Gas vs. Electric Dryer

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sorry_no snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (BrianEWilliams) wrote in message

Hi,
Some gas dryer purchase tips...
http://www.appliance411.com/links/jump.cgi?IDB5
Some consumer opinions...
http://www.epinions.com/hmgd-Large_Appliances-All-Dryers-Gas

Not really, same as electric...clean venting every year, clean our dryer every 3-5 years. Venting shoudl be metal for a gas dryer as well.
jeff.
Appliance Repair Aid http://www.applianceaid.com /
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Interesting that your builder is charging extra for the gas line. Is he including a circuit for an electric dryer in for free? I've been offered one or the other at no charge with the 2 houses I've had built. The person who suggested putting in both had a pretty good suggestion. Relatively inexpensive, when you consider the price of your townhouse, the monthly payment you make will change by only pennies, probably.
Keep in mind that if gas prices go up, electric rates may rise right along with them. Many utilities burn natural gas to generate electricity. Some may switch to another fuel if they can, but that fuel would likely rise as well.
That said, when we switched from an electric dryer to natural gas a decade ago, we noticed a several dollar per month drop in our electric bill. Maybe $75 per year. We did not notice much of an increase at all in our gas bill. So call it maybe $65 per year, so total payback in less than 3 years. Your results will vary based on the utility rates in your area. In this area, electricity is relatively inexpensive $0.07 per kwh. and gas is about 77 per therm.
I've had to replace one timer on my electric dryer in the 5 years I've owned it (Kenmore) In the 12 years I've owned 2 gas dryers, both Maytags, no repairs needed. Hardly representative, I know, but that's my experience.
HTH Dave

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The Advantage of a house with all electric appliances instead of gas is that you don't have to run natural gas lines through the home.
For those of you who are safety oriented this can be important if you are concerned about gas building up inside the house and a huge explosion leveling the whole property afterwards. Some apartments and condos don't have any gas at all in the for that very same reason because the risk is greater.
If not in explosion then the residents can get gassed out and killed while they are sleeping. There was a time long ago when lighting fixtures were not electric but has gas coming through them and burned gas to create light. I don't think it's even documented how many people died from being gassed out from the gas itself or from the buildup or carbon dioxide or from being burned.
For those of you who live in earthquake country your better off not having gas if you want to be safe. This is why it is mandatory to know exactly where is the main gas shut off valve for your house so that you can immediately secure your residence by getting a wrench and turning the valve closed so that your house won't explode.
There is one other thing, I don't know if Gas lines can freeze up the way water lines do. You can't know everything and I wish somebody would pitch in on the matter.
Scour the Internet for the situation where a gas main exploded and burned a whole community somewhere in California. There was a situation once where a train derailed at a bedroom community. Two houses were leveled I believe because they were by the tracks that was a sharp turn. (stupid place to build a house in my opinion) Silently underground there was a serious problem being a fracture in the main gas line. Days later after the train derailment the line burst and gas was shot up hundreds of feet into the air. Minutes later the worst imaginable had happened once all of that fuel ignited. It was such a great tragedy indeed and I still remember watching it on a documentary as if it were only yesterday. Some of those poor people who were still alive to talk about it, it was tragic.
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My, what amazing fear-mongering about natural gas. Are you paid by the electric company, or what? Here's a different point of view, from <http://utilities.dteenergy.com/infoZone/safety/gasSafety.html :
The Facts
Natural gas is one of the safest energy sources available to homeowners and businesses alike. By itself, natural gas will not ignite. For ignition to occur, a mixture of gas between four and 14 percent must combine with air. Also, gas must have an ignition source with a temperature of 1,100 degrees Fahrenheit or more before it will ignite.
Because gas is lighter than air, it will rise and disperse. That's why you should open windows and doors if you smell gas.
I suspect that if you research the subject, you will find that more people are injured or killed and more property is damaged as a result of electrical fires than as a result of gas leaks.
You mentioned, without any details, a gas main explosion which "burned a whole community somewhere in California." If that really happened, then sure, it's a terrible tragedy. But the fact that it happened doesn't really prove much about the safety of natural gas, any more than Boston's great molasses flood of 1919 proves anything about the safety of molasses.
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On Tue, 24 Jun 2003 06:25:51 +0000 (UTC) snipped-for-privacy@kamens.brookline.ma.us (Jonathan Kamens) wrote:

Like a pilot light?

