Hardening outside phone line for alarm system

Page 1 of 4  
We are installing a centrally monitored, wired alarm system in our house.
I noticed that the Network Interface device sits unprotected at waist level on the outside of the house. Even more concerning, the phone line enters and exits the box unprotected.
Other than paying for a radio link backup, what is the best way to "harden" the phone line?
- Would it make sense to encase it in electrical conduit at least until the wire is out of reach?
- If so, What type of conduit and fittings should one use so that it is both sufficiently tamper-proof and weather resistant?
- Any other suggestions?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Depending upon where the inside hydro panel is located, it might be best to dig down about two feet underground and drill through the basement wall, and remount everything inside the house. Although this can cause some inconvenience later when the telco has to visit to repair the local loop from the GWI to the house, it's nothing compared to the "inconvenience" of being broken into and having the monitoring non functional......
R.H.Campbell Home Security Metal Products Ottawa, Ontario, Canada www.homemetal.com

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
R.H.Campbell wrote:

It is likely bet to check with your phone company first. However I suggest rather just moving it all in side, that it would be better to leave it all there. Bring the hot line inside as you suggest to a new box and run a new wire underground to nowhere. That way someone would think they have it and stop looking when in reality they just killed a dead line.

--
Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'm dealing with the same issues right now, and am still having trouble with "hardened" or secure phone lines. There will be a weakness somewhere, whether it is at the entry point to your house or somewhere else between your house and the phone company. If you're a thorough theif, I assume you'd find and get into the green access box for the area and kill the line there. That way, you don't even have to worry about what you encounter at the premise itself.
Or maybe I'm just paranoid.
Brian.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

system in place. I always assumed if the line was cut or disconnnected they called a friend or neighbor to investigate. Something of that nature. My buddy had his set up so that it also rang his cell phone if anything suspicious was going on.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
cyberdock wrote:

If the line's cut, how's it gonna call?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

system in place. I always assumed if the line was cut or disconnnected they called a friend or neighbor to investigate. Something of that nature. My buddy had his set up so that it also rang his cell phone if anything suspicious was going on.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Sir, no, not paranoid; just not being totally realistic given the nature of residential burglary.
If you were dealing with a commercial warehouse situation containing hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of valuables, then I might be inclined to think as you do. However, the average house thief is one step up from an ant in intelligence and resourcefulness, and is far from a professional looking for a big commercial score. You give the average house burglar far too much credit ! He is far more likely to just kick in the weak strike of your front door, alarm or not, grab what he can, and run like hell. The alarm only means he might pass you by, or at the very most, spend less time in the home given that authorities could well be arriving shortly.
Again, nothing in security is absolute ! However, with all of these things, you are playing the odds ! And if you harden ALL the entrance areas of your home (and not just the phone line), you are far less likely to be the victim of a robbery. These idiots are lazy and stupid, and are looking for a way into anyone's home, not specifically yours. After all, they can find the same things in just about any house along the street, so why would they spend time breaking into your home if it's more difficult to get in to at the onset, and there is a chance of discovery vis a vis a monitored alarm after that. In most cases, they'll simply move along and look for "easier pick'ins".....
Move the demarc block inside, or do what the other gentleman suggested, then stop worrying about that part of the defence system. Spend time and money on hardening the locks and strikes of your main doors against kickin, secure your patio door properly, harden your basement and other low lying windows against easy entry, and that will do far more to keep the thugs out than unduly worrying about the phone line at locations away from the house (in my experience and opinion)
Simply walk around your house and see how you would enter if you were a young burglar looking for an easy score ! You'll probably guess correctly ! Then do something about it right away. Remember, your alarm system is NOT your first line of defence; it's your second line, and your backup, if they get past your first line of defence - the physical perimeter of your house !
In the old days, they didn't put moats and walls around castle communities for nothing....
R.H.Campbell Home Security Metal Products Ottawa, Ontario, Canada www.homemetal.com

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
co-worker got woke a week ago by his neibor, someone had cut the neibors phoneline an attempted to break in to a window. The husband was away on business, I guess they may have though both were gone. Luckly she had a cell phone and called 911 when she heard a noise outside.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Not sure what underground has to do with it. The real problem in my mind is not the location of the box but the fact that a clearly exposed wire runs down the side of the house from the telephone cable above to the place where the wire enters the basement (independent of whether the network interface device is inside or outside). Does that makes any sense?

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Yes, I see that on a lot of older homes. I don't have a proper answer to give you, nor a good way to actually harden the line in that situation. My only suggestion would be to reroute the cable into the house higher up at the second floor, but then you have the added difficulty of going from the upper floor to the basement inside the home.
Perhaps your best bet would be to consider one of the wireless backup communication solutions...
RHC
writes:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jeffrey J. Kosowsky wrote:

My father, the locksmith had an answer that seems to make sense to all security issues.
The bad guys are lazy. That is why they are the bad guys. You only need to make your home less of a target than the home next door to avoid the problem. That means make it look like it will not be all the profitable to rob (no nice looking things visible) or make it look harder to get in safely.
I had a wealthy neighbor with lots of valuable art pieces etc in his home. However you could not see any of it from the outside and the outside of his home always showed considerable need of maintenance. Outside it was the shabbiest home around, but inside it was a wonderland. He never got hit.
I have been hit twice in 50 years. Someone store some tools out of my car (I was working on it under the dash at the time) and once they tried to get in a window. My cat jumping out of bed and into the hallway did the trick that time. I saw the flash light shine on the cat and everything got quiet. I called the cops who caught up with them at the next corner and found the minor damage to the widow. That window was the most hidden possible entrance to the home.
--
Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@consult.pretender (Jeffrey J. Kosowsky) wrote in message

I would suggest leaving the existing wiring exposed.
Add a conduit from box to house to carry the real, "live" phone wires. A burglar may be smart enough to cut the phone line first, but it won't be the actual phone line.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com (P.J. Hartman) writes:
] snipped-for-privacy@consult.pretender (Jeffrey J. Kosowsky) wrote in message
]> Not sure what underground has to do with it. The real problem in my ]> mind is not the location of the box but the fact that a clearly ]> exposed wire runs down the side of the house from the telephone cable ]> above to the place where the wire enters the basement (independent of ]> whether the network interface device is inside or outside). Does that ]> makes any sense? ]I would suggest leaving the existing wiring exposed.
]Add a conduit from box to house to carry the real, "live" phone wires. ] A burglar may be smart enough to cut the phone line first, but it ]won't be the actual phone line.
Around here the "box" is high up on a "telphone pole" (well it carries hydro-- electricity to those south of the border-- as well). Ie, there is no ground level box. You have to run the phone line either down the telephone pole, which is the telephone company's property and they really do not like you fooling with it-- or down the house.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bill Unruh wrote

Where do you live, Hooterville?? js
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 16 Nov 2004 19:31:24 -0800 "alarman" used 12 lines of text to write in newsgroup: alt.security.alarms

I'm trying to figure out how Mexicans use water "hydro" for electricity.
--
-Graham

Remove the 'snails' from my email
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It's called a "dam"
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Damn. That's funny.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Not sure what part of the above you are referring to, but in much of the Northeast telephone wires come in on "telephone poles" and the wire goes aerially to the drop on the side of the house...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Up here in Canada, we refer to "hydro" as the electrical plant
ie: "How much was our hydro bill this month...."
.......or...........
"where does the hydro come in the house...."
And our power supplier is called Ottawa Hydro
RHC
writes:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.