Garden hose connection to plastic bin


I have a drip line from Air conditioner that creates a puddy of water where the kids play. I would like to take a plastic container, cut a hole near the side and create a seal to an attached garden hose that leads to a drain.
What cheap items can I use to fit a garden hose fitting to the side of the plastic bin so it won't leak?
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At home depot they have fittings that convert hose fittings to iron pipe fittings maybe you can find something in the 3/4 pvc section to create a seal.

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Take a trip to the hardware store and look at garden hose repair couplings. I'm thinking you can put one through a hole in the container and screw half of it on the inside to hold it in place. Seal with silicone and enjoy a dry summer for less than $5. .
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Use a bulkhead fitting from a boat store and attach the hose with a clamp.
If you have a thicker plastic barrel you can actually tap threads in it with a metal pipe then screw in a plastic fitting. (no rust)
Glue in a fitting with silicone
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On Sat, 24 Apr 2010 23:42:32 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

A bulkhead is also used in ponds and garden water features. A local shop would likely carry them.
This guy made his own with some parts from the electrical section.
_An Improvised PVC Bulkhead Fitting for Liquid Storage Tanks_
pics:
http://www.truetex.com/bulkhead.htm
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Ziggs wrote:

There should be a condensate line from the evaporator unit to your house plumbing. The drip you see is the emergency overflow line and indicates the primary line is obstructed (usually with algae).
Eventually, this backup line, too, will become obstructed and the condensate will overflow the collection pan onto your ceiling, ruining the sheetrock and causing, potentially, hundreds of dollars in damage.
Fortunately, when you see the outside condensate line dripping, the fix is simple:
Find the primary condensate discharge line and relieve the obstruction - compressed air, a long stick or wire, whatever. Then pour a cup of bleach in the evaporator unit to kill the remaining algae.
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HeyBub wrote:

OP didn't say where the AC was. I assumed he was talking about a window unit, since I have never seen a basement AC drip line go any place but sump pit. In this part of country, attic-mounted AC is rather uncommon, but I know they like them down south for some reason. If this is down in the basement, and it just drips on the floor, it was a cheap install job, or furnace was too far from sump pit. My furnace has one of those little 110-powered pumps that raises the outflow back up to ceiling level, and then over to the regular drain collector on wall that the washing machine uses. (I don't have a sump pump, and the pit has cobwebs in it. )
--
aem sends...


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wrote:

No basements? Also when you get as far south as me we don't really have a furnace, just A/C with toaster wire heat strips for the 2-3 days a year you turn the heat on. The attic mount is becoming less popular, with the A/H ending up in a closet or hanging from the ceiling in the garage.
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aemeijers wrote:

Ah, good point. We don't have basements in my part of the South (here it's clay for the first 500 feet). So I'll amend my advice to include: "If your evaporator unit is in the attic..."
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Ziggs wrote:

Would it work to dig a hole, put in some gravel and a box with a grate? Rigging a plastic container to a garden hose doesn't sound like an attractive long-term solution. Area and distance for the problem would be helpful....changing the grade slightly might also help. Or, fashion a mini-French drain by connecting the outlet from the AC to a buried, perforated length of pvc with gravel surrounding it?
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On Sun, 25 Apr 2010 08:32:52 -0400, " snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net"

The furnace/AC is within a closet in the house. I dont know of a primary line. The pcv piping in question comes out to my side yard which is all concrete. I can't run pcv pipe to the end of the concrete since it's about 25 feet away and goes uphill. Yes, the hose is not attactive, but is the cheapest way without grinding the concrete to create a path towards the closest drain that's around 10 feet away.
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