Help needed with framing around concrete for drywall

Hi, please see the picture posted at the URL below.
http://www.gosea.com/basement/basement.jpg
I am trying to figure out how to frame the concrete portionof this wall. The above portion was drywalled by the builders when they sold it to us, the basement was supposed to be unfinished.
I have a few questions: - can I frame with strapping instead of 2x4 because of the clearance between the wall and the back of the heater - about 2", as you can see by the wood that is there holding it out - using construction adhesive with th ewood directly against the concrete, or do I need to - do I need to drill the concrete for screws instead (don't want to)
Some points: - concrete is above grade - sill on top of concrete is about 2" wide, clearance for pipe is about 2.5-3" - clearance behind heater is about 2"
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It appears that even if you frame with strapping, you will have the 2" for the strapping plus the thickness of the drywall. If I was doing the job, I build a frame that tied into the framing above the pony wall and join it to a footer adhered to the floor using ram or adhesive.
MZ

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You can use strapping, but make sure the drywall screws aren't too long as they will contact the concrete before tightening on the drywall.
The only way to do that properly would be to turn off that heater zone, remove the register and do it with 2x2's, connected to the above framing and ram set into the floor. This way everything will be neat and tidy - the first time.
Also, if you go that route, you can also get flexable heating pipes that would make the re-attachmant easier - except they need to be crimped with a special tool instead of solder.
Don't forget to insulate and vapor barrier also. Will seem pointless, but should be done.
T

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Thanks - to do that I would have to bleed the water out of the pipes, and I haven't a clue as to how to do that. It sounds like a job for a plumber...
I'll definitely vapour barrier and insulate, I just picked up some 3/4" pink exterior foam board. I also got some short screws.

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Salutations:

You need to cut the lower couple of inches off the current drywall and complete the vapour barrier to the floor. Toe nail/screw a couple of 2x8 out from the existing footer under the drywall to make a step header - then build a normal frame down to a new floor footer.
I would make sure that I had some thin foam board insulation under the pipe (you can mount the 2x8 in two sections to get around it).
Basically, you don't have to mount the 2x4 framing to the wall at all - you mount it to the header and footer - then just tack the footer to the floor itself extending the vapour barrier under it. This leaves room for insulation and circulation behind the frame.
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How important is circulation? Framing with 2x4 is not an option without bleeding the pipes, which is what I'm trying to avoid.
wrote:

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Phreak wrote:

attach 1" x 3" strapping with a Ramset or drill and use Rawl cement nails, vapour barrier and drywall. If the insulation panel will go behind the pipe, is it possible to leave the pipe in the space created by the 1 x 3 and under the drywall?
Happy hammering.
Bob
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On Sat, 15 Jan 2005 13:21:15 GMT, someone wrote:

Well, if you do, it may be more trouble than you save to work aroundn that heater.
But if you do - my take on it: (a) start with a PT board on top of that little concrete shelf, overhanging by just the right amount, this will be the top plate of the lower wall (tie it into the sole for the wall that is already above the concrete). (b) bolt or power nail a PT sill to your floor, rip it to be a "2x2" (1-1/2 by 1-1/2). (c) frame "on the flat" between the new sill and plate. (d) sheetrock.
Whatever. I'd prefer to remove the heater, do the job, then re-install.
-v.
Reply to NG only - this e.mail address goes to a kill file.
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On 1/15/2005 8:21 AM US(ET), Phreak took fingers to keys, and typed the following:

that 'step' in the wall, or do you want to have a flat wall from floor to ceiling? If it were me, I would want a flat wall. If you just want to cover the concrete, read this and make some adaptations to it that will be described below this text. I would lay a 1-1/2" x 1-1/2" plate on the floor along the base of the wall. You secure it to the floor in a number of ways. Since this is a non-bearing wall, you just want the base to keep from moving around. You don't have to use screws, you can use a concrete power nailer, or or hammered in masonary nails. You can also use a good panel adhesive to glue them down (I'd still use a nail or two, here and there). Make sure they are butted flush up to the wall. You can then nail a 2 x 4 top plate to the ceiling joists, or if covered by sheetrock, nail through the sheetrock into the joists with 3" nails (10d). Make sure the front edge of the top plate is plumb with the front edge of the base plate 1-1/2"s. Here's where a circular or table saw comes in. Determine whether you are going to have the studs 16" or 24" on center. Mark out the locations of the studs on the plates. Make sure you don't put a stud right where that pipe is. Measure your stud lengths to fit between the top and bottom plates. Cut to length, but leave a hair extra so the stud keeps pressure on the plates. On each stud, measure in 1-1/2" from the front at the bottom and then another 1-1/2" mark at the height of the concrete shelf. You are going to cut a notch out of the stud so that it is only 1-1/2" thick at the base up to the concrete shelf and the part above the shelf will remain 3-1/2" and will sit on the shelf. Use the usual toe nailing (8d) at the top of the studs into the top plate. For the bottom plate, I would use smaller nails and glue to secure the studs to the plate. You will have to use just glue behind that heater. You will have to move that outlet (and any others or switch boxes) out to the new framed wall. Now, insulate, if you want to. Use rigid foam between the studs in the concrete area. Use fiberglass above. Hang sheetrock and nail as usual. You'll have to skip that part behind the baseboard heater. Because we cut the floor plate and stud bottoms to 1-1/2", the 1/2" sheetrock will make 2", which is the amount of space you say you have behind the heater. Rough Drawing here: http://www.willshak.com/temp /
Just want to cover the concrete base? Leave the 1-1/2" base plate on the floor. Drop the 2x4 top plate to the concrete shelf. Toenail the 2x4 into the wall studs behind. Rip the 2x4s to get 1-1/2" x 1-1/2" pieces that will fit between the base plate and shelf plate. Face nail the short pieces through the top plate, and glue and toenail the bottom as described above. You can always continue the upper portion with 2x4 studs to get a flat wall later. Well, that's what I would do, but it would be my house. Others may have different opinions for use in other houses.
--
Bill

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Why not just mount the 2x4's sideways so that you only have 1-1/2" of depth the whole way. This should be sturdier and much easier than measuring and notching out half the depth of a 2x4.
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About 10 years ago I turned a garage into a studio apt. It had the exact problem that you have. I decided not to frame in the foundation lip. I taped the upper drywall and textured the entire thing, including the concrete. I then painted everything and made a piece of 2x2 wood molding that wrapped around the lip. It turned out much better than I would have thought before hand. After all of these years I have had no problems with the texture or paint on the concrete. You could spray texture and paint on the pipe, but I think that I would make some sort of nice wood box that ties into the heater to protect the pipe and stain it the same as the molding. The molding fits tight to the sheet rock but has about 1/4" clearance on the front of the concrete in some spots due to the run out in the sill plate where it is bolted to the foundation. You would have to use a mirror to see it.
It was a very inexpensive fix to the problem and really does look quite nice.
CR

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