Garage heater - low temps

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I have an insulated garage that I want to heat, but just above freezing. All the heaters I have will keep the temperature at 14C (57F) or higher, which I don't want. I just want it slightly above 0C (32F) to avoid the objects in the garage from freezing.
Does anyone know of such a heater? I can't seem to find one.
Thanks!
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Any heater can do that. You need a low working thermostat to control it. Hard to find, but I've seen some that go down to 45. I've never seen lower but that does not mean they don't exist.
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That's easy...
Put a refrigerator in the garage and leave it open. The interior temperature of a fridge should be around 40 degrees, so an open fridge should keep the garage at 40 degrees year round.
QED :-)
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It's a little expensive ($48) but McMaster-Carr has one that you can plug any heater up to 1500 watts into. Go to www.mcmaster.com and search for part number 1940K8.
A bigger issue might be the capability of the heater to maintain the temperature. Unless the garage is *really* well-insulated, and free of significant air leaks (most garage doors leak like a sieve), the heater may have a hard time keeping up when the weather gets really cold. Depending of course on how cold it gets in your area!
Eric Law

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How about a Thermo-Cube?
Nick
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http://www.greenhousecatalog.com/portable-electric-heater-p-38.html ?
-jeepers
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to get you started, here's a thermostat Grainger Item # 2E552 search: http://www.grainger.com
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Hook ANY heater to a timer?
Steve
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If it's an electric heater, make sure the timer can handle such a load. If it's a gas heater, use a setback thermostat?
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hook any electric heater to a cal stat thermostat, use a relay if necessary for higher current
http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/wwg/productIndex.shtml?L2l-Stat&operator=prodIndexRefinementSearch&originalValuelstat+thermostat&L1=Thermostats%2C
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/wwg/productIndex.shtml?L2l-Stat&operator=prodIndexRefinementSearch&originalValuelstat+thermostat&L1=Thermostats%2C More suitable is probably the freeze-protection thermostat
<http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/wwg/productIndex.shtml?L2=Freeze+Protection&operator=prodIndexRefinementSearch&originalValue=thermostat&L1=Thermostats%2C>
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Thanks
This one covers the range I need 40 to 99 degrees, the stores just dont sell 40 degree thermostats.
http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/items/4EY30
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This may meet the OP temperature specs, but it won't meet his other requirements. The specs at the site say: "For Use With Gas, 24V Electric Heat, Oil".
The OP is looking for a stand alone heater or a control for a standalone heater that can be set for low temps, not a thermostat for a furnace.
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A heater on a timer can't maintain a given temperature unless the outside temp is constant and you know the heat loss rate of the garage. If it's 40 one day and -5 the next, how would a timer help maintain a 33 degree temp?
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Look at electric baseboard heaters. These are normally supplied from 240 V, so you can get several kW of heat from ordinary 14 ga wiring.
Most makes of baseboard heaters seem to have auxiliary thermostats that you can install inside the wiring box at one end of the baseboard unit, with the temperature-setting knob sticking out through some kind of knockout. If you look closely, you'll probably find that there are two different models of this thermostat offered. One model has an "off" position, allowing you to turn off the heater entirely. The other model does not have an "off" position, and it's deliberately calibrated so that if you set it to the minimum temperature, it will come on about 4 degrees C (about 39 degrees F). That's what you want.
    Dave
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I've been looking for a 40F degree thermostat for 10 years now, let me know if you find one. I have a boiler that heats the garage slab and the basement slab, and like you I want to keep the garage just above freezing, currently I have to keep it 55F.
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RickH wrote: ...

I posted a link to one at Grainger yesterday in response to haller's posting.
--
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The other poster's suggestion of taking a good look at a few makes of line-voltage thermostats for electric heat is a good one.
Over thirty years ago, we found that some thermostats start at around 50F with an offswitch, and others don't have an offswitch, and start around 36F.
We wanted the 36F ones to keep a cottage just above freezing.
--
Chris Lewis,

Age and Treachery will Triumph over Youth and Skill
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On Oct 31, 9:34 pm, snipped-for-privacy@nortelnetworks.com (Chris Lewis) wrote:

In reading some of the questions that get sent to the Home Repair section of our local newspaper, I think I recall something about issues with condensation if the temperature is kept below some magic number (50?).
You know..."I'm going to Florida for 3 months. What's the lowest I can set my thermostat to?"
I don't recall that the answers started with a "3". I'm sure it was much higher - and it wasn't related to the minimum allowed by the thermostat. It was related to actual environmental factors.
Can anybody concur with what I think I remember?
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DerbyDad03 wrote:

Would depend on the structure and ambient conditions of the location more than just the temperature as to what would/wouldn't be a problem. Here (SW KS) there's no problem from a condensation standpoint in a totally unheated shop area. In a humid area, not so much.
Don't believe there's a single right answer (in fact I'm sure there's not) for all situations, but can see something like 50F being ok as a generic answer that would cover most situations that a generic column of the sort would respond with. That's not the same thing as what any individual shop could use a safe minimum by any stretch.
--
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