Goodbye 100w, 75w Incandescent Lamps

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The Nanny Geniuses in D.C. just passed legislation that, in addition to putting some serious "hurt" on our domestic car and light truck industry, kills off those outmoded, wasteful and environmentally DEVASTATING electric lamps we've all come to know and love.
Say "goodbye" to the venerable 100w and 75w, cheap, light bulb. (Thomas Alva Edison will surely turn over in his grave).
Stock-up and horde 'em now, folks. They'll be worth a LOT in 10-15 years on the black market.
I just switched all my exterior entryways and garage "eyebrow" fixtures to CF lamps. I am considering switching BACK the one beside the front door.
I rarely use exterior lighting. Mostly, I switch-on the front porch light when there is someone at the door - a rare occurrence.
On those occasions, I want IMMEDIATE light.
However, right now, it is 12F outside and that curly, compact fluorescent lamp outside, by the front door, doesn't provide usable light worth a damn for a minute or two.
With no apologies to anyone, I believe that switching to CF lamps won't, over the LONG "haul", provide a bit of "relief" to our ever-increasing energy consumption. Although that implies that our ever-increasing energy consumption needs relief, I am adamantly UNconvinced of that in any case.
The Energy Bill provided for NO new energy.
All the windmills, solar panels, methane plants and CF bulbs in the world cannot, and never will, provide for our energy needs. Conservation alone is NOT the answer, even IF there were a problem. We have adequate stores of fossil fuels to keep our grandchildren's grandchildren's grandchildren cool or warm and productive. Whether we can overcome all the hand-wringing, crybaby, do-gooders that think they're saving something by declaring wide swaths of our land "off limits" to fossil fuel harvesting is another matter.
We learned how to do it cleanly, neatly and with minimal environmental impact YEARS ago. But that's not good enough now. We simply CAN'T do it because of some PERCEIVED, detrimental environmental impact. That's B.S.
How about slashing the "red tape" and getting a few, new nuclear power generating stations on-line within ten years?
We should drill for oil and gas in ANWR (Alaska National Wildlife Refuge)?
Why do you think Seward talked Congress into buying Alaska?
Do you think he would have ever believed that there'd come a day when vast miles of it would be virtually off-limits to any resource harvesting?
Despite incessant impediments from environmentalists, the Tans-Alaska Pipeline was finally built. But, Shazam! The devastation to the environment and wildlife it was predicted to cause never happened. They were WRONG. They're wrong now.
CF bulbs and set-back thermostats are NOT the final solution, even if there was a problem. Heck, such measures aren't even a viable stop-gap.
We need more energy. Let's go get it. -Jim Redelfs
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Jim Redelfs wrote:

Look at this as an opportunity, not a problem.
One could invent a bulb heater that kept the CFL at operating temperature even when "off." I bet one could be made available for, oh, $35.00.
Find a market and fill it, I always say.
As a stop-gap, use Halogen or Sodium or Neon. Filaments are so quaint.
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I agree with the lighting outside. Until a better light comes along, I'm sticking with incandescent for fast light, but I've switched a couple of night lights already with good results. They last longer too, a bit plus.
OTOH, I'm all for changing over now. The quality of light is now good, not the greenish color it once was. I see no reason not to save my money and use something that operates cheaper. To do otherwise is kind of dumb. I'm looking forward to the LED lights in our future.
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My experience with CFL's has not been very good either and I agree that the govt banning incandescent bulbs is the wrong approach. And the advice to use halogen, sodium or neon makes no sense. How is JR supposed to screw a sodium light into a simple outside decorative door light fixture? Plus, I'm not sure what the legislation passed actually says, but I'd consider a halogen to be a type of incandescent bulb, as it relies on a simple hot filament that uses about the same amount of energy.
There are some apps where CFL's work well. There are others where they do not. I've put them in my garage and can put up with the slow light up time. I tried them in the kitchen with some FEIT indoor floods. First, they won't even fit because of the wider neck, so I had to buy an extender. Then they take a good couple mins to reach any reasonable brightness. Come into the kitchen at night and you can barely see for 2 mins. And then, despite the claims of how long they last, I've had 3 now fail after about 3 months of normal use. And yes, they are installed in and rated for the ceiling cans they are intended for.
So, I pay a lot more for them, yet they last a fraction of the time of a cheap incandescent. And they have a warning on them about containing mercury and to dispose of properly. Which means in the majority of cases, they are going straight into the landfill with the rest of the trash.
If the govt wanted to do something positive to get people to use them, they should require that manufacturers spec out the time they take to get to say 70% brightness. And stop pretending that they can be used anywhere.
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

You're right about the Halogen. What I'm planning is to go totally renewable.
I'm trying to find a lamp that uses whale oil.
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On Sun, 23 Dec 2007 03:28:42 -0600, Jim Redelfs

