How do the Pro's do it?

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I always mess up the rim of my paint cans when I pour paint, especially the thick latex paint, from the 1 gal can into my roller tray.
The paint slops over the side and the rim (that seats the cover) always gets plugged up, making it difficult to close the can again.
There must be a better way of doing this!
Thanks
--
Walter
www.rationality.net
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take a brad nail and poke a bunch of holes in the recessed part of the rim. The paint then just drips back into the can.
Not a pro, but it's never failed me.
jc
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Same here, a small screwdriver works too Another tip I got from my FIL was to store the cans upside down, then the skin is on the bottom. This works best if the can is pretty full. Turn it over and drop it on the bottom before you open it to break the skin loose, Usually it will all be stuck to the bottom of the can. Just be sure the top is on good.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

If you seal the lid with a mallet when you finish, there won't be any skin. Or maybe my cans aren't empty enough? I have read about laying a sheet of plastic wrap across the surface of the paint before you seal up the can ... never tried that.
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"Norminn" :

I have done this and I believe that it helps (but never ran a control test where I left a similar can alone at the same time). I do diligently do this for spackle and the spackle stays relatively well with out the air hardening it. The idea is to keep the air away from the substance. A full can does this well; a half can needs help. Tomes
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Tomes wrote:

My logic tells me that in order to form a skin across the top of the paint, substantial evaporation must occur. What can evaporate into half of a well-sealed can would not seem to be enough to form a skin. I have some cans of paint that must be close to 8 years old, have been used a number of times, and no sign of a skin. Gotta be careful to get paint out of rim before you smack the lid with a mallet - I tried it once the other way :o)
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wrote:

Water based pains don't have as much of a "skin" problem. Sorry for the confusion
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I use a drywall screw, as it gives a slightly bigger hole, they are everywhere, and the metal is tough, and doesn't bend easily. Those little plastic clip on lips work pretty good, too. Just clean them up RIGHT after use so the paint doesn't harden on them. They're pretty cheap. The ones they make for the five gallon buckets (just a screw on thing about as big as a tin can) are DEFINITELY worth the money.
Steve
Steve
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use your brush to clean the can
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"ransley... "Walter R." wrote:

use your brush to clean the can _________________________________________
I do the brush wipe thing too. Works fine. Tomes
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on 3/1/2008 1:02 PM Walter R. said the following:

I usually take the dry brush and run it around the groove, then scrape the paint off the brush on the lip inside the can. You can also get a plastic sleeve that slips inside the top of the can so you can scrape the excess paint off the brush without touching the can.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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Walter R. wrote:

I'm no pro so I use something like this
http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?action=productDetail&productId 2737-33288-11374&lpage=none
or another simple pouring lip which inserts into the rim of the can.
--
John McGaw
[Knoxville, TN, USA]
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Walter R. wrote:

Use KILZ (or Dutch Boy) paints. They have a unique, user-friendly, container. It's plastic, wide, screw-on lid, interior spout, lid doubles as a paint container and, when you replace the lid, the excess paint drains back into the container.
Here's a picture, but it doesn't show the innovative stuff under the lid.
http://www.in-form.com/portfolio/masterchem.html
Available at fine WalMart stores nationwide (15 Walmarts in Houston. Sorry, none in New York, San Francisco, Detroit, Boston, Chicago, D.C., Trenton, and other union-dominated cities).
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HeyBub wrote:

Now those I like!!!
--

dadiOH
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alt.home.repair:

I'm glad *somebody* like them. I've used the Sherwin-Williams plastic cans, and I hate them. I can't get a brush in without getting paint all over the handle, you can't get the last little bit out of the corners, and the tint tends to collect in the outer surround of the spout where it doesn't mix in.
--
Steve B.
New Life Home Improvement
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Only recently did I see these containers used by KILZ. I knew about DB, but never used the paint. Seems the other paint makers would do the same type containers. (No more rusty paint cans:) Oren
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Oren wrote:

I wondered about that too and finally figured KILZ (or DB) has the patent on the container and:
a) Are unwilling to license the container and destroy their competitve advantage, or b) Bear or S-W etc aren't willing to pay the license fee.
Of course some other paint manufacturer could come up with a design built around plastic, but I'm sure there'd be a patent infringement suit. For all I know, KILZ patented the square container!
I originally bought a gallon of KILZ paint based on their reputation. I figured they know how to seal and cover stuff, so their paint ought to incorporate that knowledge. Pretty good paint. Pretty good coverage.
Can't speak to durability as it was a recent application.
Anway, I was thrilled with the container.
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Walter R. wrote:

Cut a strip of foil, mold it to the rim of the can for pouring, and pour with the front of the label down (so drips don't cover the instructions or the paint formula). Masking tape would probably do the trick, as well.
My hubby says he used to drive a few nails through the ditch in the rim so's paint would drain back into the can, but I have never tried that.
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wrote:

Dollar Store soup ladle. The ladle can be used as a paint stirrer too. Rest the paint tray over the can to catch dripping paint from the ladle. Scoop transfer the paint. After a few tray refills you get a pretty good idea of how many scoops of paint you will need to cover a particular area. I even get to use the brush to mop up the residual paint on the ladle. Little waste and easy clean-up.
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Try this: http://paint-and-supplies.hardwarestore.com/47-248-misc-paint-tools/pourit-one-gallon-lid-452490.aspx
Let PaPaPingPong screw with the dollar store soup ladels Bubba

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