How to change cabinets but keep same granite?

Is it possible to seperate the cabinates & granite counter top once the granite is installed? I would like to change the cabinate and re- use the granite counter top. is that possible? or will i have to throw out the granite slab along with the cabinates?
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What's wrong with the current cabinets?
If you're not changing the layout, new doors should be all you need.
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On Fri, 25 May 2007 07:11:53 +0000, Noozer wrote:

Yep! Cheer up your kitchen by replacing doors and drawer-fronts once in a while. Very rarely will the carcases themselves need replacing.
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My contractor put big globs of silicone when laying down the granite. It could be a pain to separate it later to install new cabinets. I could imagine it would be ok laying the granite on top of the cabinets without silicone as its not going anywhere. Also changing out the sink could be a bitch as old cutout may no longer match with the new style sinks a few years down the road.
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I have had the reverse experience on two rental units.
The problem was water damage. You have to get a few steps above the bottom of the line before the makers use something other than composition board for the sides, back, "kickplate," and bottoms.
When this stuff stays wet (from a tiny water leak) it literally falls apart.
Even if the counter top is "glued" to the cabinets, it's usually possible with a "saws all" to separate the counter from the cabinets, left the counter off (sometimes with the sink still attached), and replace the cabinets.

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Yup! I had this happen in my apartment;there was a pinhole leak in the kitchen sink faucet,the disposal rusted through and broke off,and the cabinet bottem caved in. No water came out of the cabinet(until the disposal broke off!),the bottom absorbed it all. I ended up putting a 3/4" plywood sheet in.
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Depends. If the granite is bonded directly to the cabinet tops it is probably not possible without breaking it. If the cabinets are covered with plywood attached only from below with the granite bonded to the plywood, you MAY be able to remove the plywood with the granite still attached.

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I have never tried this but if you don't want to save the old cabinets you might be able to cut the cabinet about 2 inch below the counter- top with a saw. Then you can flip the counter tops over and try to break the bond between the cabinets and the counter-top. If silicone was used, you should be able to remove the remaining wood. If epoxy was used, it will be tough.

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On Fri, 25 May 2007 09:55:46 -0700, noname87 wrote:

Ah! A master of understatement, I see :-)
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Shawn wrote:

If you are trashing the cabinets that you remove, then it is really easy to do this. If you want to save them, it is a bit harder.
What we do is drill a small (1/2" hole at the top of the cabinet face. Insert a cable saw through the hole and saw as much of the adhesive as possible.
(For info on a cable saw, look here:)
http://www.acehardware.com/sm-ace-pvc-pipe-cable-saw-093074--pi-1272900.html
When you can't reach anymore, drill another hole and start sawing again, til you have cut all of the adhesive that you can. You will probably have most of the adhesive cut except for the side against any walls. Begin lifting the free side of the granite using many wooden shims until you can get as much free as possible.
Depending upon the adhesive, when you lift it at the front, the back may break free on its own. If not, cut what you can reach with a knife or chisel.
If you want to save the cabinets, then you have to start with some shims and a hacksaw blade or a sawzall blade. The process is the same.
Remember to lift it all along the countertop, evenly.
Done it many times.
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Robert Allison
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