How much does it cost to change 15amp circuit to 20 amp

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snipped-for-privacy@fellspt.charm.net wrote:

NEC(2002) Table 210.21(B)(3) "Receptacle Ratings for Various Size Circuits" explicitly states that a 15 amp circuit must have a receptacle rating of "Not over 15 amps." Where in the NEC does it explicitly state that 20 amp receptacles are permited to be installed on 15 amp circuits?
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snipped-for-privacy@fellspt.charm.net wrote:

What about that 210.21(B)(3) cite provided by the other poster?
The circuit will still be protected at the 15 amp level

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snipped-for-privacy@fellspt.charm.net () wrote:

False.
False again -- the fact is that it is explicitly *prohibited* by the NEC. See Table 210.21(B)(3).

IF the breaker operates properly...

Installing a 20A receptacle on any circuit with 14ga wire is unsafe and a violation of Code.
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And what's the problem if the breaker is 15 amps?
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On Thu, 07 Dec 2006 20:11:58 GMT, "Stormin Mormon"

The wire can carry 15A. How is it going to carry more, with a 15A breaker?

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I guess you've never seen a breaker fail to operate...
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snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com says...

The same could be said of the 12 gauge wire in a properly wired 20A circuit. The code is designed to protect against damage caused by improper usage, not defective breakers. One must assume that the wiring and breakers are correctly sized and installed and working correctly, otherwise, one would never use any electrical devices in the home.
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Finding the keyboard operational Terry entered:

May be a dumb question but what would happen if he left the wire in the wall alone and changed the "plug" on the device to a 15 amp? If the breaker popped, the OP could change the plug back and worry about the 20 amp circuit. It would also be interesting to know if the treadmill has a mfrs plat the states it draws 20 amps. And wouldn't a device like this also have it's own fuse/cb? Bob
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I thought a treadmill worked off people power. I can't imagine why you would have one that needs a 20A circuit
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Terry wrote:

Only the really cheap ones don't have motors. Mine has a 2 HP DC motor. It is not a pro model. I have seen them with at least 3.5HP motors (note these are not the inflated numbers). Using what ever system they use to come up for advertising use I have seen 6 HP listed.
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Joseph Meehan wrote:

That just proves that some people will buy almost anything. Jogging requires no electricity.
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CJT wrote:

You don't live in snow country do you? Or maybe you just don't run. :-)
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Joseph Meehan wrote:

Good point, but I found that even in snow country, I could jog most of the time. It's actually harder to jog in the south because of the heat.
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says...

Only in America -- will people spend $100/month for the priveledge of using a $5,000 machine that simulates walking up the stairs!
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On Mon, 11 Dec 2006 21:11:20 -0600, Mike Hartigan

And they may do it in a multi-level house that has stairs, which they avoid climbing whenever possible.
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You may want to try snaking the new 12ga wire from the treadmill room to the main panel your self and then just have some one put the breaker in for you I'm sure there's someone in your family or at work that could put in a breaker for you if not hire a electrician for the outlet and breaker install all the real work is getting that wire through the walls. even do the outlet yourself just use a old works box they are very simple to install.

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RS wrote:

I agree with the op about checking the gauge of the wire first. Is it 12 or 14? You could possibly have #12 wire (20 amp) on a 15 amp breaker. In that case all you need to do is switch out the breaker to a 20 amp.
-Felder
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WARNING although the wire gauge at that outlet MIGHT BE 12 thats no guarantee its 12 gauge thruout the entire breakers circuit!
for any number of reasons like voltage drop somone MAY have run a 12 gauge wire part way thru the circuit ..............
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wrote:

This is true, but it can be a reasonable assumption if you have #12 at the outlet (in and out). You can then check the panel and if it has #12 you can be reasonably sure.
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I SUGGEST someone check EVERY outlet and fixture on that circuit!
People do all sorts of wird things. I know someone wh combined many circuits in work boxes to save some ground wires:(
better safe than sorry.
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