If you are there and awake to smell it.

It is harder to outrun an explosion than a fire.

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On Tue, 24 Jun 2003 10:27:07 -0500 Bill Seurer <Bill_AT_seurer.net> wrote:

Huh?
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Albert Wagner wrote:

You don't consider the "odds" when rating personal risk, only spectacular occurances. Fires due to electric heaters are much more common but less spectacular than gas explosions.
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On Tue, 24 Jun 2003 15:43:36 -0500 Bill Seurer <Bill_AT_seurer.net> wrote: <snip>

My point was that escaping a fire is easier than escaping an explosion. Do you have any reliable statistics otherwise?
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One of the neat things about pilot lights and gas leaks is that since the pilot light is always burning, it is always burning off any gas in its vicinity. So no, a pilot light is unlikely to ignite an explosion as a result of a small gas leak.
As for large gas leaks, they just don't happen that often, and as I said before, I'm fairly certain that more people are injured by electricity-related accidents than gas-related accidents.

Irrelevant if the fires happen much more often than the explosions.
I submit that the reason why every pretty much gas leak and explosion is reported in the media is because they happen so rarely.
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On Tue, 24 Jun 2003 15:02:49 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@kamens.brookline.ma.us (Jonathan Kamens) wrote:

Death caused by electricity (both directly via electrocution, and by short-circuit induced fire) is at least several magnitudes more a concern than the dangers involved with natural gas leaks. It's funny how in the earthquake capitol of the USA, Gas is king, by far. Propane is more of a concern than natural gas, being heavier than air.
--
BRENT - The Usenet typo king. :)

Fast Times At Ridgemont High Info http://www.FastTimesAtRidgemontHigh.org
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i looked specifically for a place with natural gas appliances, and heating. in so cal, gas is cheaper than electricity.

my condo was built in 81 and has a gas stove, water heater, clothes dryer, and central heat. i like it. it also meets all earthquake codes and has apparently been thru a few of em since it was built with no damage at all.

might not be documented because it wasnt a big issue. how many gas station fires are documented? i rarely hear of one, yet we all pump flammable liquid fuel in our vehicles regularly.

true. its also nice to be able to shut off your power in case of short circuits, and water in case of ruptured pipes.

shit happens. powerlines fall and kill people too. you work for So Cal edison, doncha?
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On 23 Jun 2003 23:02:52 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Eastward Bound) wrote:

