Hacksaw Blades Orientation ?

Hi,
Was looking at the Home Handyman magazine, and mentioned was the below. This is a bit lengthy, so bear with me.
Someone questioned about how to install a hacksaw blade, forward or backward, and said his two reliable sources told him it didn't matter. Family Handyman said the sources weren't so reliable; the blades should be forward.
Guess my question is twofold: I took a look at the saws that I have, (I was curious, not just with the hacksaw), and none of them appear to have blades facing forward or back. They all look to be facing downward, so what is the magazine talking about here?
Also, if the blades are installed facing forward, doesn't that impede progress when pulling the blade back? You move a saw forward and back, not in just one direction, of course ? So, if the blades were facing forward, they would be tougher to pull back, no?
So, how should hacksaw blades be oriented, please ?
How about wood type saws also, since we are on the subject ?
Much thanks, Bob
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They're talking about which direction the teeth are pointed.

??? Not sure where you're going with this. It should be obvious that if the teeth are pointed forward, it will be more difficult to move the saw forward, because that's the cutting stroke. Moving it backward is just pulling it back into position to begin another cutting stroke.

Whichever way works best for you. Usually, that's with the teeth forward; the steel frame of the hacksaw is more than strong enough to keep sufficient tension on the blade even though you're pushing it through the cut.

European and North American wood saws have thick, heavy blades with the teeth pointed forward, and cut on the push stroke. Asian (especially Japanese) wood saws have thin, light blades with the teeth pointed backward (toward the handle) and cut on the pull stroke. Take your pick.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote in wrote:

Sortta like do you pull or push the caulking gun. The object you are working on doesn't really care.

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Doug Miller wrote:

Hook, line and sinker, Doug.
Jeff
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Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat \'57 EE)
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Robert11 wrote:

I install mine with teeth pointing downward.
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My current hacksaw blade has a notation on it, that says "this end forward" with an arrow. I too saw the Handyman article and checked my hacksaw and blade. Perry
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Robert11 wrote:

My DIY book says "teeth pointed away from the handle". My permanent wood saws are the same. Both cut on the forward stroke.
Frank
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for wood saws,there are both push type blades,and pull type blades,the only difference being the direction the teeth are oriented.Japanese saws are pull blades,they can be made thinner,the tension keeping the blade straight,and thus cut easier with a narrower kerf.A push-cut blade has to be thicker to stay straight. On a hacksaw that tensions the blade with the frame,it doesn't matter which way the teeth are oriented,you can set it they way you prefer. Most people use it the push-cut way. On the non-cutting[return] stroke,you are -supposed- to lift the blade so as to not wear the teeth(just like a file). Most people don't lift on the return stroke.
--
Jim Yanik
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I don't think you're allowed to ask about blade orientation. This is a "don't ask, don't tell NG".
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Where's the guy who says, "LOOK IT UP IN GOOGLE YOU DUMB ASSHOLE"?
Fact is, the article was probably written by someone who got fifty bucks for writing it, and doesn't know anything about the subject. Sounds like it.
I have used a hack saw many a time in my life. Sometimes, it's in tight obstructed spaces where for some reason changing everything has a great advantage. Have you ever disassembled a hack saw, put it around what you want to cut, turned the blade upside down (cutter in one direction because that's the way you get the best stroke), and then assembled it with it purposely wrapping around the cut piece?
If you answer no, you don't have the experience to even comment on this subject.
If hacksaw blades were meant to go only one way, they'd be manufactured like SawZall and jigsaw blades. You CAN put those in backwards, but you really have to work on it, and usually realize there's something wrong before you power it up.
You can use a hack saw any old way you want. You just have to look at it and see which way the blade is set to cut, or you will work up a sweat quickly. They DO work forward, backward, right side up, and upside down. You can even buy little tiny ones for short work.
Positioning varies with each job. And with wood saws, you can't usually turn the blade around, hence backsaws.
Steve
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wrote:

In reality, it doesn't matter. One way you cut on the push stroke, the other way on the pull stroke. My hacksaw blade cuts on the push stroke. My dozuki saw cuts on the pull stroke, but all other saws cut on the push stroke.

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