HELP! Halo Recessed Lights - Heat Loss through Fixture is HUGE!

I am officially at the begging stage... Here's my story:
Bought a house with 30 Halo 6" recessed cans, H7's. Cathedral ceilings throughout the house. I can not get "behind" any of these fixtures. The cans are original installs, which means they are not the retrofit models... they have a large frame around the cans. They are NOT air-tite, and are NOT insulation contact rated. They are, unfortunately, the cheapest Halo 6" recessed cans the electrician could have installed 12 years ago. When you put your hand near these things you feel WIND... not air movement.... WIND. There is insulation in the roof, just not near the cans.
I NEED TO STOP THIS AIR FLOW! but, I have no desire (read: wife says no) to rip out the sheetrock and original H7 fixtures and rebuild my entire ceiling. Plus, its too expensive.
SO, what can I do? I know they make Insulation contact rated remodel fixtures, but I can't get the original fixture out of the ceiling. I can remove the can itself though, but the frame and round bracket are still up there. I thought of trying to take the can part of the fixture out and put the airtite remodel version up there, but I don't know if it will fit through the frame. Anyone have experience with this?
Also, I see they make an airtite Eyeball kit, the 78PAT (for almost 30 bucks!) which has a gasket around it... perhaps using this airtite eyeball to replace the existing non airtite eyeballs will help the situation?
While I would love to get insulation up there around the cans, I will be happy with just stopping the air loss. 30 cans times 3-4 CFM of air movement is causing doors to move on their own.
Can ANYONE offer suggestions, or, preferably, EXPERIENCE stories on what to do in this situation?
Thanks much!
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If the ceiling is flat, you can use the 30 wat or 30 pat trims which are airtite. They are supposed to be used with the ic housing, but if the insulation is not around the frames, I don't see that it would matter. They're still gasketed and airtite. If you need eyeballs, the number you mention should work. With these airtites, you pull the bracket out of the fixture and mount the socket right to the trim. The trims are secured by expanding wire clips that fit into those little side pieces which may have been pushed in to accommodate the trims you have now

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Thanks for the reply. The ceilings are all angled, so they all use Eyeballs. I do have a few flat ones that will get the 30PAT trims, which seem quite easy to come by. I made several phone calls to electrical supply houses and they have never heard of the 78PAT, but it shows on Cooper's Halo page. This must be a fairly common problem, and someone could make a fortune selling retrofit air-tite kits for these eyeballs. I would even consider flourescent lights in there, if need be.
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I know exactly what you're saying. I'm in New York, just outside the city. Where you have insulated ceilings,you must use airtite trims and yet every time I need them, I've got to special order them. Must be a lot of cheatin going on

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Yeah, I think that's what happened here... if you do the math, I am losing more heat through these lights than by leaving a door open.
I just went to the electrical supply house, they special ordered 26 78PAT trim kits for me. Should take a few weeks to get them in. Hopefully, I will be able to get them all in by mid-January.
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