How Clean Is Condensate Water?

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Just curious...
How clean is the condensate water that my 90% furnace produces?
Is there anything in it that would make it unsafe for plants? vegetables? pets? kids?
I've got no plans for it...just curious about what's in it.
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This is more of a guess than a scientifically accurate answer:
Condensate is a result of the combustion of natural gas which should be a pretty clean process, but NG isn't perfect, so there are bound to be some impurities in it, but it should be generally clean. As a furnace gets older and the heat exchanger corrodes, there should be more metallic impurities.
JK
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as Big Jake points out the water you're talking about is condensed combustion products...if the NG was 100% pure then so would the water but NG has other stuff in it plus metals picked up from the furnace.
from http://www.engext.ksu.edu/ees/henergy/space/furnaces.html#septic
Is the condensate from a high-efficiency furnace harmful to a septic system? It's unlikely that a healthy septic system will be affected by the water condensed from the flue gases of a high-efficiency furnace.
A 60,000-Btu furnace operating 50 percent of the time will produce about seven gallons of condensate a day. The condensate has a pH level of about four, which is about the same as a carbonated soft drink. However, furnace condensate is not safe to drink because of trace toxic chemicals it contains.
If it's not safe to drink...it's probably not safe for watering food plants
I wouldn't use it to water veggies or fruit but acid loving ornamentals "might" be ok. Depending on your soil it "might" help reduce alkalinity
depending on your situation....can the area you're talking about handle the water load?
Why not just dump it down the the drain?
cheers Bob
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I would bet there is lead in it and other metal impurities.

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Why lead? Just curious where the lead would come from?
JK

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Big_Jake wrote:

Distilled water (which is basically what condensate is) has an amazing ability to leach lead from solder joints. I haven't done an analysis of furnace condensate, but I did one for a coolant system, and the amount of lead was truly amazing...
If you have a system with lead solder, your condensate could contain high levels of lead.
Definitely a no no for drinking; for industrial users (i.e. those with their own discharge permits) may even be a no no for direct discharge.
--Yan
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DerbyDad03 wrote:

I seem to remember that the PH of that is rather acid. I don't think you want to use it for anything.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia \'s Muire duit
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Joseph Meehan wrote:

the condensate being acidic. They also warned about dumping into a sump where the contents are pumped out onto the ground.
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Yeah just dump it down the drain. It'll only end up in the ocean and/ or the Great Lakes, or local waterways etc. Just like much of the stuff/pollution we humans excrete! Since acid rain, caused by the smoke etc. from internal combustion engines, coal, oil and gas fired electric power plants and so forth, pollutes the atmosphere, a few gallons of acidic water, including any trace metals it contains, is probably not very significant? BTW meet anybody these days who doesn't believe in the effects of 'Global Warming'? Just thought I'd ask!
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< BTW meet anybody these days who doesn't believe in the effects of

Looking out my window at the snow howling by at 30 MPH and a predicted low tonight of less than zero, I'm wavering... <G>
Joe
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terry wrote:

however, if every house had one of these, it might add up. BTW, I just remembered another thing in the manual ..... it said something about a "special filter", whatever that is, is required in some areas.
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It is.

Art, c'mon... Have you ever been to a wastewater treatment plant?
If EVERY, STEENKIN' house in the ENTIRE city had such a furnace, the combined acidic condensate from them, compared to the total volume of wastewater, would be equal to a flea's fart in a tornado.
I guess it's true: We have become so fat, dumb, lazy and affluent that we actually consider such things. <sigh>

...and I'll bet every one of those areas is in California.
--
:)
JR

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re; "a flea's fart in a tornado"
If a flea farts in a tornado, and there's nobody there to smell it, does it still have an odor?
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Only if it's an "F3" or better.
Then there's the rating of the tornado to consider...
--
:)
JR

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Jim Redelfs wrote:

primarily remove solids. I wonder what they do about acids? I have seen the local treatment plant put out a clear liquid into the muddy river. It looks good, but I really can't tell what's in that real clear output.
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Art Todesco wrote:

?????
Actually, they remove biological waste as well as solids. All those dissolved nutrients that end up killing things. Solids removal is only a tiny fraction of the pollutants they remove, usually done in a small-ish tank or filter at the head of the plant, right where the main line comes in.

pH neutralization is part of the process.

Ask for the DMRs; they're available under the FOIA. (And if you don't know what a DMR is, educate yourself on the regulatory process for WWTPs.)
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I respectfully disagree. A modern plant, operating properly at current EPA minimums does a *LOT* more than simply remove solids.

As the OP said, they are (more or less) neutralized.

This is called "effluent".

I had the job of installing a phone line at our local wastewater treatment plant. The engineer was a friend and gave me the GRAND tour. He was quite proud of the operation and deservedly so.
Properly treated effluent, he claimed, was "almost drinkable". He explained further that he had never tried it. Still, it is almost clear and *NOTHING* like what "comes in the front door". Very impressive.
While at the plant, but outside, I had to "relieve myself" and asked if there was a toilet. He asked if my need was a "stand up proposition" (#1). It was. He pointed to a door at the top of a long, metal stair case. He told me to descend the stairs and "let 'er go". I did - directly into the incoming (raw) flow. VERY awesome.
--
:)
JR

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?

may be warming but caused by the sun not my lawnmower
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terry wrote:

Around here waste water is treated. Presumably that would include pH balancing.
Chris
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terry wrote:

If you burn Hydrogen in an Oxygen environment, you can manufacture water.
All other water is USED water, having passed through uncountably many digestive canals. Yum.
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