How Do I Cut 4 inch pipe

I'm going to open the floor of my basement to put in a sump pit. The weeping tile system is connected directly to my sewer main. I know where it connects (a y-connector was discovered near the main clean out by video inspection) and that where I'm going to put the pit. Once I get the floor open and the pipe excavated what's the best way to cut through the 4" weeping tile pipe? I'm guessing it's probably cast iron. House was built in '66. Thx.
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Alan Smithee wrote:

Why are you putting in a sump where you already have natural gravitational drainage?
Does this Y have a backflow preventer so sewer clogs don't infest the drain tiles?
at this point in your basement I would be surprised if the pipe is weeping tile pipe. I would expect it to be regular pipe, but im no expert.
--
Respectfully,


CL Gilbert
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CL (dnoyeB) Gilbert wrote:

If the main line plugs or backflows I'm in big trouble. I'm also putting in a backflow valve inside the house and probably going to put in a shut off valve outside the house. I'm going to cap the y-connector on the weeping tile side and divert the weeping tile water into the pit and pump it onto the yard.
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Alan Smithee wrote:

To answer your question about how to cut it. Chain cutter - it wraps around the pipe, keep tightening and the pipe snaps cleanly. You might be able to borrow one from a plumber.
I agree with others. It is a bad idea.
Harry K
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And in most areas, it's illegal to discharge sump pump water into the sewer system. Sewer water must be treated and this increases the amount of waste water that needs to be processed. The best way usually is to discharge it outside, away from the house.
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Except in cities with storm drains. There the ground water is drained into the storm sewer. Any way you cut it, probably it should not drain into the sanitary (or whatever its called) sewer. But I read that some older homes did. And they used a backflow preventer. In his case might as well put in 2. One from the main sewer, and a 2nd exclusively between the sewer and the draintiles.
Really no need to pump it out into the yard.
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Respectfully,


CL Gilbert
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Harry K wrote:

Chain cutter or I've just found out they make a hinged cutter for large pipes. Thx. What was it that you thought was a bad idea though? My idea for a sump, back flow valve and shut off or leaving it like it is?
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In my old house the foundation drain was connected to the sewer and it did back up when there was a lot of rain. It took 2 sump pumps to keep up with it. A guy at the plumbing supply store suggested that may be my problem and said there couldn't be that much ground water. I proved the connection by pouring food coloring down the drain and seeing it come out in the sump. After we dug it up and removed the sewer connection from the perimeter drain, the flow into the sump pit was reduced to a small fraction of what it was and was easily handled by 1 pump.
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Alan Smithee wrote:

Sorry. I meant connectign to the sewer but now I see it already is that way.
Harry K
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