Hollow Core Door Damage

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I was horsing around and put a hole in the hollow core door to one of the rooms in our castle. Is there a way of repairing said damage (crushed in 1/8" X 4")?
The Ranger
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If they are a typical pre-hung door, you may be able to swap it with a door from a little used room where the damage is less noticeable. Another option is to put a full length mirror on the door if it is in a bedroom.
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Depends on the damage. I've filled with wallboard spackle. You can put a small screw into it to pull it out if gluing is poissible.
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I also patched one as if it was a wall board. It's not really a structural problem so any fix will do.
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Frank wrote:

I have an injured HC door like that on the kitchen pantry, but it isn't painted. Anybody got any pointers on how to faux-woodgrain a small spot and blend it in? I have no interest in faux-painting entire door- I'd switch it out before I did that. Just go buy 3-4 bottles of colors in that range and an 00 brush at hobby lobby, and have at it? Then hit it with krylon sealer to match the shine of the rest of the door?
(No hurry since there is no SWMBO here, but I need to fix it before I put the place up for sale...)
--
aem sends...

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aemeijers wrote:

That's about it. You may find that stippling with the little brush works better than trying to lay down color in a continuous line. Also, dyes may work better than paint.
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dadiOH
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The Ranger wrote:

Sure...
1. Work in one or more pieces of something to back up the hole. "Something" could be thin ply or chipboard (the thin, grey cardboard like that on the back of tablets). You can afix it to the inside of the door skin by putting glue on the edges; hold it in place until the glue dries by putting a piece of string throug it, cut off and remove string after the glue dries.
2. Fill the void with something. In this case, "something" could be auto body filler (Bondo), drywall joint compound, spackle, etc.
3. Once the filler has set or dried, sand smooth and paint.
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dadiOH
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Cover with Raquel Welch One Million B.C. poster. It'll give the units something to aspire to. ;)
nb
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That's why horses aren't allowed in castles anymore.
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Already on my long list of reasons not to have hollow doors.
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zzyzzx wrote:

Oh, I agree- and if I ever get rich enough to build, the doors will be solid or paneled throughout. But that is what this place came with, etc.
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re: "and if I ever get rich enough to build"
Don't you mean "and if I ever get rich enough to build and upgrade beyond the basic doors without sacrificing any other upgrades"?
I've got lots of friends that built. Once they saw what they got for the base price, from carpeting to lighting to other "necessities", that's where they put their upgrade money.
They would have loved to have upgraded the doors throughout, but a door is a door, while there were so many other things that *really* needed upgrading both for function and for show.
At some point, most people have to make choices or they'll price themselves right out of the build.
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I know a fellow that wanted to downsize from his 5 bedroom house. Kids are gone, no need for all the space. He figured he'd sell for about $700,000 and put a few bucks in his pocket too. By the time he was done, the estimated cost of the smaller house was $1.1 million. He put the plan on hold because he just did not want to cut any of the goodies.
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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Left coast or New England? Around here, $700k would get you the largest waterfront house on a local lake (across from the golf course), AND a Mercedes to park in front. 5 BR high-end McMansions in subdivisions are going for 250-350k.
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New England. He has the biggest house on the road. This is not the priciest town either. The three car garage has: Accura SUV, Audi convertible, Corvette, BMW motorcycle. Tough choices as to what to drive to work.
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DerbyDad03 wrote: (snip)

Hey, it's MY daydream, and I'll spec it out how I want it! :^) And for damn sure, it won't be a McHouse from a McBuilder. I have access to 50 years of my father's house plans (if he isn't around any more to design me a custom), and I inherited enough of his skills to modify them as needed. None of this 'base price and upgrades' stuff- I'd rather buy a pre-owned of higher quality, if I can't afford a custom build.
But more realistically, short of my twice-a-month lotto ticket coming up a winner, the only 'build' I'll ever be able to afford is a pole barn with a hidden apartment in one end of it. And being by myself, that would probably be enough. The 1.375 houses I own aren't gonna go up in value any more- I'll be lucky if I get my money back out of them. And since us 'lifer' Feds aren't eligible for SS unless we work out in the world for ten years after we retire, my pennies will all be quite thin. So, the odds are high my next house has already been built, somewhere. Not sure where, yet, but somewhere.
I do need to get off my ass and start getting this place presentable enough to sell, though, so it isn't an anchor once I get eligible to leave. Damn glad they built that casino up the road from here, even though I'll never see the inside of it. My place is the perfect price point and commuting distance for a starter house for some youngster working there that gets hitched. Unlike the beige McMansions of many gables, starter houses are still selling around here. I made sure to buy in a low-crime area with decent schools, on a street with no heavy traffic. A very kid-friendly neighborhood.
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A little story about "basic" doors in a new build...
I was helping a friend move into her new build and was pretty impressed with the look of the house. One of the things she asked me to do was to put a cat door in the door that led to the basement. It looked like a decent wood grained 6 panel door, painted white.
I asked her if she was sure she wanted me to cut a hole in the brand new door. What if I screwed up...would it void the warranty? She told me she asked the builder about doing it and he told her that it would be cheaper for her to pay for a new door if it got screwed up than what he would have to charge her to put the pet door in as part of the build.
I was a bit confused by that until I actually started cutting into the door. The door was basically made of cardboard! It was some kind of pressed cardboard with corrugated cardboard supports in various spots. I had to be careful that I didn't tightened the screws on the pet door too much because it would deform the face of the door.
After that I looked a little more carefully at the house and noticed lots of "cheapness". For example, I was hanging shades inside the "window well" and quickly realized that they had used vinyl as the finish material. You could push on the surface and feel it flex. I had to get longer screws to mount the shades to make sure I reached the studs and tighten them just enough not to move the vinyl.
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Hollow core doors have masonite skins which does look a bit like compressed cardboard. Both use coarse fibers. The inside has cardboard spacers. Nothing really wrong with this, masonite is a perfectly acceptable material as long as you don't repeatedly expose it to water. The cardboard spacers will still be there 50 years later, the door is sealed. I'm not trying to claim they are anything other than what they are, basic interior doors that serve their purpose. Theer are millions of them out there.
Vinyl and other synthetic composites are becoming more common in construction, particularly in areas that may get wet. It doesn't rot, warp, or shrink. Again there is nothing intrensically wrong with it. Would a good hardwood or cedar be better? Sure? But are composites better that new growth pine or fir? Probably. If you've had to work on a house that had new growth pine for exterior trim combined with not getting painted as soon as it needed it (and how often does that happen) then you'd know what I mean.
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re: "Hollow core doors have masonite skins which does look a bit like compressed cardboard."
I've worked with masonite and this wasn't that. These doors really were compressed cardboard. I started cutting it with a sabre saw but it got so ragged that I ended up just using a utility knife. The sawdust was a fluffy powder, not the fine dust you get when you cut masonite.
re: "Vinyl and other synthetic composites are becoming more common in construction"
Yes, I agree. I've used Azek and other vinyl trim in both door and window installations. It wasn't so much the use of vinyl on the interior of the windows, it was the way it was installed.
The windows were set back in a fairly deep pocket and the side "walls" of the pocket *moved* when you pushed on them. There was obviously a gap between the vinyl surface material and the studs behind the vinyl, almost as if they have made the pocket too big and didn't bother to sister on any hard material before installing the vinyl.
I guess it's just that I don't expect walls to be flexible, even if they are inside a window pocket.
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DerbyDad03 wrote: (snip)

Ah, yes- the house of soft walls. I expect to wake up there one day.
--
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