Gorilla Glue / Polyurethane Glue Question

Hello,
I may be wrong, but I think that Gorilla Glue product is a Polyurthane glue. Correct ?
In any event, when would one use this Gorilla glue rather than, e.g., the typical 2 part epoxy ?
Would be for a wood project.
Thanks, Bob
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On 09/27/2014 4:39 PM, Bob wrote:

The original is polyurethane, yes. There is now a wood glue that is PVA.
The only reason to ever use the original for a wood glue is if must have fully waterproof glue, not just the ANSI tests. It isn't as strong as a PVA and has the other disadvantage that it foams on curing as well as does not clean up w/ water.
It has the advantage over PVA glues for bonding other materials where the PVA glues don't work but it's simply not of much real use for normal woodworking. It is somewhat cheaper and is of a little less bother than the two-part resorcinols, but I'll take one of them over it despite that because of the foaming nature that is such a pita.
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On 9/27/2014 6:08 PM, dpb wrote:

Correct and I don't think the polyurethanes have the stability of the other glues.
Gorilla glue sometimes comes in handy but my biggest complaint is that moisture absorption hardens it and makes it useless in the package. I think the bottle is polyethylene which is one of the worst barrier polymers for moisture, oxygen and CO2.
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On 9/27/2014 6:30 PM, Frank wrote:

I've learned to buy the smallest bottle. For just that reason.
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
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On 9/27/14, 7:48 PM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

I was disgusted when the first one hardened. Then I bought another. It's convenient. It seems flexible, which is good for some uses. The foaming seems to help it grab uneven surfaces.
The second bottle had a tapered metal stopper, but it, too hardened. If I ever buy it again, I'll grease the threads, to make them easier to unscrew and stop moisture from creeping in that way. That seemed to preserve some polyurethane shoe stuff I had.
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On 9/27/2014 5:39 PM, Bob wrote:

Yes.

When you have small gap that you don't have the ability to fix properly.

Special circumstances? A good PVA wood glue makes a joint stronger than wood itself to using a stronger glue is of little benefit. That said, if it is going to be submerged or in really west conditions, the epoxy or urethane may be better.
I've done hobby woodworking for a number of years and never used Gorilla glue, but I have used epoxy for some outdoor benches. I've also used Titebond 3 with good outdoor results.
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On 09/27/2014 5:38 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

But the polyurethanes are _not_ gap filling in any useful sense for such a purpose -- you'll end up w/ a porous mess blob with a bunch of tiny air bubbles, not a solid mass in the gap.
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On 09/27/2014 6:30 PM, dpb wrote: ...

Followup -- this is a "DAMHIKT" moment...way back when G-G was pretty new and all the rage of the TV commercials in the big initial blitz I thought it sounded as though it would be useful for the purpose and the missus had a cutting board she liked very well that had developed some problems.
Thinking the filling and the waterproof was a great combination w/ less hassle than epoxy or resorcinol Weldwood two part, I commenced to begin. It was a nightmare...had all glued up w/ mostly good joint w/ the exception of the location with the known gap that I ensured had sufficient to fill w/ some squeeze-out. As it began to dry/cure, it started foaming like a miniature insulation foam can spray and soon was a mess a-making. I've never used it since for anything but the odd repair job of mismatch material or the like for which it does serve a function.
I've been amazed at the exhibition of how a perception can be created and a product niche built from scratch almost purely by the strength of advertising that Gorilla did...they did pick a great trademark and ran a powerful media blitz and won...
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'Bob[_44_ Wrote: > ;3289392']Hello,

> glue.

> protection is active.

> anti-malware' (http://www.avast.com ) Bob:
Gorilla glue is just like so many other products; they don't stand out in any particular catagory.
For wood, white wood glue has the advantages that it dries clear for a nearly invisible repair. It's not very water resistant, and so you don't want to use it outside.
For wood, LePage's PL Premium construction adhesive has the advantage that it's about the strongest glue you can get for gluing wood, and it's completely waterproof, so it can be used outside.
LePage's has modified their PL Premium formulation to produce construction adhesives with higher initial tack, but so far as I know, the ultimate bond strength after curing is still the same as with the original PL Premium.
So, if you want an invisible repair, use white wood glue. If it's bond strength you're after, PL Premium is the way to go. Gorilla Glue is one of those other hundreds of adhesive products that doesn't stand out in any particular catagory.
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'Frank[_17_ Wrote: > ;3289410']

Give that a little thought. Polyethylene is what's used for vapour barrier in the walls of most buildings. They wouldn't use it for vapour barrier if it was as poor a barrier to moisture as you suggest. I expect what the problem is is that every time you open the bottle, you fill the container with more warm humid air and the glue gradually hardens up in small steps until it becomes unuseable.
I don't know whether Gorilla Glue is a moisture cure polyurethane or not, but if it is, then the trick to storing it for long periods is to put it in a place with negligible moisture content, and that means your fridge's freezer (best) or upside down in a container of motor oil. I've stored PL Premium both ways, and both ways work, but the freezer works best.
LePage's PL Premium is a moisture cure construction adhesive, and I keep it in my freezer between projects where I need it. I just "candy cane" it by squeezing a little bit of it out and immediately put it in the freezer. I only squeeze out enough that I can grip reasonably well.
The low temperature in the freezer both ensures minimal humidity levels in the air and minimal chemical activity so that whatever humidity there is in the freezer air doesn't react with the construction adhesive. The result is that the stuff will keep for a very long time under these conditions. The part that got squeezed out when I candy caned it will become hard because of the moisture it absorbed when squeezed out. But, I just put the cold tube in my caulking gun, apply pressure to the glue and pull the candy cane out, and the new glue will start to slowly come oozing out. Let it warm up, and it's ready to use again. I've stored PL Premium for well over a year in my freezer, using it periodically as needed, and it's still good to use now.
I expect the Gorilla Glue, if it's a moisture cure polyurethane glue could be stored equally well in a freezer.
I've also cut the top off an old milk jug and filled it about an inch full of motor oil. Candy cane a bit of PL Premium out of the tube and immediately put it upside down in the oil. The glue at the tip of the tube can't cure because there's negligible H2O content in the motor oil, and that prevents the glue from curing even at room temperature.
It's just a matter of understanding that the glue requires moisture to cure, and recognizing those places where moisture is all but completely absent.
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I've never tried Gorilla Glue, but have good luck with plain Titebond. I like the non-waterproof because if I make a mistake I can take it apart with a little misting of water. Yet it's very strong. But that's for smooth joints with good contact: Cabinet parts, moldings, etc. For contacts with gaps, like a chair dowel, or for use with resinous exotics, I like to use 5-minute epoxy.
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When you're trying to glue together a gorilla.

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