Good bang/buck cordless drill?

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I'm assuming the cheaper cordless drills at Harbor Freight are disposable junk that will die in short order. Anyone have experience with them?
http://www.harborfreight.com/power-tools/cordless-drills/cordless-drilldriver-with-keyless-chuck-38-18-volt-68239.html
It's not clear to me what the difference is between the above model and this moderately more expensive unit. Both seem to have similar stats - 18v, 900 rpm, reversible, variable speed.
http://www.harborfreight.com/power-tools/cordless-drills/18-volt-3-8-eighth-inch-cordless-drill-with-keyless-chuck-67024.html
What would you consider to be the next tier for a cordless drill? Just light to moderate occasional home handyman use. What features do you think make a big difference?
Thanks for all input
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On 4/28/2013 7:04 PM, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

http://www.harborfreight.com/power-tools/cordless-drills/cordless-drilldriver-with-keyless-chuck-38-18-volt-68239.html

moderately more expensive unit. Both seem to have similar stats - 18v, 900 rpm, reversible, variable speed.

http://www.harborfreight.com/power-tools/cordless-drills/18-volt-3-8-eighth-inch-cordless-drill-with-keyless-chuck-67024.html

to moderate occasional home handyman use. What features do you think make a big difference?

These would probably make suitable backup drills. Nice when you need two drivers.
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On 4/28/2013 5:04 PM, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

http://www.harborfreight.com/power-tools/cordless-drills/cordless-drilldriver-with-keyless-chuck-38-18-volt-68239.html

moderately more expensive unit. Both seem to have similar stats - 18v, 900 rpm, reversible, variable speed.

http://www.harborfreight.com/power-tools/cordless-drills/18-volt-3-8-eighth-inch-cordless-drill-with-keyless-chuck-67024.html

to moderate occasional home handyman use. What features do you think make a big difference?

I've found HF tools to be acceptable for occasional use. Problem is that all the batteries seem to be CRAP.
Problem with occasional use of rechargeable tools is that they're always dead when you need 'em. NiCd's seem to short if left discharged forever.
So, you can leave 'em on the charger and guarantee the batteries die. Or you can plan ahead to charge before needed and hope they still work.
You can expect better results from high-end tools, but it's nearly impossible to tell without just trying it. They're optimized for contractor use where they're in continuous use. YMMV
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moderately more expensive unit. Both seem to have similar stats - 18v, 900 rpm, reversible, variable speed.

to moderate occasional home handyman use. What features do you think make a big difference?

LiIon batteries are much better in these regards but you aren't likely to find them in cheap tools. Life is too short to use cheap tools anyway.
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On Apr 28, 7:43 pm, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

v, 900 rpm, reversible, variable speed.

make a big difference?

Once you get the batteries charged, a charger on a timer for 10 - 20 minutes per day will keep them up without overheating and shortening their life.
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On Sun, 28 Apr 2013 18:53:55 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net"

this moderately more expensive unit. Both seem to have similar stats - 18v, 900 rpm, reversible, variable speed.

light to moderate occasional home handyman use. What features do you think make a big difference?

That's a good idea for NiCds, though not necessary for LiIons. I think I'll do that for my tools that still use NiCds.
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Great idea. I never tried my digital timer. The mechanical ones don't go that short. My lithium drill charger will charge in one hour. Some or most nicad chargers don't shut off. I had one that had a fixed charge interval, good old Kawasaki. They had problems with variable trigger switch, two, which I could have ordered replacement parts, but never did.
Greg
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moderately more expensive unit. Both seem to have similar stats - 18v, 900 rpm, reversible, variable speed.

to moderate occasional home handyman use. What features do you think make a big difference?

Exactly my experience. But I'm not convinced it's that the batteries are crap or that it's that the charger is crap and burns them up if you forget you put them on the charger. I know they get hot. I'm trying not to let that happen this time. The drill itself seems as good as 'better" quality ones I've had in the past.
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On 4/28/2013 8:26 PM, mike wrote:

Battery powered tools are pretty useless if the batteries are crap.

Not really, I haven't used one of my cordless drills in 3 months and it worked fine when I needed it. What you described is typical of lower end tools with cheap/old battery technology.
The other feature of good battery tools is they also come with better chargers that are able to charge quickly without destroying the battery.

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On 4/28/13 7:04 PM, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

drilldriver-with-keyless-chuck-38-18-volt-68239.html

eighth-inch-cordless-drill-with-keyless-chuck-67024.html

Light use drill/driver Best Buys: Hitachi DS14DSFL, Black & Decker LDX220SBFC
Cordless impact driver Best Buy: Hitachi WH18DSAL
General use drill/driver Best Buys: Hitachi DS18DSAL, Ridgid R86008K, Ridgid R9600, Craftsman 17310,
They have prices listed but I don't know how useful that would be. Amazon and Ebay might be good sources to check. A keyless chuck is handy. Some drills have a little level built into them. Those might be useful sometimes. Buy drill bits with one side beveled. That helps with the slippage problem. I found some Dewalt bits like that at Ace Hardware.
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http://www.harborfreight.com/power-tools/cordless-drills/cordless-drilldriver-with-keyless-chuck-38-18-volt-68239.html

http://www.harborfreight.com/power-tools/cordless-drills/18-volt-3-8-eighth-inch-cordless-drill-with-keyless-chuck-67024.html

