getting drywall to 2nd floor without a boom truck

No truck, no real steps, just pull down attic type. I can open up a 2'x8' bay of the gable end wall. Is there a fairly easy way to do this? It has to go up about 10.5'. Getting a boom truck will be tricky, no one wants to do it.
I have a drywall lift for installing drywall but I don't think it will go high enough. May have access to scaffolding... thinking of making steps across 2 sets of scaffolding. The scaffolding may be coming here anyway to do some stucco work. Any creative ideas?
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 16 Aug 2011 09:06:59 -0400, Tony Miklos

You need a "lull". That is basically a high lift fork truck with off road wheels.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Aug 16, 9:29 am, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

You didn't say what was under the opening. If they can drive the forklift under there then just pull the sheets in from the opening.
You can get an extension for most drywall lifts. I don't think I'd put a lift on top of scaffolding but someone has probably done it :-)
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/16/2011 10:13 AM, jamesgangnc wrote:

Under the opening would be a block wall. If it were lifted up with a forklift outside it could then be pulled sideways inside the building.
There will be 26 sheets of 8' 1/2" and 16 12' 1/2".
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Go to your local supplier and tell them you need it delivered to a 2nd story. And you have an opening. They will use a truck with a forklift on the back. Make it clear if you expect them to unload at the top or if you will have guys ready to do that. Make sure there is a clear good path to under the opening. If it's soft get some osb and lay it down.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

How much drywall are you talking about? The possible...errr....sensible solutions are dependent on how many sheets need to go up.
I work by myself a lot and I have a half ton chain hoist that can lift 10'. I've used that to bring up plywood and such, but never drywall. Don't see why it wouldn't work if you were careful about the sheet edges.
R
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/16/2011 9:47 AM, RicodJour wrote:

There will be 26 sheets of 8' 1/2" and 16 12' 1/2"
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 16 Aug 2011 10:49:56 -0400, Tony Miklos

To me, that begs the question-- is there ever going to be a real stairway to that space?
The lift is still the easier way to move that much drywall-- but drop down stairs seem like a temporary way to get to a space you're doing that much work on.
Jim
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/16/2011 9:06 AM, Tony Miklos wrote:

There will be 26 sheets of 8' 1/2" and 16 12' 1/2"
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 16 Aug 2011 09:06:59 -0400, Tony Miklos

How much and how big? If you only need like 12 sheets of 1/2" 4x8 up there and only one or two will end up full sheets-- then stage it downstairs- cut it and carry cut sheets up one at a time.
I work alone & that usually works for me. Leave the sheet on the trailer - cut & carry. Keeps the mess inside down - keeps the stuff out of the way & I get my exercise in smaller batches.
Jim
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/16/2011 9:06 AM, Tony Miklos wrote:

Nobody else asked, so I will- you are finishing (presumably for living space) an area without a real stairway? Is adding one part of the project plans? Pull-down steps aren't rated for fire egress from living(especially sleeping) space in any area I am aware of.
Just sayin'
--
aem sends...

Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/16/2011 9:00 PM, aemeijers wrote:

I fully understand. There are plans for an outside stairway but it takes me forever to make decisions, the main one being exactly where to put the outside door. The room is above my garage and for now it would just be storage, but I hate to have the room get full of junk and then try to hang sheetrock, tape and spackle around all the stuff that will undoubtedly find it's way up there.
Down in the garage is my "man cave" and the girlfriend says she'd like the upstairs to be her "woman cave". Ha ha ha, right. That will be the 2nd story of my man cave... the wood shop.
Anyway, it will not be much of anything until the outside steps are in.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/17/2011 6:59 PM, Tony Miklos wrote:

1 car or 2 car garage? What size are the joists? 10 foot span, they need to be at least 2x8, IIRC, on 16 centers, to be rated for more than light storage. In my part of planet, that is rare. If a 2 car garage, I hope you have a centerline beam, even with 2x10 joists,
Somebody that can do the deflection math in their head will be along shortly to correct me- I'm no engineer, my 'gut feelings' about these things, are based on how things were done back in stone age. Engineered joists never will look right to me, even though my head knows they work well.
--
aem sends...


Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/17/2011 8:11 PM, aemeijers wrote:

Garage is 28 x 32. Custom built 12/12 pitch roof trusses for attic are rated for it to be a full live load bearing floor. No beam needed. I'd have to dig up the specs sheet but there are 2x12's at the floor and 2x8's for the roof with all the truss webbing in between. Attic room is 16' wide. I'm about 220lbs and can make the floor shake but I can't make it bounce. ...................... Found the blueprints, from what I can decipher the attic room floor is rated at 40lb/sq'. Just called the truss manufacture to double check, they will get back to me.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Typically second floors are designed with a 30#/SF live load, so the 40# is a point in your favor, as is the no-bounce test, though that might change once the room is loaded and occupied. You mentioned putting a shop up there, right? What sort of shop and what are the heaviest items?
R
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/19/2011 1:00 PM, RicodJour wrote:

A wood shop, nothing too heavy because none of my tools are that good. :-( Although I would still put the heaviest items along the side walls and light stuff in the middle of the room.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Andy comments: If I didn't want to spend the money, and were willing to invest a half day, I'd nail some 2x4s together to build a two rail ramp, about 45 deg, and slide the dry wall up one at a time. Then I'd pull out the nails and use the 2x4s for any framing that needed to be done......
That could be done in much less time than would be taken for the trip to Home Depot (or wherever) to get special equipment and take it back....
I'm pretty sure that's how they built the pyramids......
Andy in Eureka, Texas
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

BTDT, exactly how we hoisted 30' wide trusses to a second floor location. Two people, one pushing, one on the header plate, C-clamps as safety stops on the 45 degree ramps, and a decent length of rope and ten of the trusses were stacked in place in a couple of hours. In a nearby development there were three guys working with a boom truck all morning. They had more $$ to spend, I guess.
Joe Joe
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.