how to run copper pipe/pressure ? for back up sump

I am installing a water powered backup sump pump which works on pressure. My water pressure isn't that high About (38psi at a faucet), but a guy I know who lives on the same street had one of these installed (by a plumber) and said it worked fine. My pipe is all 1/2" in the house. I was going to install a 3/4 fitting at the water meter and use 3/4 pipe for the backup pump. And I was going to put a reducer going to the rest of the house from the meter. I was wondering if I should run the pipe up and along the ceiling. The pump is going to be across the room in the basement. I assume it's stupid to run it low to the ground and possibly against code? I am trying to keep it as straight a run as possible. But, right now, i'm looking at a few turns and of course the rise from the meter to the ceiling. I have read and heard (even from plumbers) that increasing the diameter of my pipe will get me more pressure. I have also read and heard that doing so will only increase volume. Thanks
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

A larger pipe will not give you more pressure, but will increase the flow. Till you go back to 1/2" line. Pressure is set by your location, relative to the standpipe/pump that supply the water. Was going to say check water pressure at the meter, but others on your street have the same problem.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

It will give you more pressure for that same flow rate. If you start out with a given pressure at the beginning of a pipe, the pressure at the end will be less as the flow rate increases. The larger the pipe, the smaller that drop will be for the same flow rate.
I'd run the pipe as you would any plumbing job. The shorter the distance and the less elbows the better. And I'd run it along the joists, not across the floor.


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Apr 11, 9:18�am, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

.
any chance of relocating the sump with pump closer to the meter? have you talked to the water company they may be able to up the pressure some
another overlooked issue.
often homes sit above ground level, like where the street is lower than the basement level.
ideally the sump could drain to daylight, like running a line to street level.
gravity tends to be highly reliable, sure the ditch digging might require a backhoe but its a one time expense if done right, using quality materials like schedule 40 pipe.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

...
The pump is in the front of the house almost towards the center and the sump is in the corner of the back of the house. The h2o company wont up the pressure. It's a pain. I would like to take a shower with some pressure too. I know I could install a booster, but I shouldn't have to (nobody should). They do the stupidest things sometimes like make all the newer toilets low water consumption. I had to alter my valve to let more water in. Sometimes my # 2's wouldn't even go down! Gimme a break! How much is a water bill? Let's try and save energy , not water!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

om...
have you removed the flow restrictor in the shower head?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

.com...
What is that?I don't see anything that will increase pressure. i have taken the whole head apart. I have one of those 2 head ("high pressure")shower heads. One is a hand rinse with the hose. Thanks
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
chrisc wrote:

Since you have low pressure, maybe you need a "low pressure" head.
Do both heads run at once? If so, that will double the pressure drop in the pipe to the shower, lowering the flow to each head.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
chrisc wrote:

Larger pipe will reduce the pressure loss at any given volume. The higher the volume, the more drop a given pipe will have. If the pump uses a lot of water, the larger pipe should give better performance.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.