In Rochester, NY, with winter months routinely experiencing long periods of freezing temperatures, gas lines do not freeze up.
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True, but houses do blow up there. 40 years ago a whole street blew up. I don't remember what it was; a big surge in pressure or something like that.
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You know what Mr. Lippman. What you have heard of is by no means an isolated occurrence.
Houses explode from gas leaks all the time.
The biggest gas line danger in a home are the flexible gas lines that connect the clothes dryer to the gas line along with the stove and the water heater that use the flexible connection as well.
DANGEROUS! Here in Cali at least I know that it is illegal for anyone to install a new gas appliance without putting in a new flexible metal gas line.
Also what if nobody is home to smell the gas leak? (Vacation most likely, most home owners are not smart enough to shut off the main gas valve before they leave the house) Then it just keeps building up more and more until all 4 houses the 3 surrounding houses included are blown up.
There was once incident somewhere in North America where an Elderly couple were getting more and more sick and they would sleep for the whole day through and would have to use crutches. They felt tired all the time and would vomit and they didn't know why.
Eventually the house cat (cats have an acute sense of smell) was seen digging in the side of the house. The Lady went up to her cat and noticed that there was a bad odor and a hissing sound from the gas leaking out into the ground.
The gas company came with one of those testers that can sense how strong the gas concentration is and it was off the scale.
That very same couple are a lot better now but are extremely lucky to be alive. They were suffering from the poisoning and their house was filling up with gas without them knowing. They are lucky that they didn't quite literally blow up.
Sure there is a danger using electric appliances as well. The difference is when you introduce gas appliances into the house, you and your loved ones are now more at risk. Every house would have electricity anyway. Having a gas appliance only adds more risks along with a lot more things that can go wrong.
Remember, "What ever can go wrong will go wrong." Murphys law...
I'm not trying to by like Ralph Nader here going overboard. I'm just saying that now that I am aware of all of the possible dangers involved and the smart thing to do would be to make wise decisions to keep you and your loved ones safe. Wouldn't you want to keep your loved ones safe? There is nothing worse then a parent outliving a child.
If for whatever impossible reason I were forced to use gas appliances I would have them all inspected annually and would replace all the flexible gas lines every year. Now if you had to inspect all of your gas equipment and infrastructure annually how is that more frugal then just using the more maintenance free electric appliances in the first place?
A burn victim from flash burnings can be the most tragic accidents to live through. I have seen burn victims and it is not pretty seeing them like that uncomfortable no matter what they do. They don't even look human anymore. Being a burn victim is no different then loosing your hearing, loosing your vision or becoming a cripple. It's sad, it's tragic and it's most unfortunate. The worst part about it is that it would have been avoided if only one took the necessary precautions.
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Eastward Bound wrote:

No they don't. Where do you get crap like this?
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On Tue, 24 Jun 2003 16:16:12 -0500, Bill Seurer <Bill_AT_seurer.net> wrote:

Search www.cnn.com for 'gas leak house explode' found over 5000 hits. Here are 3 examples...    
http://wcpo.com/news/butlerwarren/oct232002.html
http://www.eagletribune.com/news/stories/19990225/LN_002.htm
http://www.angelfire.com/ri2/fires/page3.html
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n.o@spam writes:

First of all, when you type a query into the search box on the www.cnn.com home page and click Search, you aren't actually searching www.cnn.com, you're searching the entire Web. Notice that there are two radio buttons next to the search box with the words "The Web" and "CNN.com" next to them and the one that's checked by default is "The Web".
Second, when you search for "gas leak house explode" you're telling Google to find pages that match *any* of those words, not pages that match *all* of them.
Third, since you're searching the entire Web, you're finding many pages reporting on the same events, and many other pages talking about the topic without actually mentioning specific events.
If you go to www.cnn.com, select the "CNN.com" search rather than searching "The Web", and search for "gas leak house explode", you find only three matches, which is not quite the same as "over 5000". If you search for "gas leak house explosion" instead, you find 68 matches. In contrast, if you search for "electrical fire house", you find 468 matches.
I'm not trying to claim that any of this is particularly scientific; I'm merely trying to illustrate that your "over 5000" citation is completely bogus.
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n.o@spam wrote: ...

....
Try a search for 'electric dryer fire' and you'll get 80,000 hits. Try a search for 'flying saucers abduct cheerleader' and you'll still get at least 2 hits.
Can houses with natural gas appliances explode? Yes. Does it happen very often? No. Can houses with electrical appliances burn down and kill everyone? Yes. Does it happen very often? More often than gas leak explosions.
If one were really concerned with the safety aspect of natural gas then it would be appropriate to get the correct explosive gas and carbon monoxide alarms installed. These are common in RV's.
Anthony
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On Tue, 24 Jun 2003 22:11:52 -0400, n.o@spam wrote:

So did searching for 'gas leak house not explode'... perhaps you need to refine your searching technique.
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I think a beer powered dryer is safer unless you think its to volitale
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