High Cost of Keeping Hot Tub Ready To Go

Page 2 of 4  


Insulating and temperature drop during daytime is going to be an easy experiment and a timer (depending on cost) will be another bonus.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Can't argue with anything you said, but sitting outdoors under the stars while soaking in a 103 degree pool of water is what it's all about for us. Indoors just wouldn't be the same.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

http://www.google.com/search?num 0&hl=en&newwindow=1&safe=off&rls=GGLG,GGLG:2005-52,GGLG:en&q=insulating+an+outdoor+hot+tub&spell=1
Thanks, will take a look. Maybe I can insulate it better than it is.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

That *IS* why they call it luxury.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Well, I am the one who acknowledged that it's a luxury. One we enjoy very much, but the cost of heating our home and our hot tub has become a burden to our non-increasing revenue.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bryan wrote:

I just thought of something. What temperature is recommended for safety? I understand that water temperatures play a big role in keeping the water sanitary.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 06 Mar 2006 19:27:53 GMT, "Joseph Meehan"

Everything I have read says that 15-minutes at 104F is the maximum exposure for a person in good health. Someone who is pregnant, has diabetes or heart problems should not be exposed to even that much. The problem, apparently, is that when you get the body to that high a temperature, the body loses its ability to shed heat. You can find a lot of information on the large spa equipment websites.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dick wrote:

I was thinking of microbe growth.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Nope, you don't use the temp to regulate microbe growth any more than you would with a swimming pool. The other problem with temps over 104 is that is about the temp where tender skin starts to be injured.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 06 Mar 2006 16:36:59 -0700, Dick <LeadWinger> wrote:

I would think that if the tub is above 98.6 the body would not be able to shed heat. I believe you. I just wonder how it works over those 5.4 degrees.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Without altering the system, in California, the tubs are limited to 104. It would take some cheating to break that factory barrier.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I am curious as to what sort of heating system your hot tub uses? I have connected power over the years for two types that use electricity for heating. One uses a 20 amp 120 volt circuit and heats the water only when the jets are not in use. This unit takes a longer time to heat the water from cold. The other type uses a 40 or 50 amp 220 volt line and heats the water up much quicker than the previous one that I mentioned. The heater can work with the jets going. Of course this type also consumes considerably more power. Or do you have a gas heater?
If you have the 220 volt model, I don't think it would be necessary to run the heater 24/7 although you may need to run the pump frequently for filtration purposes. You could try calling the manufacturer or distributor to ask them how long it takes for the water to get to your ideal temperature.
A couple of manufacturers used to make timers just for hot tubs, but I haven't seen any lately. I think solid state controls are taking over. Try doing a search for pool or hot tub time clocks. You could also check www.grainger.com or contact an electrical supply house. Take a look at www.tork.com and look up models 1100D and 1100FM under Special Purpose Controls.
John Grabowski http://www.mrelectrician.tv
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Insulate it better. There is a spray for the underside of the tub itself. Another cover for the tip is in order. Then keep it at 95, find out how long it takes to go from 95 to 103 and educate everyone on the fact they will have to turn it up ahead of time (and back down). The exact numbers here are hypothetical, but the cooler you keep it the more energy you will save.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Game plan: Optimize insulation. Turn down temp before work and turn it up after work. Find the lowest temp that still allows a reasonable return to 103. Manual or timer. Look into timers (will tend to forget manual resulting in frustration for all). Look into solar assistance. Build 2 sided privacy lattice for privacy and to optimize wind barrier. Reduce fast food consumption and use money to pay for heating.
Thanks to everyone with all the great ideas!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bryan wrote:

Bryan-
You're right on target for your game plan.
I just moved from a house with an above ground spa (SoCal)
& I sure do miss it! :(
Soaking in the spa looking up at the stairs was very nice. I thought I'd tire of it but I never did.
I used to turn the heater off when I was done with it for the night. I would turn up again a few hours before I wanted to use it. I just had to remember!
I don't remember ALL the details of the installation like heater power (kW) but it was ~500 gallons (a deep 6 person, ~8x8 spa)
but I do remember if it wasn't cold outside (<60F) the water never really got cold (just not good & hot)
& if it was hot outside the spa would pretty much stay usable (103) without turning the heater on.
If it was tempid (~90's) it would take ~2 or 3 hours to bring it up to "good"
If yours is really 300 gallons then each kW of heater capacity will bring your spa 1.4 degrees F per hour
I think mine was 5.5 kW & I had 500 gallons
so I could get ~ 5 degrees F per hour,
which was fine as long as I planned ahead (too lazy to do the timer)
but if I forgot..............no spa tonight :( ........or a tempid soak
The closer to ambient temperature you let the spa temp fall, the more electricity you'll save
If you've got a 3.3 kW heater you'll get about 5degs F per hour as well.
So I would suggest you kill the heater at night when you got to bed. The spa will probably "coast" long enough to do the midnight soak. (night time loses are greater than daytime) & fire it up a few hours (3 or 4) before you'll want it hot.
If you measure your water temp in the afternoon & you know when you want it ready & you know your heater kW you can predict how soon you need to turn it up based on heater kW
In a pinch I used to run both jet systems full speed to add to the heat (maybe another 20% capacity)
cheers Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Great information. I'll test out the 5 d per hour hypothesis. It sounds like our tubs are/were pretty much the same. I always wonder, though, does reheating the tub daily cost more than just maintaining the desired temp.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Think in terms of lower or higher AVERAGE temperature, and the answer becomes very obvious without even doing any math.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Well, you would think it's obvious, but if the heater is kicking on 18 times for 10 minutes (total 180 minutes) to maintain a given temperature versus running for 3 hours straight to come back to temperature, what's the mathematical difference? What I'm missing here is some information about how often and how long the heater kicks on throughout a given day to maintain the desired temp; so for now my numbers are imaginary.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

In our case, with the heater/filter running for two, one-hour cycles, we only lose a degree or two between cycles. Doesn't take long to get it back. I usually open the cover and turn on the pump, then go back in the house to change. By the time I get back, it's pretty close to temp. Even if it isn't, it will be shortly after getting in.
Dick
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

As I said, the only concept you need to consider is the AVERAGE temp maintained over time. It really IS that simple and obvious. If your AVERAGE temp over time is lower, your heater will be running less.
What you are "imagining" happening with your heater is not what is happening in reality.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.