And say "Hello" to additional mercury compounds (from fluorescent tubes) seeping into our soils.
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Incandesants should be history, they are effectivly heaters that put out light, for every 100 watts consumed you get 92-94 watts of heat, real smart to use in summer when you run your AC to cool your home. CFLs will get better in cold starting, my cfl floods are bad needing 2 minutes at 25f to get bright, but that will change and color rendition is on par with incandesants. A ratings test at Popular Mechanics even put one brand better in rendition.
A quote from ComEd Ill. " If every home nationaly would replace one light bulb with CFLs this simple action would save more than $600 million in energy costs annualy and remove the equivalent amount of green house gases from the atmosphere that is created by 800,000 cars". And if 95% of incandesants were replaced utility companies would not need to upgrade power supplies for maybe 15 years saving everyone more.
And you say ""hurt" on our domestic car and light truck industry" Have you seen the new 20-21 mpg in CITY hybrid 4wd full size Chevys, and the 34mpg in CITY Ford SUV, what a better way to revive the industry by putting out a better Hybrid system that neither Toyota, Honda, or anyone else has, we should not be driving 12 mpg 4wd SUVs where nobody ever needs the 4wd option.
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Consumer Reports and Popular Mechanics magazine recently revieved CFLs with color rendition and start up times, I think Popular mechanics rated HDs brand very well, at the top , every year here ComEd subsides CFLs in Nov so you only pay 1$ a bulb I got quit a few. In can lights there are some special retrofits that work well but Halogens I agree are best.
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Consumer Reports and Popular Mechanics magazine recently revieved CFLs with color rendition and start up times, I think Popular mechanics rated HDs brand very well, at the top , every year here ComEd subsides CFLs in Nov so you only pay 1$ a bulb I got quit a few. In can lights there are some special retrofits that work well but Halogens I agree are best.
I'd love to find some recessed lighting that works with CFLs. I was at the BORG today, and all the recessed lighting used incandescents. I've almost switched to CFLs, and won't go back.
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Buck Turgidson wrote:

Most of those "incandescent" recessed fixtures will accept CFLs, they have adjustable socket position to accommodate the longer CFL base. I've also seen the true CFL recessed fixtures that take the pin based CFLs and have the ballast in the fixture at Depot.
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Phisherman wrote:

Supposedly the 75% power savings prevents more mercury emissions from coal fired power plants than the mercury contained in the lamp.
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wrote:

Then they want us to convert to electric autos... Using nuclear power plants will eliminate even more mercury emissions.
If anything,we should be converting our coal to auto fuels,and drilling in ANWR for more US oil.And buying from Canada.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
  Click to see the full signature.
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Jim Yanik wrote:

What we really should do is:
- Quickly build a number of new nuclear plants (which have a long safe emissions free track record)
- Shut down all of the emissions belching coal and NG plants
- Provide separately metered very low cost electricity for charging electric vehicles / plug in hybrids
- Provide low cost NG for commercial vehicles, providing an incentive to convert some of the critical trucking from diesel.
- Drill ANWR using the proven clean, safe directional drilling technology from a limited number of locations located at the edges of ANWR and having near zero environmental impact.
- Provide support for development of practical renewable resources as appropriate for a given area, without preferences that lead to impractical development that leads to construction of facilities for the initial subsidies and then subsequent write off of operating losses.
- Provide protection from baseless NIMBY lawsuits, baseless environmentalist lawsuits, HOA restrictions, etc. for development and installation of renewable facilities, both commercial and private.
Plenty more that should be done, but those are starters. Of course something like this starts to become a comprehensive energy policy, something our useless government (both left and right wings) can't manage to put together.
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wrote:

They passed a light bulb bill, I can't remember the other bill.
One Senator here is called "Pinkey" or something like that. The other one is a Veterinarian. Don't tell me I'm in luck!
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Pete C. wrote:

I am well informed supporter of nuclear power. Your immediately preceeding sentence tells me you are a cheerleader witout srious knowledge f the facilities.
Even with pebble bed technology, commercial power reactor construction is not somethingone does "quickly". You can have two of the following with rregad to any major engineering project: on time, on budget, or works, You choose.
And we'll wait while you Google pebble bed tehnology.
Plant siting is not solely effected by NIMBYs or BANANAs (Again, we'll wait while you Google BANANA.)
There are always serious seismic issues for any power plant, including windills, nukes, and tide generators. Ignore them at you peril
Nukes pollute as much as, but differently from, fossil fueled generators. The thermal pollution from nukes is far greater than with a similar mega wattage fossil plant. Particulate and gas emmissions with nukes are far lower.
"Spent" nuclear fuel has its own unique issues. The primary two, diversion and longeity, can both be dealyt with with acceptable risks.
Who is going to operate your nukes? Please don't say the IOPCs and their staffs (Again we'll wait while you Google IOPCs.)
Where is the capital to come from for building your nukes?

"...all..." You live in a fantasy world as extreme and as unconnected from reality as the Luddite anti nukers.

Screw ANWR, drill seriously in the Gulf of Texas and off the Northern California / Oregon / Washington coast. The reserves are there and the return is a lot quicker than ANWR.

What does rhat mean in English?

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wrote:

Not to complicate the issue, but a number of arms control experts have pointed out that there's only one way we'll stop "rogue states" from eventually developing nuclear weapons: Eliminate civilian nuclear power plants.
Every benefit comes with a hidden horror show.
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JoeSpareBedroom wrote:

Just shows you what pussies the so-called "arms control experts are."
Even I can think of a way to deal with "rogue states."
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Yeah, I'm sure you can think of a way, and it gives you a hard-on. Too bad your way doesn't involve a brain.
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JoeSpareBedroom wrote:

"Getting a hard on" is just a fringe benefit.
Killing the mopes is where it's at. It's in the Book.
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You should join your retarded cousin George in the White House.
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