Hanging frameless kitchen wall cabinets

Page 2 of 2  


re: "As far as the next homeowner or contractor goes , once they poke a hole it will be apparent what is going on considering how common it is...At least around here."
I'd like to hear just how common it is. I've never heard of it before, but that doesn't mean it isn't common so don't jump on me for saying that.
RJ brought up the rest of the things that I thought of but didn't mention.
The 1/2" less floorspace doesn't seem like that big of a deal, but the door and window depth could. Wouldn't you need different (non- standard?) trim for any openings on that wall?
Earlier you said "Depends on the value of your TIME I guess" and added that the cabinets would go up very quickly. Wouldn't some of the "timed saved" be eaten up by the inefficiencies of having to deal with trim work that is different from every other wall in the house?
I'm looking at the wall in my kitchen, where only 2/3 is covered by cabinets. Let's go all the way back to when the house was being built. Assuming the situation you mentioned where you don't know exactly where the cabinets are going, they would have had to either put 1/2 ply on the entire wall or extra 1/2 drywall where they were sure the cabinets *wouldn't* go. Now, unless they're using 1/2" drywall everywhere else in the house, that's more "one-off" material that needs to be available, possibly resulting in more waste.
Obviously, you've dealt with this practice, but it's very foreign to me and I just keep thinking of all the implications of doing it. Not arguing...just making conversation.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
---

re: "As far as the next homeowner or contractor goes , once they poke a hole it will be apparent what is going on considering how common it is...At least around here."
I'd like to hear just how common it is. I've never heard of it before, but that doesn't mean it isn't common so don't jump on me for saying that.
RJ brought up the rest of the things that I thought of but didn't mention.
The 1/2" less floorspace doesn't seem like that big of a deal, but the door and window depth could. Wouldn't you need different (non- standard?) trim for any openings on that wall?
Earlier you said "Depends on the value of your TIME I guess" and added that the cabinets would go up very quickly. Wouldn't some of the "timed saved" be eaten up by the inefficiencies of having to deal with trim work that is different from every other wall in the house?
I'm looking at the wall in my kitchen, where only 2/3 is covered by cabinets. Let's go all the way back to when the house was being built. Assuming the situation you mentioned where you don't know exactly where the cabinets are going, they would have had to either put 1/2 ply on the entire wall or extra 1/2 drywall where they were sure the cabinets *wouldn't* go. Now, unless they're using 1/2" drywall everywhere else in the house, that's more "one-off" material that needs to be available, possibly resulting in more waste.
Obviously, you've dealt with this practice, but it's very foreign to me and I just keep thinking of all the implications of doing it. Not arguing...just making conversation.
You would do the whole wall in plywood with drywall over it....Windows require an extension jamb anyway and that one would be 7/16" wider..No extra work...The door (if you didn't ORDER the right jamb size) would need an extension jamb..Which would take a few minutes but would still be easier than hunting for nailers while holding cabinets up...If the door went to the garage , as is often the case , it would already be an abnormal wall (sheathing and 5/8 drywall on the garage side)that would need to be ordered or an extension jamb ripped anyway...No extra work..The rest of the trim is the same....Not a finish carpenter but that part seems cut and dry..Maybe Ric will chime in.....As I keep saying , I'm just passing on what some of the pro's do around here , and to me atleast , sounds easier...I just do the drywall part...Except at home ofcourse...LOL...I made extension jambs for my new windows and trimmed them out ...Doors too but they didn't need extension jambs....Piece of cake.........
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Will 4 screws ( 2 top/2 bottom) into studs be enough for a 36 wide by 30 high wall cabinet ?
---
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
--- "Will 4 screws ( 2 top/2 bottom) into studs be enough for a 36 wide by 30

Depends on whether you plan on filling it with canned goods...Is it a stand alone ???
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

What type and size of screws?
R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
2" screws into studs
---
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If those are drywall screws, no, I wouldn't trust them, and they're too short anyway. The holding power of a screw is dependent on the type of screw (for screw material strength - drywall screws are hard, brittle and don't take shear or impact well), the size (gauge) of the screw, and the depth of penetration into the stud.
R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.