenet.com wrote:
More personal, insulting and uninformativ claptrap, which renders any small item of
information contributed not worth the effort of sorting through the antagonistic
crap to find the small nuggets of anything worthwhile.
<PLONK>
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Oh no, he plonked him. I bet that hurt his feelings. LMAO Grow some balls you fucking 'word' police.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Are you sure the duct is not make-up air for the furnace and water heater? Check out this website for an easy to understand explanation about the subject.
http://home.howstuffworks.com/home-energy-saving-systems-ga.htm
If you don't know, call someone, a knowledgeable friend or service company. You could wind up with a carbon monoxide problem if you tamper with the vent.
[8~{} Uncle Monster
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wrote:

Re-read...
Quote: If I remove the grills and cover up these so they can't get air, the duct work at that location gets sucked in slightly due to the negative air pressure (I think I'm saying this right.)
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kjpro @ usenet.com wrote:

That seems quite odd. If the room is airtight, you should still have it checked out by someone with knowledge of proper ventilation. The problem you may have is explained on the website. It might be solved by simply cutting a small supply register into the duct coming off the air handler. If I understood your original post, the furnace is next to the water heater. It's puzzling why a duct would be run to the attic for any other reason than make-up air. If the duct is open to the attic, a powered attic vent could cause the negative pressure. It's hard to figure out what's going on with limited information. For your own safety, get it checked out.
[8~{} Uncle Monster
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wrote:

It's really not that hard to figure out...
The return ducting is run to the attic space, where it probably splits off to many different locations.
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kjpro @ usenet.com wrote:

That's not what it sounds like to me. I wish Edwin would post some pictures to an image sharing site. Pictures of the air handler/furnace setup would be great. It could also be a problem of terminology. There are a number of sites that show illustrations of HVAC components and their proper names.
[8~{} Uncle Monster
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The HVAC is in the corner. At the bottom is an air filter which then has duct work that runs towards the water heater. Then there is a decent sized duct that runs up, through the first floor, and into the attic. In the attic there are two round flexible tubes connected to this. One runs to a air intake vent in the master bedroom and another to the hallway on the other side of the house.
The openings in the duct work are in this structure. The water heater sits right next to it.
A picture is here linked below. Bare in mind that this is over a year old. The basement is finished now. You can sort of see one of the openings in the duct work at the top -- it's a white grill. The other is a few feet below that, more slim but longer.
http://farm1.static.flickr.com/54/156900787_02832ab758_b.jpg
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On Aug 23, 10:16 am, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Very clear that this is in fact vents in the main return duct at the furnace. Were these there before the basement was finished? If so, it's totally bizarre. You would be sucking huge amounts of basement air, which you don't want to conditon, into the system. And with no air vents into the basement on the supply side, it's a prescription for all sort of problems. Drawing outside air into the basement, drawing conditioned air from the house into the basement, creating negative pressure affecting combustion, etc.
If it was done as part of finishing the basement, it would make a little more sense, but still be wrong. I'm thinking they might have added them as returns for the basement. But they then should be in the finished space and never that close to the water heater/furnace.
My guess is this was some homeowner added crap, based on some very incorrect ideas.
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The basement was initially unfinished. There have always been supply vents in the basement ceiling, however. There are/were 7 or 8 of them down there. The venting was there from day 1. Nothing was changed in the venting/duct work as a part of finishing the basement.
I'm getting the number of someone who does duct work and I'll have them close those up and run a new air intake out in the hall way.
I would have never though that to be a problem until I read the Popular Mechanics article stating this is a problem. I just wonder how many other homes have this setup. This builder has many homes in the county. I know where one is, I might have to stop by and ask to check it out..
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Thousands... I see it all the time.
There are hacks everywhere! :-(
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

A picture says a thousand words. Your picture helps clarify the situation. My concern about make-up air can be answered if what looks like a six inch round pipe between the return air duct and the (furnace/air handler/evaporator coil) is open at the bottom where it is behind the "L" shaped portion of the return air duct. If the pipe is open and goes through the roof and has a rain cap, you're in good shape as far as preventing combustion byproducts being drawn into the house. In your next post you mention that the basement is now finished with this equipment now closed in. Your hiring of a duct man to seal off the return air vent and run a new return into the finished area is the proper course of action and you should have no problems.
[8~{} Uncle Monster
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the situation.
I have pictures of almost the entire home on flickr, mostly private pictures, for situations like this. I went wild w/the digital camera.

if what looks like a six inch round pipe between the return air duct and the (furnace/air handler/evaporator coil) is open at the bottom where it is behind the "L" shaped portion of the return air duct.
Not sure what you mean by open. As I recall, it mates up to the duct work there. I'll have to check when I get back to the house.

the roof and has a rain cap, you're in good shape as far as preventing combustion byproducts being drawn into the house.
Yes, this goes to the roof and has a rain cap. I'm assuming this opening allows combustion gases to vent out through it? I really don't know this stuff at all.

finished with this equipment now closed in. Your hiring of a duct man to seal off the return air vent and run a new return into the finished area is the proper course of action and you should have no problems.
He's coming out Sat., and will do the work the Sat. after.
Thanks all! I have a carbon monoxide detector upstairs, which has never gone past 0. I have dogs in the house and would hate for something to happen the times I am gone.
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Another misconception of safety...
Check to see when your detector will signal a warning.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I have to complement you for being "AWARE" and curious. So many people have been harmed because of ignorance of their environment. Ignorance is not a dirty word, I'm ignorant about a lot of things (like producing a Broadway play, don't know a thing about it) but I can read and ask questions. Ignorant means you don't know but you can learn, stupid means no way. Keep on asking questions and learning then one day you'll be the one people look to for answers.
[8~{} Uncle Monster
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Thanks all. I wasn't sure if I was misunderstanding the terms or not. If I was being paranoid or if it was a valid concern. For $150US it just makes sense to play it safe and port it correctly.
To give the builder the benefit of the doubt, it's possible the HVAC guy just didn't realize the basement was to be unfinished. His teams work on many homes at the same time. Possibly he was waiting until the basement work began before running the cold air returns? By unfinished, I mean I didn't even have posts. It was steel beam supported. Might explain why the vents weren't attached when I moved in. I find it interesting that none of the inspections was there anything said.
The air vent questioned above -- that actually doesn't attach to anything. It goes to about 6" above the floor and is just open.
This is the CO detector I have; http://www.acehardwareoutlet.com /(nj150b552royn4npekwt0445)/ProductDetails.aspx?SKU!2370001&Source=froogle
It doesn't start reading anything until 30PPM. Why is this a false sense of security? I realize it's only monitoring CO at the location it's at, but at least I have something. I did this because the gas fire place gives off a bad smell. When power is out, that's what we use for heat. I was concerned about that. But this device has never gone over 0.
Again, thanks!
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Just looked at your photo's.
#1 Fix the return issue. #2 Both gas lines need a drip leg. #3 Electrical run needs to be secured. #4 I would remove the PVC from the water heater relief valve. #5 Install a media air filter.
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