Gas water heater, tank vs tankless

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Answers: yes, no, definitely, and maybe. They take some hefty wiring to run, increasing initial costs, and maybe requiring you to have a heavier service put in. In places where the kitchen or bath is remote, they do good since it takes so much water to prime the lines from the main water heater that a lot is wasted. Good in places such as a small sink where a lot of water is not needed, and they don't keep water hot while you're away. Start by checking power requirements of the units you may need and see if your electrical service will even handle it without some costly upgrades. From there, the questions only start.
Steve
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Again, the decision is between a *gas* tankless vs. a *gas* tank design.
thanks,
Jc
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You should build the 1/2 bath into a full bath so each of you gluttons can have their own bathroom.
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I know I'm going with gas, but I'm just not sure which type of water heater to get.

The small tankless Paloma (propane) in our isolated summer home in northwestern Canada has been in use each May-through-October for twenty-one years. It has easily been able to satisfy the demands of up to eight teenagers taking showers because they take them sequentially (we have only one shower). If it weren't economical to run it would have been removed long ago (getting a tank of propane out to our island involves a forty-mile boat trip). Interestingly enough, there are a couple plumbers on nearby islands, and both ridiculed me when I installed the Paloma (they knew nothing about tankless water heaters, therefore tankless water heaters must be bad). Both spend less time on the lake than we do, both make more frequent trips to town for propane, and both have had to replace their tank-type water heaters at least once in the past twenty years.
Our satisfaction with the Paloma led me to install a slightly larger tankless Bosch/AquaStar (natural gas) in our house in western Canada in 1998 (not as far north as the cottage, but it gets down to -40ēC / -40ēF in winter). The Bosch, too, is capable of supplying hot water indefinitely for sequential showers. Until we sold that house in 2005 my wife kept charts on its gas consumption, and it definitely is economical to run.
The Paloma gets its propane via twenty feet of 1/4" copper tubing from the tank; the Bosch uses six feet of 1/2" iron pipe from the main natural gas line. Neither uses any electricity. The Bosch has the added bonus of no pilot light. Maintenance on both has been zero (other than the Paloma's being drained for winters).
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On Fri, 30 Jan 2009 17:13:56 -0800 (PST), borealbushman

This all is really interesting, but what strikes me is that you seem not to be relying on these for year-round use. I am not sure whether using these in real winters is a good proposition; they seem perfect for your summer use, but do you have anecdotal evidence from people who are using them in the middle of a freezing winter for 6 months on end?
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I have a small Bosch 117000 BTU and it works great with 35f incomming, and I had a 4-5 year payback. Its the ignorant screwballs that cant afford one that Bitch to confirn their superioraty of knowlege and Diss tanlkess for no reason . Tards. Like ......
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On Sat, 31 Jan 2009 15:40:08 -0800 (PST), ransley

You mean "tards" like you that can't spell, ransley? By the way, which is it? Is it a 4 year payback for your or a 5 year payback? Oh, that's right. You dont know because you make all this shit up and pull these numbers out of your ass. Bubba
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The devil to all this is in the details. There is no doubt that tankless can be good solutions for the right application. However, you have to take into account what people are using them for. For example, using tankless in a summer home and taking sequential showers is very different than using on in MN in the winter and expecting to be able to run 2 showers and a washing machine at the same time. Or just stating that it works great with 35 incoming, with no info on what the hot water demands are, doesn't say much either. With 35 deg water, I'm sure you can get a unit that will supply a household of 6, the obvious question is how much it will cost, how much the install will cost, will the existing gas service support it, etc.
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