Hot Water Furnace Additive?


After draining my gas hot water boiler system, is there any sort of water additive I should add (e.g. anti-corrosive) when I refill it? And if so, how?
Thanks!
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Why did you drain it, you just filled it with the most corrosive element, water with Oxygen in it. So now run it hot.
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On Sat, 24 Oct 2009 09:17:52 -0700 (PDT), bobted

    Yes.
    Add HOT water. Otherwise, it will be full of COLD water.
    You're welcome.
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wrote:

Pull your dick out of your mouth, or at least stop pounding your epiglottis with it. Two things might happen: 1. You might stop damaging your already damaged brain. 2. You might actually be funny one of these days.
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There is antifreeze made for boilers, which is typically pumped into the system
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Yeah its called glycol and it comes in two flavors and colored to suit. Glycol is not a water treatment and is typically not used in a residential setting. Try again.
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RBM wrote:

Fer Petes sake. Once the water is added back in to the system it is purged of corrosive content by the heat. You don't need any additive whatsoever, unless you are going to leave it inoperative for a long spell or it is going to be in freezing conditions. It is wise to bleed the system after a few days, unless you have automatic bleeders. Most do. Don't let one of them that Union guys near it. They have been known to urinate into the feedwater. They think it cleans up their drug test. ;-p

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http://groups.google.com/groups/search?hl=en&ie=UTF-8&oe=utf-8&q=drain+and+fill+boiler&btnG=Search&sitesearch=groups.google.com
-zero
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"Not necessary" but you can if you wish add antifreeze

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Would some Prestone help reduce corrosion? Might....
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Prestone? In a boiler? I don't think so! Ethylene/Polyethylene glycol is toxic. Why would you ever put that any where near your domestic? Use a product like Harvey Heat or similar which carries all the anti-corrosive additives as well as uses Propylene which is non-toxic.
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Brian V wrote:

This is absolutely correct. Most system have an automatic water replenishment valve to compensate for any water losses. This replenishment system is hooked directly to the potable supply water for human consumption. Toxic chemicals in the heating loop could seep back into that potable system and kill or cause permanent brain damage to mammals and humans.
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now you let out stormy's secret
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How much, and over how long a time? I doubt it's that much of an issue.
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Supposedly, the water feed goes through a check valve, and a pressure reducer. No chance of backfeeding into the domestic. And if it does? Such a small ammount.
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

*Not Acceptable*
All water meters have a back flow check vale to keep each users back flow from entering the public system. But it is not full proof. The Health Department takes daily random samples for th good of the community. The back flow check systems on Hydronic Heating systems are not of the quality and are seldom maintained until full failure. Inside of that closed loop from the water meter is the drinking water of your family. I like my family, but you do as you will. I will never knowingly damage another human being with my work.

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wrote:

The cock sucking mormon is so polite when giving potentially lethal advice isn't he.
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

Just plain tap water after a couple of days of heating loses it mineral and corrosive content. It actually turns kind of dark or black in iron or copper pipping. Those pipes will remain corrosion free. If you ever expect it to freeze, then you need to add a special long term antifreeze. Hot water heat systems seldom need freeze protection. But a bit of antifreeze will insure that remote possibility.

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smells nice too. SWEET!
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bobted wrote:

Google up boiler additives. There is a lot of stuff out there.
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