Gray water leachfield

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Utah.
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wrote:

Do the math. There is no point of bringing in air that is anything less than 80 degrees or thereabouts to make it feel "cool". The containers absorb and radiate a lot of heat from their steel after being in direct sunlight for 14 hours or so. A squirrel cage would simply move warm/hot air around. I have had interior temperatures of 135 degrees, with outside temps at 108.
We are finishing putting the trusses on. Lots of attachment points, plus a superstructure in the middle that doubles as a hoist. When we deck it out, it may still be hot enough to try the water idea thing, but I'm sure that is the way I will go. Then an evaporative cooler for each container, vented to outside.
I once had a 1400 sf workshop for my business. The AC unit could not cool down all the steel in there without running 24/7. So, I got one of the roll arounds. But then, taking inside humid air, and trying to evaporate water with it isn't efficient, and made it as humid as Houston inside the shop.
Time and experimentation will tell. I'm going to insulate a room within the container with some very good insulation, and put a window unit in there for brew space. I only need to keep it at 75 for a week or so, and that can be done with any small 110v. air conditioner, even the smallest. 640 CUBIC feet at most.
Steve
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On Mon, 1 Aug 2011 11:34:38 -0700, "Steve B"

Any practical way to shade the containers? Speaking of squirrel cage fans, until my son picked this up for 5 bucks at a rummage sale, I didn't know how neat they are. (Amazon.com product link shortened)
This little sucker really pushes some air. About 3 times as much as a similar powered "normal" box fan. He uses it for working on cars and I've been using it to dry the basement after getting flooded. Ther'e even better Lasko branded fan like this.
--Vic
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On 7/30/2011 10:58 PM, Steve B wrote:

The law of unintended results states: Whenever a government gets involved with any human activity, it can always be counted on to turn it into a complete cluster coitus. ^_^
TDD
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On 7/30/2011 10:58 PM, Steve B wrote:

Oh yea, I hope you didn't give them your name and address or any way to find you. You may have a group of armed feds show up at your door to take you away for having an unauthorized toxic storage site. The chances are the government would take your home and property. I know that many people would think it paranoid but remember all the American citizens who've been killed by government agents over some asinine law. I don't tell anybody anything when it comes to a possible violation of any government regulation or law. I will inquire about it or research it discreetly, especially if there is some reward program in existence for turning in violators. TELL NO ONE!
TDD
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DId you check in with the County and/or City? Both in my area have haz mat disposal areas that are relatively easy to find and have decent hours (even Sat. morning).
--
People thought cybersex was a safe alternative,
until patients started presenting with sexually
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Steve B wrote:

Some people think it is beneficial for the storm-sewer system to be "lubricated."
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Bob F wrote:

At least that's what they want you to think.
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wrote:

They burn the trash (and the recycle) here in a waste to energy incinerator. I imagine a little oil in there will just make the fire a little hotter for a second.
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Apparently, you do not live in my hood. Leave a milk jug labeled "old oil" next to the recycling bin, and you will return to find same.
The next amnesty day is in October.
Steve
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Bob F wrote:

Some say most "problems" in society are the result of failed, upstream, liberal "solutions" to other problems (which are still problems).
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What total nonsense. It would not be poisoning the earth anymore than a similar leach field from the millions of homes with septic systems. As for graywater, in some areas it's actually OK and encouraged to capture and use for lawn watering and similar.
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First, while septic systems break down human and other organic waste, I seriously doubt they are going to break down many harmful chemicals. If I pour benzene or paint contain lead down a toilet, explain how a home septic system is going to break that down.
Second, the issue in question is for grey water from a room used to make beer. Exactly what does that have to do with harmful chemicals? Apparenty you are unaware that some municipalities are encouraging the capture and use of grey water for things like lawn watering. my toilet, tell us how that is going to be broken dow
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Where are you located ?
Do your state regulations consider grey water to be sewage ?
Your county permitting process for installing a septic system would have to be followed, every state regulates this sort of thing...
It sounds as if you need to look into the state laws on this to see if grey water is considered sewage and would have to have the full gamut of pre-install permitting and soil perc testing before you can start digging...
It also sounds to me like you want to carefully consider where you locate this grey water discharge system as if it is too close to your septic system discharging all of the soaps, sanitizers and the like can affect your black water septic system as those sorts of chemicals tend to kill the bacteria in the septic system which process the waste...
I have not done this before but have observed the process through attending hearings where septic system designs were considered and approved after hearing the reports from the perc testing and the hydrologist's report on the conditions of the water table and aquifer in the area...
Advice: Seek out an expert in the design and permitting in septic systems in your state -- you might be an early adopter of a grey water system... In no case should you be digging trenches and putting a system in by yourself without a permit... YOU may know what that drain should be used for but will future owners or users of your property know that your homemade and un-permitted grey water system doen't have a septic tank and therefore shouldn't have certain things drained into it ?
Suggestion: Same as advice only with the addition that you should seek out environmental type water conservationists in your area and see what advice they have, what licensed experts they recommend you get design advice/assistance from and perhaps they might know of how to apply for special permitting...
Good Luck...
~~ Evan
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Typical. The guy has some basic grey waste water from a small room where he makes beer. And you make a big deal out of it. I suppose instead of using it to water some grass or plants he should hire an environmental engineer.
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Check county codes for installing a dry well.
JImmie
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wrote:

Hold your phone calls, folks. We do have a winner.
Thanks, Oren. My sediments exactly. I was asking more along the lines of construction techniques, but guess everyone went off on a legal tangent. Forgiveness is easier to get than approval.
Steve
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Putting in a dry well is the frkin' simple part...a hole in the ground with rocks in it. The trouble you can get in to if its regulated can be a real PITA. You will wish like hell you sought approval if it is ever questioned because the burden of proof will be on you to prove you did no harm and that can be expensive.
Jimmie
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Bull...
When you dump something on the ground, it has to leach through the topsoil and subsoil layers before it can get into the aquifer...
When you dig a below the ground leaching field, you provide a direct to the water table means of access for whatever you are discharging...
Something which may not be harmful in the concentrations which survive the UV exposure when they are flowing across the surface of the ground and whatever portions successfully penetrate the layers of soil between daylight and groundwater could potentially pollute the aquifer when you directly inject them into the ground...
This is why septic and drainage systems require permits and hearings... You aren't the only one using the ground water in your area -- but if you want to create your own "plume" of something and become one of the EPA's most wanted -- go for it... The lawsuits from everyone who owns land within a mile of yours and alphabet soup government agencies you have never heard of before won't cost that much, will they ?
Dry wells are in many places restricted to rainwater use only...
~~ Evan
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On 7/30/2011 1:03 PM, Evan wrote:

in my area, the water table is around 400' below the surface. there's not much difference between on the ground and 4' down.
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