The first looks more cool, and has bit more torque. Each seems to be lacking switch for gear ratio. Rpm too low for drilling. Compromised.
I use a sears lithium around $100 on sale. Lithium better, but after they die going to be costly to replace. I got a cheap nicad porter cable kit for backup. The kits were a good buy around $100 for hand saw, sawzall, and drill, two nicads. Nicads don't hold out as long as the outbound, but fine for occasional use.
Greg
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http://www.harborfreight.com/power-tools/cordless-drills/cordless-drilldriver-with-keyless-chuck-38-18-volt-68239.html

http://www.harborfreight.com/power-tools/cordless-drills/18-volt-3-8-eighth-inch-cordless-drill-with-keyless-chuck-67024.html

I would go with the Dewalt drills. I got one like this on sale for $ 100 a few years ago. When I was working we had a lot of them and they seemed to work very well.
http://www.grizzly.com/products/18V-1-2-Compact-Drill-Driver-Kit/T22352
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Per Ralph Mowery:

I went with Home Depot's "Ryobi" homeowner's house brand.
When one of two Li batteries failed (same purchase date, same use) and Home Depot didn't want to hear about it, I started thinking I should have gone with DeWalt - or at least with the HD commercial house brand ("Rigid"?).
OTOH, out-of-pocket for the replacement battery was about ninety bucks. Assuming that the failure was enough of an anomaly that I won't see another one, the decision would become whether the total additional cost of the higher-quality implements minus whatever they would have made good on the failure would have exceeded the replacement cost of the battery... (my scenario being occasional, not continuous use)
--
Pete Cresswell

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(PeteCresswell);3055123 Wrote:

"House Brands" are brand names that are particular to one chain store, like Sears "Craftsman" tools or Sears "Kenmore" appliances, or Lowes "American Tradition" paint. Neither Ryobi nor DeWalt nor Ridgid are house brands of any hardware store chain. They're all successful companies in their own right.
There was a time when both Black & Decker and Skil made top quality power tools. But, management over at Black & Decker decided there was more money to be made by expanding into housewares and lawn & garden equipment, and so they devoted fewer company resources to making quality tools and more to making toaster ovens and electric lawn mowers. When Black & Decker did want to regain it's reputation as a maker of quality tools about 20 years ago, they started a new company (called DeWalt) under which they would make and market tools aimed at the contractor and serious DIY'er market. Black & Decker still makes power tools, but they're aimed at the homeowner market, where the tool is going to be used only a few times a year when the homeowner decides to install a new curtain rod or mail box. Their DeWalt brand remains focused on the contractor and serious DIY'er market where the tool needs to be more robust to provide good service on a daily basis for years on end.
--
nestork

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On 4/29/2013 6:47 PM, nestork wrote:

My Black & Decker 12volt industrial cordless drill bought from WW Grainger in 1993 is identical to the DeWalt 12 volt drill now in production or recently produced. I believe that was before the divisions of the company switched markets. Oh yea, the hard plastic carrying case is identical except for the color and name. ^_^
TDD
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On Sun, 28 Apr 2013 17:04:56 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

moderately more expensive unit. Both seem to have similar stats - 18v, 900 rpm, reversible, variable speed.

moderate occasional home handyman use. What features do you think make a big difference?

I bought a Makita 18v LiON at Costco for about $70 with the smart charger and 2 batteries. This thing is a horse.
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If it were me, I would phone up the places listed under "Tools - Repairs" in your yellow pages phone directory.
The people that work at tool repair shops will know which Chinese cordless drills are junk and which ones are actually pretty good. And, they'll know which ones are made by the same Chinese companies that make Bosch or Milwaukee cordless drills (for example) cuz they use the same parts as Bosch or Milwaulkee drills.
--
nestork


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I was introduced to cordless drills, by a locksmith who provided me a job. We used Skil 2230, which lasted about two years before the batteries would fail to hold charge. We used them both for drilling 1/8 holes, and also with screw driver tip for turning screws. I remember the drill cost about $40 back in 1986, and the replacement set of batteries was about $25. Back when gasoline was maybe 80 cents a gallon. Min wage was 3.55 an hour, I think. So, a drill cost about 12 hours wage, before taxes. Now days that works out to about $93.
Not sure what it is, with HF. I have a couple of their 12 volt cordless drills, that keep going after years of use. The batteries slide off, forward. Don't think they make that kind of cell.
I bought one on clearance, that had 18 volt battery that drops out like a handgun pistol magazine. Howver, it has nearly no power. Got a couple of 18 volters from Ebay, also batteries that drop out towards the floor. They look same, but won't fit in each others charges. Also nearly useless in terms of power or life.
My other rechargable drills have included Black and Decker (which were OK) and Makita (which is good). . Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org . .
I'm assuming the cheaper cordless drills at Harbor Freight are disposable junk that will die in short order. Anyone have experience with them?
http://www.harborfreight.com/power-tools/cordless-drills/cordless-drilldr iver-with-keyless-chuck-38-18-volt-68239.html
It's not clear to me what the difference is between the above model and this moderately more expensive unit. Both seem to have similar stats - 18v, 900 rpm, reversible, variable speed.
http://www.harborfreight.com/power-tools/cordless-drills/18-volt-3-8-eigh th-inch-cordless-drill-with-keyless-chuck-67024.html
What would you consider to be the next tier for a cordless drill? Just light to moderate occasional home handyman use. What features do you think make a big difference?
Thanks for all input
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On Apr 28, 5:04 pm, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

900 rpm, reversible, variable speed.

ke a big difference?

Not sure about the 'bang for the buck', but my wife bought me a Rockwell 3Rill with lifetime batteries with maximum set of attachment tools. Small, lightweight fits in anywhere. Sometimes when in a hurry, item is small enough to simply slip down a trouser pocket to carry with hands full of other stuff up ladders. Came with two batteris and charges so fast have NEVER run out of portable power.
Now I find that HD carries more tools to use with it!
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