Help, mathematically challenged

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If the ship is so dense, why does it float? Huh? . Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org . .
Another idiot weighing in----Your quote: "They (obviously you mean ships, right) are much less dense than the water they displace." You know just enough to be dangerous (and stupid). The density of water is 62.4 lbs/cubic ft The density of steel is approx 490 lbs/ cubic ft---- Got it???? Steel has a specific gravity of approx 7.8--you do know what SG is, don't you? Apparently you don't know enough about the current topic to jump in--best to keep your mouth shut so you don't look so foolish. Because you need some help--"Archimedes"--Ever hear of him???? MLD
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On Sun, 5 May 2013 20:06:46 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"
He's certainly too dense to float.
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On 5/4/2013 12:38 PM, MLD wrote:

Because the pound of feathers is attached to a duck...and everyone knows ducks float?
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Hm-m-m, a duck in a bag?? How about all the feathers (in a bag) after they have been removed from the duck?? MLD
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w if

It fits into the spaces between the molecules of water. Up to a point.
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On Sun, 31 Mar 2013 09:38:51 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Why would it have to be water??? Are oil gallons a different size??
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On Mar 31, 5:38 pm, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

If it's anything it's 35 (US) gallons.
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On Fri, 3 May 2013 23:29:59 -0700 (PDT), harry

It took you a month to round 34.9 to 35?
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On Fri, 3 May 2013 23:29:59 -0700 (PDT), harry

If all else fails, fill a one gallon jug with water and pour it in. Repeat this until the tank is filled.
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On 3/31/13 12:18 PM, RBM wrote:

35 gal is correct. 1 cu ft = 7.48 gallons
28x18x16 = 8064 cu in 8064 div by 1728 cu in per cu ft = 4.6 cu ft 4.6 cu ft x 7.48 gal/cu ft = 34.4 gal
13x12x18 = 2808 2808/1728 = 1.625 1.625 x 7.48 = 12.155 gal
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On 3/31/2013 12:41 PM, Retired wrote:

Thanks for the help
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This does all sort of tanks http://www.greertank.com/tankcalc.htm
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RBM-
Both are correct...
~12.2 gallons & ~34.9 gallons
For reference the key for an easy calc is ...... 231 cubic inches per gallon
12" x 13" x 18" = 2808 cbiuc inches
2808 cubic inches / 231 cubic inches per gallon = 12.2 gallons
cheers Bob
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Someone might ask whether the decimal system is easier ...
--
Best regards
Han
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Decimal? The only arithmetic needed is decimal. I didn't use binary once. ;-)
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Some kids learn it earlier, some learn liter in life. . Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org . .
Someone might ask whether the decimal system is easier ...
--
Best regards
Han
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This is America where nothing changes.
One cubic meter of water = 1000 litres = one metric ton 00Kg
I'm surprised no-one though to change it to "cups"
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On Friday, May 3, 2013 11:33:44 PM UTC-7, harry wrote:

d

to

a

12

Somebody tried:
http://sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash3/p206x206/63039_492221994173917_1 169409478_n.jpg
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On 03/31/2013 09:18 AM, RBM wrote:

You can do math using the google search field; in your case, it would be "x cubic inches to gallons", where "x" is the product of 28x18x6.
To put this all into one line, you could use the following syntax:
(28 * 18 * 6 ) cubic inches to gallons
Jon
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First, the approximation:
The larger tank is about twice as long, and 1.5 times as wide, as the smaller one, while their heights are about the same -- so one would expect that its capacity is about 2 x 1.5 = 3 times that of the smaller tank. If the smaller one is around 12 gallons, you should expect the larger one to be around 36, which matches well with the claimed size of 35.
Now the exact calculation:
28 x 18 x 16 = 8064 cubic inches. There are 12 x 12 x 12 = 1728 cubic inches in a cubic foot, so 8064 cubic inches is 8064 / 1728 = 4.67 cubic feet.
One cubic foot is about 7.5 gallons, so 4.67 cubic feet = 35 gallons.
Your smaller tank is 13 x 12 x 18 = 2808 cubic inches = 1.625 cubic feet = 12.2 gallons.
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