Hinge Pin Locks


Does anyone know where to get hinge pin locks? Or hinges with locking pins? This would be for an exterior door that opens out leaving the hinge pins accessible when the door is locked. I have searched Google, but have, so far, been unsuccessful in finding such a product. I did happen on the patent for such a device.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Google tight butt hinge.
In the alternative you can make your own by adding a set screw accessible only when the door is open.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 22 Nov 2009 12:59:33 -0800, Roger Shoaf wrote:

Drill and tap into a hidden part of the hinge and then mark were that is on the pin. File a flat into the hinge pin and apply some loctite to the setscrew.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Another easy way to deal with this is to drill holes in opposite sides of the hinge plate, Drive in hardened screws like TapCons in the holes on one side and grind the head off so there is about 3/8-1/2 inch sticking out and when you close the door the hinges are still locked together with the pins out. You probably have to elongate the receiving side hole a bit but that is on the stop side so it doesn't really make much difference.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Here is an alternate solution. Drive some double headed nails(aka scaffolding nails) into the door jamb on the hinge side the cut off the top head. When you close the door the spike s left behind will dig into the door and prevent it from being removed. You could probably come up with any number of means to do the same task. There are also door hinges that work in a similar way. They have a tab that locks into a hole when the door is closed to prevent it from being removed by pulling the pins
Jimmie
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
There is a type of hinge known as NRP (non removable pin) that uses a set screw on the pin itself. There are also hinges that have a security stud on one leaf that engages a hole on the other leaf like this: http://www.google.com/products?hl=en&source=hp&q=security+hinges+for+doors&um=1&ie=UTF-8&ei=GNIJS7DjKoGmnQeUxLnCCw&sa=X&oi=product_result_group&ct=title&resnum=4&ved C4QrQQwAw
--
______________________________
Keep the whole world singing . . . .
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Years ago, I was friends with a counter man at a wholesale hardware supply. He told me about "NRP" which is non-removable pin hinges. I didn't google, but that kind of thing may be out in the ether.
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Stormin Mormon wrote:

I've used many of them on metal doors. The hinges have an Allen socket set screw that locks the pin into the hinge and can't be accessed with the door closed.
TDD
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

A special hinge screw is sold that you remove one hinge screw on the door and one across from it on the frame, the new one protrudes into the door when it closes about 1", so taking off all hinge pins doesnt matter. The door is pinned to the frame and cant be pried out. They are cheap and its a 5 minute job to put in one each hinge of a door. The Pin tightens with a wrench, half of it is threaded. half smooth to a point with a nut in the middle. This is the easiest and only way I know to fix your issue without putting in new hinges, which won`t match the old holes, will cost alot, your job will be hours doing new hinges, minutes putting in security screws. I have them, got them at my locksmith shop.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
ransley wrote:

I think alarm system suppliers still sell a pin that you install by drilling a 1/4" hole in a clear area of each leaf of a hinge or take the hinge off, close it and drill a hole through the the leaves and after reinstalling the hinge, hammer a special pin into the frame side of the hinge. When you close the door, the pin mates with the hole in the door half of the hinge which will keep it in place.
TDD
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
ransley wrote:

Doesn't have to be a "special hinge screw." A large nail with the head removed will work.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks to all who replied. I checked my 2 out opening doors. I will have to check it out in more detail, but, apparently on door has non removable pins. The other needs some attention. I will probably put in a few of the "lock pins" to fix the problem.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
replying to ransley, Cyndi wrote:

Hello Mark, does your hinge screw work on just a regular wood door hinge. I was looking for a hinge with a lock and key so that the pins can't be removed from my office into my apartment. Please reply, thank you, Cyndi
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/16/14, 7:44 PM, Cyndi wrote:

The 2 of the 4 screws shown on this webpage can be used on metal or wood doors. The #12 sizes have both machine threads and wood threads.
http://www.hardwaresource.com/hinges/DOOR+HINGES/Door+Hardware/Security+Stud+for+Hinges
pic of installed screw here
http://www.hardwaresource.com/images/products/Sec_Stud_Spec_Sheet.jpg
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.