Generator Inlet

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On my new house I had the electrician install a generator panel. He also put an inlet connector outside the house. This connector is a 4 pin female connector in a box with a hinged cover. Shouldn't this be a male connector? So that you don't have a male to male cord leading to the possibility of a hot male connector. Does anyone know what the NEC says about this? Or any other comments? Thanks.
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You are correct, It should be a flanged inlet, which is male. The female cord body from the generator plugs onto it
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on 12/9/2009 10:38 PM (ET) RBM wrote the following:

outlet. Generators do not come with the power cords, you have to make/have made a power cord with both ends male, as I have had made by a licensed union electrician..

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wrote Re Re: Generator Inlet:

Good advice. What do they charge for that in your area?
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Transfer kits sold are Male in exterior box or panel so you dont plug in the cord and kill yourself in the dark with a hot open male plug. 220v 30a and you dont live long. Look online at what is sold standard.
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willshak wrote:

Not so. The input to an emergency transfer switch is male. This allows connection via a normal extension cable.
Here's an example: http://www.steadypower.com/catalog/product_info.php?products_id 24
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*The feed to the house electrical panel or transfer switch is connected to an inlet (Male) normally. You connect the female part of a cord from the generator to the male inlet. A male to male connection is dangerous.
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John Grabowski wrote:

In more ways than one. (Not there's anything wrong with that.)
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On 12/10/2009 12:16, willshak wrote:

should always be male and the mating cord should of course have the same series female cord connector.
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He's talking about an inlet (male). You changed the subject from inlet to outlet.
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The thing on the generator, which is female, is an outlet, probably twist lok. The thing that "should" be on the house is an inlet, which is male. There should NEVER be two male ends on a line voltage extension cord, and if yours was built by a "licensed electrician", he's either seriously ignorant, or seriously stupid, or both
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Then, as an electrician that was trained by the National Joint Apprenticeship Training Committee (NJATC) of the National Electrical Contractors Association (NECA) and the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) I am embarrassed by his work. Double male Cords are never needed, legal, or safe. -- Tom Horne
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I am no electrician and I don't know what the NEC says, and I (like you), am too lazy to look it up. :-) But, I would think that a female inlet is what you want. I wouldn't want any prongs, that could be hot (electrically charged), exposed directly to the elements or where a person/child could get shocked from them it they get touched.
This is just my opinion with no valid experience or knowledge.
I am anxious to hear what others say.
Hank
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wrote:

I am no electrician and I don't know what the NEC says, and I (like you), am too lazy to look it up. :-) But, I would think that a female inlet is what you want. I wouldn't want any prongs, that could be hot (electrically charged), exposed directly to the elements or where a person/child could get shocked from them it they get touched.
This is just my opinion with no valid experience or knowledge.
I am anxious to hear what others say.
Hank
If his receptacle was female, the cord from the generator would have to be male on both ends, which is exactly the dangerous violation you refer to. The receptacle attached to the house (male prongs) is never live, except when powered by the generator, as it's feeding a transfer switch
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RBM wrote:

question. Right now, I disconnected the male receptacle and connected 3 pieces of 12 gauge stranded wire to a plug matching my generator. I did this because I didn't have the 4 pin plug to use with the provided receptacle, power was out and it looked like it was going to be a long one as a blown-over tree knocked down 2 spans of a 5KV line. But .... now I'd like to do it right. I'm seriously thinking of replacing the small box with a slightly larger one and just coil the wire and generator plug inside. Then all you have to do is open the box, pull out the wire and plug it into the generator which would sit 4' away in its running location. Also, I guess I should connect the 4th safety green wire to the generator frame ... not sure how important that is because I'm pretty sure it is already connected to neutral in the genset, but I'd have to check to be sure. Also, the breaker panel, which is, of course earth grounded, is right behind the wall where generator inlet box is mounted.
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Ok, I couldn't stop myself. I went to Home Depot website and searched for an electrical INLET. Found one for $46.50 in a metal box that can be locked. It is MALE. I kinda liked it, I may put one on my barn. So, I guess worrying about someone touching the prongs is moot if the box is locked.
Hank <~~~~hardly ever right the first time
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Since the inlet is one side of the transfer switch, there is zero chance the inlet will ever be energized by line power. Your moot is moot. That felt strange, to write.
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wrote:

Ok, I couldn't stop myself. I went to Home Depot website and searched for an electrical INLET. Found one for $46.50 in a metal box that can be locked. It is MALE. I kinda liked it, I may put one on my barn. So, I guess worrying about someone touching the prongs is moot if the box is locked.
Hank <~~~~hardly ever right the first time
The male prongs of the flanged inlet could only become live (when not being fed by a generator), if you have it directly connected to a circuit breaker panel, which is incorrect. It should only be connected to a transfer switch
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Do you mean "male inlet"?
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