How to orient hall ceiling lights?

I bought a pair of antique circa 1890 ceiling lighting fixtures for a hall. I have not yet installed them.
Today I find this picture with a pair just like mine: http://www.nytimes.com/slideshow/2011/12/19/greathomesanddestinations/20111225WYGSS.html#3
But they are oriented 90 degrees differently than what I had planned. Now historically there must have been an orientation that was used. Which way was it?
Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

http://www.nytimes.com/slideshow/2011/12/19/greathomesanddestinations/20111225WYGSS.html#3
Probably, it's an aesthetic decision. One thing that I can tell you for sure -- from a lighting standpoint, orientation makes no difference.
Tomsic
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I think the answer is it depends. In the pic at the NY Times they look good going across the hallway. However if the hallway was narrow relative to the fixture, then orienting them going with the hallway would probably look better. Just hang one temporarily and see what works for you.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Don Wiss wrote:

Maybe it's supposed to make you feel like that narrow hallway is wider.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

While you may be thinking of better light distribution having them run with the hall, the fixtures are better viewed as shown. I doubt it will make much of a difference in the brightness of the hallway.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I can never remember the name. In Dutch they are called the equivalent of "little socks".

That's what I thought.
--
Best regards
Han
email address is invalid
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 23 Dec 2011 06:31:50 -0500, Don Wiss wrote:

http://www.nytimes.com/slideshow/2011/12/19/greathomesanddestinations/20111225WYGSS.html#3
"Orient" is no longer considered acceptable use. You should be using "Asian".
--
Q: "How does one measure the height of a building using a barometer?"
A: Drop the barometer off the building onto someones head, killing them
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The orientation shown is ideal for cfl lights. The electronics stays wuch cooler.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

that in any way? NINETY DEGREES would put them in-line down the hall instead of 2 abreast.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

installation, but either is "correct"
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 23 Dec 2011 23:58:28 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Actually my hall is different from what is pictured. My hall is a hallway that surrounds a side stairs (the way they did rowhouses back then). There is a door on the side of the hall at each end. By orienting mine parallel with the hall, the sides will be seen as one is turning at the end of the stairs (especially on the way down), and when exiting those two side rooms.
To me the way it was done in the picture is odd.
I had not unwrapped mine. To be transported home (via car service, hotel storage, bus seat, taxi) they had been all wrapped in bubble wrap. I decided to unwrap and post a picture. I found that the very, very flimsy shade-holders they put on got mangled. Checking my other 1890 gas fixture I found much sturdier holders had been put on (and have brass lips under the cardboard sleeves). Here one is:
http://donwiss.com/pictures/misc/HallPendantFixture1890.jpg
Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

In the photo showing the fixtures 'crossways' in the very, very narrow hallway:
It looked like the lighting was oriented [oops] to show the fixtures, visually 'widen' the hallway, AND very effectively throw light down onto the pictures hanging along the hallway's picture gallery. All in all, the best orientation for that claustrophobic hallway.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Just looked at the jpg, a bit wonky on the right? But all in all, where is the best place to get architectural accents?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Wonky or not, the quality of the shade holders is unacceptable. I'll need to get new ones and have the fixture rewired. Are there some tricks to getting the wire stuffed through the piping?

There are architectural salvage places all over. I hunted the web and made a list of them for reference. These fixtures were purchased in DC at The Brass Knob. I had previously bought some antique brass door hardware from them and while on a visit to DC I wanted to stop in and say hi. They had these fixtures and I bought them.
I'll send you my list.
Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Two ways to thread: 1. springy 'needle' about 18 inches long, push through and then pull stuff afterwards 2. rounded weight tied to a thread, bounce through structure, then pull wires though afterwards
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.