How to remove hardened grease from side of a pot?

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What's the best substance for enabling one to remove baked-on grease from the side of a pot? It has picked it up from sitting on the stovetop for years of cooking beside it (I have little space).
409 or its equivalent has not worked. How about WD40? Vinegar? Any ideas?
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snipped-for-privacy@spamgourmet.com wrote:

How about just using some spray on oven cleaner like EZ-Off?
IIRC it's basically lye.
Wear rubber gloves if you start scrubbing the stuff, it'll start burning your skin pretty quickly.
HTH,
Jeff
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Jeff Wisnia wrote:

Yep, if it won't damage the pot. Grease plus lye makes soap!
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Oven cleaner. Read the instructions, use it outdoors if it's the stinky kind.
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JoeSpareBedroom wrote:

But caution is required...
The OP didn't identify the material used to make the pot. Lye (the major component of oven cleaner) is quite reactive with aluminum and will destroy it.
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An interesting thing to watch, no doubt!
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Hmmm... I use baking soda on a lot of things with a lot of success. Perhaps baking soda and hot water will at least get some of it off then use the oven cleaner?
Michael
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Caution is required, but that doesn't mean one can't successfully use oven cleaner (the lye type) on aluminum. It depends how long one leaves the oven cleaner on the pot, and how much one is concerned with a pristine appearance on the pot. When I say "pristine", I mean how much the baked on grease bothers one compared to the slight degrading of the aluminum surface.
I've used the Easy Off extra strong stuff on a big aluminum pot I used for deep frying turkeys. The pot has a lot of burned on grease after doing that. One can see a definite reaction of the oven cleaner on the aluminum, but relative to the thickness of the pot, it would take a long, long time to eat through it. A half hour is not going to cause a big problem. It will however change the appearance of the aluminum, giving it a dull finish of a different shade (darker or lighter I don't remember).
I wouldn't use oven cleaner on any of the anodized aluminum finishes though, as it would eat through the relatively thin anodizing quite quickly and make the surface very splotchy in appearance.
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That's a good point.......
I once made the mistake of putting some dilute muriatic acid into an aluminum pot to get the hard water deposits off.
BIG mistake!
Good thing I was doing it outside!!!!!!
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snipped-for-privacy@spamgourmet.com wrote:

razor blade scraper, then 3M pad with full-strength Dawn.
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Put the pot in a 5 gallon plastic bucket. Pour ammonia into the inside of the pot, and/or fill the 5 gallon bucket to the high burnt on grease of the exterior. Let it sit in there for a day. If it's outside in this hot weather, it's even better. It should just rub off with a plastic scrubbie after that.
I also use that method for barbeque grills. I put them inside of two sealed up, and doubled up plastic trash bags. Pour in the ammonia, and put it out on the patio for a day. They clean up easily and without hard physical labor.
Myrl Jeffcoat http://www.myrljeffcoat.com
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myrl snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Nothing but ammonia? No water?
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Why dilute it?
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JoeSpareBedroom wrote:

My ex's grandmother used that method for the oven - (not a self-cleaning one) - put a big bowl of ammonia in the oven and let it sit overnight - wipe off the crud. I never had very good results doing it, but she did.
N.

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It's *already* diluted if you buy it at the grocery store. Undiluted ammonia is an industrial product and fairly dangerous to handle.
D.
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wrote:

Right, but you know what I meant: Why dilute it any further?
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I use no water with that!
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I quote enough text that I don't look like a mental case.
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On 23 Jun 2006 10:09:12 -0700, myrl snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

The only place we vary on technique is that I like to seal the greasey thing in a bucket or plastic bag, but up *out of the ammonia*. In my experience it seems to be the fumes that clean the best.
If the pot is aluminum and old you might need to use a little aluminum polish on it afterward.
Jim
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snipped-for-privacy@spamgourmet.com wrote:

Hoooold on. What is the pot made of? Stainless Steel? Aluminum? Cast Iron? Anodized Aluminum?
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