How to cut premade formica counter

How to I cut excess lengtth from pre-made formica countertop.
I bought two pieces at HD, with 45 degree ends, which are fine, but I need to cut off at the other end.
I intended to follow advice I once read here about cutting a bit longer and finishing with a carbide router bit.
But I forgot that my pieces have a bull-nose front end, and a built-in splash-back. The router won't get close to an inside curve, and won't have a surface to rest on when doing the front outside curve.
I bought a 140 tooth 7 inch blade, but now I think a circular saw will have the same problem. (I wanted a fine tooth blad for my 5 1/2 inch circuar saw, but couldn't find one. Can I put a speed control on the 7 1/4 inch saw to make it cut more slowly? I have one I could use.)
Do I need to use an electric sabre saw, or a handsaw? I can clamp a piece of wood as a guide for the flat part in the middle, but I don't see how I can do a perfectly straight line for the rest.
Should I use a sabre saw with a clamped fence for the middle and a hand saw for the curved parts?
I'm so unsure. and I'd like to do this outside before it gets cold out. Only 65 degrees today.
Thanks.
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1. A 12" radial arm saw would be perfect for this.
2. Hand saw but it require pretty good skills to cut it perfectly.
3. Next would be either router and circular saw: provide some dummy wood for support on the outside corner and cut it from the top with the router (no circular saw) and then cut the inside corner from the back with either router or circular saw. The trick is to have the line meet perfectly between the back and front. I'm always off a little.
Finish off 2. or 3. above with a belt sander or hand plan to get perfect line.
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mm wrote:

Do it from the back side. With a router and a straight edge guide.
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I did this recently & had planned to use the router ... did, in fact, except in the places you described where it wasn't manageable (would have been possible with a jig, maybe, and/or a longer bit designed for such things). I ended up finishing with a sabre saw (same deal with the sink cutout). The formica chipped in one spot, I think because I was pushing the saw rather than letting it cut.
Anyhow, I got a nice clean edge that didn't need much fixing before gluing the end cap on. Most of my sabre-sawing was on the back, but when I did it on the front I protected the countertop with masking tape.
You can put tape on the saw instead, but in my experience it wears through more quickly.
I'm no expert, having replaced only one countertop in my life. It came out okay. If I had paid a professional, I would have expected (and certainly gotten) better results ... but I wouldn't have had as much fun OR been able to convince my wife I needed more tools.
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Score the Formica with a sharp utility knife to prevent chipping. The post form material is much thinner than regular Formica so you should be able to score through the entire layer. Then flip the counter over and cut it about 1/8" longer than desired with a saber or circular saw. Finish to the cut line with a router, fine hand (trim) saw, plane or belt sander. Be patient.
Boden
mm wrote:

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wrote:

Reverse tooth blade in your jig saw.
Cut a little long, sand back to the line you need.
Ken
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On Tue, 11 Oct 2005 22:14:27 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@nospam.tnx wrote:

Thanks to all of you. Definitely a lot of good ideas.
This one definitely prompsts a question. :)

Are you saying saw from the back but find a blade in which the teeth go the opposite direction , so I won't chip the formica?
So they make blades with teeth that go the opposition direction??

OK.
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