how wide the snow path

Page 2 of 2  
On Tue, 10 Dec 2013 06:33:16 -0800, Paul Drahn

Right, so the homeowner does; the city did their part.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
...snip...

...snip...
No, it doesn't say "all of the sidewalk", it says "clear away...the snow from the foot pavements".
It also doesn't say "clear away the snow from 50% of the foot pavements" or "clear away enough snow from the foot pavements to make a walkway at least wide enough for one person to walk through", it says "clear away...the snow from the foot pavements."
Seems pretty straight forward to me...they want it cleared away from the entire foot pavement.
However, here's what I find interesting with the section of code you posted...
It specifically addresses what you are supposed to do "within 24 hours after the fall of any snow." Note the words "fall of any snow".
Ok, so the snow falls from 1AM to 6AM. At 7AM you clear the snow from the foot pavement. At 8AM the plow comes by and pushes a ton of snow from the road onto the foot pavement. Since it wasn't put there by "any fall of snow" it appears that you do not have to clear it. Well, at least not until the next "fall of any snow" at which time you would have to clear both the new snow and the plowed snow.
Maybe there is a different section of code that addresses the snow that plow put back on the foot pavement.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/10/2013 11:24 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Don't have the original posting and don't know if the ordinance mentions it but does the ordinance give the homeowner immunity from liability for complying with the ordinance and removing the snow, etc.?
It's pretty well settled in the law, I am told, that if you do NOT shovel your sidewalk and a passerby slips and falls it's on him, not you. However, if you go out, shovel the snow and there's a freeze thaw cycle that creates ice (black or otherwise) and you do nothing to remediate it, and the next goof walks by and breaks his leg... guess what? You could be held liable. Another variant, I guess, of don't mess with Mother Nature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/10/2013 7:42 PM, Unquestionably Confused wrote:

I've always thought that way - if there is snow on the walk, the pedestrian knows what they are getting into and it's up to them whether to walk there or not. Not talking about in commercial areas etc, but in my neighborhood where there really aren't pedestrians other than the mailman and the occasional dog walker. It snowed here the night before last, and I shoveled my driveway and not the sidewalk. The driveway still had a thin refreezing slush on it, that hindered my walking on it. I actually found it safer to walk in the snowy areas. This was for 2-3 inches of snow; obviously wouldn't work for a foot but we don't usually (knock on wood) get that much.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/9/2013 10:44 AM, micky wrote:

I start off with a wider swath than I end up with as I get tired. I'm a middle aged (and then some) 5' tall woman, and in my neighborhood, no one goes around looking for business shoveling. I spend my energy on my driveway, and frequently let the sidewalk fend for itself. Most of the neighbors seem to follow that approach. The mailman says he doesn't care as long as the driveways are clear enough to get to the mailboxes. My home & driveway are positioned directly across from a right angle road (ie, if the person coming down that road neglects to turn left or right, they'll end up in my driveway). Problem is that when the county plow comes down that road and swings to its right, it shoves all of its snow up on top of part of the public sidewalk. One time, the pile was almost my height and several feet wide, so no way could I clear the sidewalk.
When I was house hunting, I actually wanted to find a house with no public sidewalk so that I wouldn't have to worry about it. Alas, I didn't find a house I liked, but in my immediate neighborhood at least half of the blocks don't have a sidewalk. I'm seriously considering finding out if I'm required to have a sidewalk, or if I can just remove it and plant grass!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/9/2013 9:09 PM, Lee B wrote:

Consider a snow blower. I've been using one for the pat 12 years now.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Monday, December 9, 2013 9:34:20 PM UTC-5, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Although we don't get a lot of snow here just north of Baltimore, we have a 90' drive and every so often we get so much snow that I can't get the car out to the street unless I clear the drive. I bought a good two-stage blowe r but only use it every third year, on average. Still, when needed, it's a lifesaver. Starting in November, I start it up and let it run for several m inutes on the first weekend of every month to make sure it's ready for acti on.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
micky wrote:

I don't shovel the side walk at all, because we don't have sidewalks and I don't have to shovel the grass.
--
Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If I had a community sidewalk, I would probably try to clear the whole thing, and some salt. Most of travel at my house is through the driveway. Unless I expect a lot of company, I do the least possible. If my two leaf blowers don't do it, I just sparsely push the snow around, with a little salt.
Greg
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

We generally don't get mor than 4-6 inches anymore, but got 17 inches 4 years ago. that required some work. My cavalier was in my front lawn. I had to clear about 6 feet in back of it, to get on the street. Probably 25 inches at the curb.
Greg
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

We live a little outside town, and the only sidewalks are between our driveway and our door. I shovel the whole width, while my husband works the 100-foot driveway with the snow blower. (I also shovel the patio and the deck, so that we can get to the grill and hot tub, respectively.) If the snow is really deep, he does the sidewalks and patio with the snow blower.

I pretty much ignore other people's snow removal unless I visit them. Then I'd prefer somewhat more than 18".
Cindy Hamilton
--





Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.