How do you get those labels off the vitamin and nuts plastic jars

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Many (most) of the types of plastic these bottles are made from do not act favorably to solvents of any kind, and tend to take on a foggy patina when solvents are used - not desirable, in my opinion, especially with the clear bottles.
I have the most success in removing the labels by filling the bottle/container with water, to act as a heat sink, then gently applying heat from an electric heat gun.
Don't concentrate the heat blast in one spot for too long, lest you warp the plastic bottle, but rather, keep the gun moving over all surfaces of the label, stopping often to see if the adhesive is ready to give up the label.
Joe
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I'd suggest a combination approach.
1) peel, as you mentioned 2) soak overnight in hot water 3) Scrape labels with fingernails to remove what you can 4) if you can get under the foil or paper, let the bottles dry out. Then spray with WD-40 and scrape with fingernails. Wipe off the resulting sludge with paper towels
The idea is to mix techniques. Mechanical, water, mechanical, solvent, mechanical.
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*** Try here: http://lmgtfy.com/?q=sticky+label+removal
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I've amassed a large number of prescription bottles with the labels on them. I asked the pharmacy if they'd take them to crush. No, they won't. I'm considering a small trash can fire.
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Umm, how about just putting a new label over the top, like most of us do?
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wrote:

You could try the home winemaker trick for removing the newer labels:
Fill the containter with hot tap water. Wait a few minutes for the glue to soften, then peel the label off intact.
Gary
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peel
Yes, there IS a secret solvent. Its name varies with the manufacturer, but it is usually something like "electronic circuit board cleaner".
It's not cheap - a spray can should cost about $10 at least, perhaps up to $25. Anything cheaper is garbage. The good stuff is available from stores which sell electronic stuff which will baffle you. IOW, for "pros", in the /original/ pre "China-makes- everything-and-makes-everyone-using-it-a-pro" meaning.
Also, whole they ALL claim "will not harm plastic and evaporates leaving no residue", that also varies with the manufacturer and the overall quality. All these sprays are derived from Freon, which used to be available in spray cans in the good old days, AND cleaned /everything/ AND left ZERO residue. These are "environmentally friendly" but slightly less-effective cousins.
But they WILL remove the things you mention. If the label is VERY old (like something in your basement, and the glue has turned into a hard substance which will NOT flake/scrub off) then a citrus-based "goo-remover" product will dissolve THAT stuff and then you can clean it off.
(You still have to get the *label* off in the PITA manner you describe, but the spray WILL remove the left-over glue very easily.)
The goo-remover MAY work on SOME of the "regular" labels but it will take a lot longer and it's a lot messier. And you will need a lot.
Thinner and muriatic acid might also do the job but little will be left of the container and perhaps of your hands and eyes.
In general, I usually try rubbing alcohol first, but it is useless with labels.
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wrote:

Most people wanting to clean goo do not have access to ultrasonic tanks of suitable size.

I can NOT believe I am doing this, but I am actually checking the cans.
Can 1:
M.G. Chemicals, Canada. "Electrosolve" Contact Cleaner, Zero Residue Chemical Contents: Hexane Isomers, 1,1,1,2-Tetrafluoroethane.
Cans 2 and 3:
Names etc. irrelevant, but labels mention "circuit board cleaner, no residue"
No contents listed, as they were made in the fubar-forsaken 3rd world country I currently live in. Who knows exactly what's in them, but one works very well, the other even better, but at the price of leaving somewhat visible marks on some plastics.
I believe the active ingredient (for the purposes of this thread) is 1,1,1,2-Tetrafluoroethane and/or close cousins. The smell (once you know how to recognize it) or bringing a sample to work with to the shop is the way to make sure it will do the job.
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