How to edge stone flooring at the wall's edge?

[note google has again goofed up my access to Usenet so I will not be able to respond timely]
We have stone flooring that butts against the drywall. Not sure, but think the stone is over thin masonite-like layer, over some s oft layer, over slab concrete. At the edge, it appears they originally put in grout, but that grout crumbles out easily, plus painting the wall down t o the flooring does NOT make a nice edge. What caluking, or something like that, can I use to make the transition pli able to not crack in the future, yet hard enough to resemble grout?
The drywall extends behind the stone tiles [stone tiles are 1/2 inch thick] and most of the original grouting is cracked and crumbling out. Worst cons truction technique I've seen in a long time, but I have to change it. Just don't know how.
At the metal sliding doors, I plan on using clear, since overlap won't show and the crack is dark enough to match the doors.
The stone is patterned, but generally, light cream colored limestone out of Turkey.
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'Robert Macy[_2_ Wrote: > ;3095324'][note google has again goofed up my access to Usenet so I will > not be able to respond timely]

> some soft layer, over slab concrete. At the edge, it appears they > originally put in grout, but that grout crumbles out easily, plus > painting the wall down to the flooring does NOT make a nice edge.

> pliable to not crack in the future, yet hard enough to resemble grout?

> thick] and most of the original grouting is cracked and crumbling out. > Worst construction technique I've seen in a long time, but I have to > change it. Just don't know how.

> show and the crack is dark enough to match the doors.

> of Turkey.
What about nailing a baseboard to the wall?
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nestork


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On Sunday, July 21, 2013 6:49:29 PM UTC-4, nestork wrote:

+1
Baseboard/molding is how it's typically done because it works and it looks good.
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Use a baseboard. If you do, leave a slight gap between it and the stone so that the stone can be masked when repainting the basebord.
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dadiOH
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On Sun, 21 Jul 2013 12:45:36 -0700 (PDT), Robert Macy

Sanded caulk. Looks like grout, flexible like caulk. Available in most grout colours
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On 07/22/2013 12:24 AM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

No baseboards? That would be the easiest way I would think to make it look intentional, neat, and finished.
nate
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Robert Macy wrote:

I think that baseboard, of course, would be a good idea.
But, if you don't want to do that, then finding silicone caulk that matches (or almost matches) the existing grout color would work. That will stay flexible and it won't crack like the rigid grout is now doing.
Someone here mentioned that they sell sanded caulk in colors. I have never seen that, but maybe you could look for that. Just make sure that it is a type of caulk that's stays a little flexible and won't crack -- hopefully that's what it is.
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google laticrete sanded caulk. It's about $6 a tube.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Okay, I did the Google search. I still can't tell for sure if they make sanded caulk that is also 100% silicone, or if the only sanded caulk they make is "acrylic caulk" that is "siliconized". Since there is a difference in flexibility and waterproof properties between 100% silicone caulk and "siliconized" acrylic caulk, I was curious.
I don't need either one right now, but I was just curious. If it ever comes up that I need either one, I'll check what I see in the stores and read the labels carefully to be sure. I asked because I never heard of sanded 100% silicone caulk.
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On Tuesday, July 23, 2013 3:54:35 PM UTC-7, TomR wrote:

e mentioned that they sell sanded caulk in colors. I >> have never seen tha t, but maybe you could look for that. Just make >> sure that it is a type o f caulk that's stays a little flexible and >> won't crack -- hopefully that 's what it is. > google laticrete sanded caulk. It's about $6 a tube. Okay, I did the Google search. I still can't tell for sure if they make sanded c aulk that is also 100% silicone, or if the only sanded caulk they make is " acrylic caulk" that is "siliconized". Since there is a difference in flexib ility and waterproof properties between 100% silicone caulk and "siliconize d" acrylic caulk, I was curious. I don't need either one right now, but I w as just curious. If it ever comes up that I need either one, I'll check wha t I see in the stores and read the labels carefully to be sure. I asked bec ause I never heard of sanded 100% silicone caulk.
nice way google adds these quotes, eh?
the sanded caulk product at Home Depot is labeled 'acrylic' and 'siliconize d', evidently it is acrylic that is siliconized.
just got some tubes delorean gray and natural gray couldn't tell which one is the best color match. will find the best color, try, and post back resul ts of what it's like to work with this stuff.
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On Sunday, July 21, 2013 2:45:36 PM UTC-5, Robert Macy wrote:

e to respond timely] We have stone flooring that butts against the drywall. Not sure, but think the stone is over thin masonite-like layer, over some soft layer, over slab concrete. At the edge, it appears they originally put in grout, but that grout crumbles out easily, plus painting the wall down to the flooring does NOT make a nice edge. What caluking, or something like that, can I use to make the transition pliable to not crack in the future, yet hard enough to resemble grout? The drywall extends behind the stone ti les [stone tiles are 1/2 inch thick] and most of the original grouting is c racked and crumbling out. Worst construction technique I've seen in a long time, but I have to change it. Just don't know how. At the metal sliding do ors, I plan on using clear, since overlap won't show and the crack is dark enough to match the doors. The stone is patterned, but generally, light cre am colored limestone out of Turkey.
If there is no baseboard, then the wall is subject to scuff marks from anyt hing that touches the wall and floor. I definitely vote for baseboard, and leave a gap between the bottom of the baseboard and the top of the stone e nough that you can slip a piece of cardboard from a cereal box between the stone and the bottom of the baseboard for when you finish the baseboard. A ssuming you have a stud finder and/or a floor-level plate behind the sheetr ock, you have a good backing for the baseboard. Otherwise, some constructi on adhesive will hold it in place.
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