Frugal dehumidification

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Their instruments do.
Nick
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snipped-for-privacy@ece.villanova.edu wrote:

All across the region that NREL classifies as Humid-Semitropical, the number of weeks varies with each location, but the number of weeks where outdoor humidity is LOWER than indoor humidity is small, maybe 3 maybe 6 maybe 12.
We live in these areas and we know when it is OK to open the doors and windows to let large quantities of outside air in.
Ventilation dampers work well in some climates, less well in others. Heat pumps work well in some climates, less so in others. geothermal heat pumps work well in areas that have winters, not so good here in Houston TX After talking to a well driller who has assisted with installation of geothermal heat pumps and has made repairs to wells drilled for geothermal heat pumps, he has come to the conclusion that here, we need a river, large lake, or a simple leaky evaporation pond to displose of the hot water out of the geothermal heat pump.
One size does not fit all, not even close. So Nick solution will work OUTSIDE the Deep South and the Desert Southwest.
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Would you have any evidence for this your present vague article of faith?
The average humidity ratio is less than 0.0092 pounds of water per pound of dry air from October through April in Macon. How many weeks is that in your little ol' Texas town? :-)
Nick
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talking about.
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digitalmaster wrote:

Nick is sitting at a balmy 72F while I am at 93F, Macon is 90F, Mobile is 88F, Atlanta is 89F
Nick and Mobile are tied for highest humidity at about 55% currently, the rest of us are in the 30% to 45% range.
Nick is like many in a university setting, they are isolated from the rest of the world and have little idea what problems are being faced elsewhere. And like many in an ivory tower setting, it is difficult for them to believe that anyone knows more than they do. Nick has shown this to us with nearly EVERY comment he makes. No one is infallible, everyone makes some mistakes from time to time, yet Nick appears to want to SMASH your face in with nearly every comment.
The message to Nick is that the world is NOT a copy of what he sees in Pennsylvania, things that will work well in Villanova may not work even in upstate NY (i.e Buffalo)
And for Nick's benefit, ALL the cities mentioned here have very high humidities at night in particular. Residents will avoid bringing in night time air if at all possible as that time is when the RH climbs towards saturation (80-100%)
My parent's house in North Carolina was far enough into the hills that after 10PM, the air temp and humidity dropped off enough that a whole house fan could dump alot of excess heat outside
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Exactly what does that mean, and is it true, and how is it relevant?
We're discussing ABSOLUTE vs relative humidity.
Nick
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snipped-for-privacy@ece.villanova.edu wrote:

what the intruments are telling us. All reporting on TV, Radio, Internet, its ALL RH
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You might enjoy learning the difference.

Whaddya mean "WE," Kemosabe?
Nick
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snipped-for-privacy@ece.villanova.edu wrote:

see http://apollo.lsc.vsc.edu/classes/met130/notes/chapter5/expand_parcel.html
This says that absolute humidity is NOT a good moisture variable even though the amount of moisture is constant as a given volume of air rises This is a useful tool only to calculate how much water is in the air at any given time and as that water rises towards the stratosphere, how likely are clouds to form and rain to fall.
http://members.tripod.com/running4fun/run/humidity.html
This page is written by a Meteorologist. He gives a good explanation of the problem and points out that RH without Dew Point temp is half a loaf.
For instance, right now in Houston Temp 73F RH is 87% Dew Point is 69F
Right now in Villanova Temp 59F RH 88% Dew Point is 56F
I do not imagine that you want to introduce this moisture laden air into your apartment/home if you can help it. Doesn't matter whether we talk Deep South or Pennsylvania. And in no case, do you want 90+F air in any significant quantity coming inside to increase your A/C bill.
The Meteorologist points out that the highest dew point ever recorded in his location was 88F right after a thunderstorm. Other than that, on very humid days, the dew point only gets to the low 80s there (Cincinatti) although Gulf War vets do know 90/90 days as the Red Sea heats to above 90 F and with air temps in Kuwait rising to 110 or higher lots of water is in the air. 90% RH with air temps above 90F is a very very real situation for that location.
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http://apollo.lsc.vsc.edu/classes/met130/notes/chapter5/expand_parcel.html

But it's quite useful for house ventilation control. So's the dew point, but that's harder to measure with electronic sensors.
Nick
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