Garage heater - low temps

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On Wed, 11 Nov 2015 15:56:00 -0800 (PST), trader_4

If the original post is from 07, why even bother posting help? That did not show up on the original post here, or I would not even have bothered to reply.
As far as the guy calling others idiots, why dont you use facebook instead of alt.home.repair. Facebook is loaded with people with your lousy attitude.... You can find all kinds of new idiot friends on Facebook to annoy!
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On Wednesday, November 11, 2015 at 7:24:03 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moc wrote:

The OP is from 07, but Gerry revived it on Nov 10 by voicing a need for a device/system to keep his garage just above freezing.
We're tying to help Gerry, not the OP.

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On Thu, 12 Nov 2015 05:58:54 -0800 (PST), trader_4

Gerry probably dont even have a garage. All he did was waste bandwidth by reposting something from 2007.
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Gerry wrote: ...

think of it in terms of thermal mass, wind and insulation, a well insulated building might be able to maintain a near freezing temperature with a small heater, but if you set it too close to freezing and the temperature and wind changes then it can easily go below freezing and the small heater won't be able to keep up.
most electric heaters i've seen have an adjustable dial that has no specific heat number it's just dots.
the few i have here have Hi, Low and Fan settings.
i'd get a few of them, set them around the building and then adjust them so that one will work at the higher temperature and then set another at a bit lower so you have an extra cushion for when it gets really cold. the one lower unit will run more and then the other should only come on when the weather and wind get particularly cold.
songbird
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wrote:

Why not just use the device that is "made for the job" The ThermoCube is made to control a 1500 watt heater to prevent freezing. On at 35F, off at 45F. If you want to work in the shop, unplug the heater from the thermocube and plug it in directly, letting the built-in thermostat do it's job.
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On Wed, 11 Nov 2015 15:39:31 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Don't use a heater larger than specified power rating.
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On 11/10/2015 8:44 PM, Gerry wrote:

Perhaps this one?
Dayton 1UHG6 Line Voltage Control, LCD , Outlet Plug
Line Voltage Control, Outlet Plug Thermostat Control Range 41-95 F, Differential +/- 1 Deg F, Temp Sensitivity +/- 1 Deg F, Sensor Type NTC Thermistor, For Use With Portable Heaters, Application Heating Only, LCD Display
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
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IF it was my problem, I would take the thermostat apart and adjust/bend something associated with the temperature sensor. Nothing to lose and maybe a lot to save/gain.
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On Tuesday, October 30, 2007 at 2:57:12 PM UTC-4, Mark wrote:

my best friend put a engine heater on his vehicle, with a heavy duty timer turning the heater on at 4am so his vehicle would be always ready to go at 6am for work.
perhaps the OP wanted his vehicle above freezing?
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