How to remove graffiti scratched and edged on glass?

I have a commercial building with 1/4" plate safety glassed on a store front that has been graffiti with paint, scratches and acid edged. I could scrape off most of the paint but those paint embedded in the scratches and acid edge are hard to remove. I've tried to remove it with a little high speed rotary tool fitted with a wired wheel and a small buffer - very little progress, will take hours. I will try with my 7" buffer with some aggressive car polish next time. If that doesn't work I will use lacquer thinner. Any other suggestions?
The city already send the owner three nasty notices about removing the graffiti or take them to court for non compliance, paid all fines, graffiti removal, court cost, lawyer's fees, etc. I've been cleaning graffiti (I'm the maintenance guy) once every two weeks on that building for the last 20 years. Every two weeks doesn't seem fast enough for the city and they don't return phone calls or reply to mails requesting more time or exactly what is required for compliance. Seems like the city is more interested in punishing the property owner (more revenue) than catching the taggers. Are graffiti laws in your city this harsh or they give you a little more leeway and work with you?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I used to travel a lot and my back fence was tagged. I missed the stupid flyers on the door handles and got a letter that stateing do or die. I was leaving on another business trip and politely responded in writing, I would be home for a week or so on such and such a date and the eye sore would be fixed by such and such. Never heard another peep from them. I did what I said I would do and was glad when I moved. It was never ending the painting. And this was a f-ing alley. Respond in writing, save a copy "screw-em" Call your local TV channel that does government waste stories. They will love the publicity.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Stop using a buffer. You'll break the glass. I would email you but you give no address.
Lacquer thinnner only works for lacquer afaik. I don'pt think graffite is done with lacquer, but someone here will know.
There are loads of solvents. You want the one for the paint they used.
Remove NOPSAM to email me. Please let me know if you have posted also.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Acetone is another powerful solvent that I'd try.
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Might want to experiment with some gelled paint stripper. That'll remove just about anything and _should_ be safe on glass. Test first to make sure it doesn't etch the glass even more.
Used the gell variety, so it doesn't just flow off the window.
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
It\'s not just anyone who gets a Starship Cruiser class named after them.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

To reply to my own post: Lacquer thinner thins lacquer. I don't know what it does to lacquer or other paint after the paint is dry.
I would use paint stripper, the gel type like someone said.
I might also call a janitorial supply company to see what they have, or the police (not 911) or building department to see what they recommned.
The poster idea is very good too.

Remove NOPSAM to email me. Please let me know if you have posted also.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Paint remover !!!
If you got to do the legal route, it would probably be cheaper to replace the glass and much less hassle too. Until it's removed, put something on sale in the store and hang a big advertisment over that part of the window.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Try gasket remover spray found at auto supply stores. I was working on my washing machine and used this to remove a silicone gasket so I could put on a new one. I had the washing machine transmission setting on top of my freezer when I sprayed the gasket. Some got on the freezer, stupid me should have put down some newspaper. After ten minutes of setting, the gasket came right off with just a scrapper and so did some paint on freeze right down to the metal. Don't know what it will do to windows, but you could give it a try. Even tells you on the can to avoid painted surfaces.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

E-Pox-EE spray appliance white, or maybe just glossy white (it's been 25 years) works great, and puts a hard white finish on it just like the original one.
Although you're probably in the garage and it's hard to spray indoors, both because of overspary and inhaling.
I wish I could remember how I painted my washing mahcine in my apartment.... because now my machine in the basement needs touch up.
(I shouldn't have left wet clothes drying on the top, overhaning the front. I have a liltle rust and missing paint just below the top now.)
Don't know what it will do to windows, but you

Remove NOPSAM to email me. Please let me know if you have posted also.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jack wrote:

If the graffiti is any kind of paint, semi-paste paint remover should take it off. In spots where there is "etching" or scratches, I would use an old toothbrush with paint remover to get it out of grooves. Deep scratches can make the glass crack, so I would use care. There is a product for removing graffiti, but I've never tried it.
Has owner filed insurance claim? I would have a glass contractor look at damage and see if the windows are secure.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

This is part of doing business in that area, no claims or insurance company will drop you like a hot potato - save it for a big one.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

While there may be a number of ways to get the paint off, the scratches and etching are there to stay. Given the amount of maintenance this window requires it might be worth looking into some of the latest anti graffiti products (like what they paint the subway cars with now) and closing the window off with that stuff.
If you do get it clean, try wiping it with a thin film of oil daily (spray on WD40 and squeege off), while it may collect dirt more quickly and may not look very clear, it may keep the next round of paint from sticking at all. A daily wipedown may well be less work and cost than cleaning it bi-weekly even if the owner has to assign a new worker to do it.
Also try putting a motion detector floodlight inside the window so it lights up the whole street when someone gets close to the glass (though this may make them want to break it)
Why can't they just piss on a hydrant like a dog to mark their territory?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

You could always find the #$%%&*^(* that caused the graffiti and make THEM clean it. Make them use their hair or other body parts to do the job.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@invalid.com wrote:

Yes but wouldn't that be mean and hurt their feelings...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
EtchBusters had written this in response to http://www.thestuccocompany.com/maintenance/How-to-remove-graffiti-scratched-and-edged-on-glass-45184-.htm : You can call us if you are near the Los Angeles area. Etch Busters specializes in removing graffiti damaged windows for 1/3 of the price to replace. www.etchbusters.com
RJay
Jack wrote:

-------------------------------------
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.