Front loading washing machines

Page 2 of 2  


Interesting, a safety device that can kill you.
When my kids were playing hide and seek one day, my son got stuck in the washing machine, a top loader. The tub shifted on him and he could not get out. Laughable now, but it was not at the time.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
we've had the kenmore stackable front loaders for near a year now.. I'll never go back to a top loader. the washer and dryer both are much more efficient. Of course, we make sure there are no kids inside when we use them.. geesh!!

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
check that.. ours is a whirlpool

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

When did the first front loaders come out? I recall my mother replacing the old wringer washer with a Bendix front load about 1950 or so.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

"builder installed." I recall that it was bolted to the floor in a corner of the kitchen, and when it went into its wringer cycle at the end it shook the room -- that's why it was bolted to the floor I guess. My mother loved it; her first automatic washing machine.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Comical, isn't it.
The newest "innovations" are often rehashed ideas.
The front loaders were just abandoned by the manufacturers in the 60's when you were supposed to "live better electricly" with all new power sucking toys, right down to having electrical swizzle sticks.
People wanted lots of clean water to wash with, and front loaders wouldn't hold as much as top loaders.
Electricity and water was cheap, we were all going to own "flying cars" and the only talk of ozone was at the amusement park where the bumper cars were.
Sigh ! Am I just getting old ?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed 17 Aug 2005 07:25:44p, Edwin Pawlowski wrote in alt.home.repair:

Bendix held patents for front loaders at least as early as the mid-1930s, but production was virtually non-existent during WWII. It wasn't until after the war that production and sales of automatic home laundry equipment grew dramatically. The Westinghouse Laudromat was a major competitor beginning in the mid-1940s.
--
Wayne Boatwright **
____________________________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed 17 Aug 2005 07:25:44p, Edwin Pawlowski wrote in alt.home.repair:

Ed, you might enjoy this site. Lot's of vintage stuff and restorations.
--
Wayne Boatwright **
____________________________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat 27 Aug 2005 01:50:00a, Wayne Boatwright wrote in alt.home.repair:

Oops, sorry, Ed.
http://automaticwasher.org /
--
Wayne Boatwright **
____________________________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 27 Aug 2005 15:42:19 +0200, Wayne Boatwright

The 1938 Bendix looks pretty much like the one my mother had in 1947. Not exactly the same if my memory serves (I was 5 years old) but very close. Round, tube-like machine with a short base.
I think there were no metal panels on the sides, however, just a front panel and it may have not been black. Looked very industrial, with bolts and frame showing, although I doubt this was a design feature in 1947. Maybe to save on scarce metal right after the big wartime demand.
You poured detergent in the hole in the top. I'm pretty sure the machine was bolted to the kitchen floor. You had to bend over almost to the floor to open the door and put in clothing. No dryers in those days at our house, but the house came from the builder with a clothesline in the back yard and the washer installed.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat 27 Aug 2005 10:04:13a, Tom Miller wrote in alt.home.repair:

Like this one, Tom?
http://www.automaticwasher.org/FUN/1938Bendix.jpg
--
Wayne Boatwright **
____________________________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 28 Aug 2005 09:19:31 +0200, Wayne Boatwright

Yeah, that's the one I was referring to.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun 28 Aug 2005 09:28:29a, Tom Miller wrote in alt.home.repair:

That's a really neat old machine! When our washing machine died, I can remember going a couple of times with my mom to a laundromat where they had a row of those machines.
Another interesting oldie... Back in the 1930s and 40s many large apartment buldings had "drying rooms" adjacent to the room where similar washers were installed. Clothes were hung on lines in traditional fashion, then the room was closed and hot air was pumped into the room until the clothes were dry.
--
Wayne Boatwright **
____________________________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
david wrote:

Actually I understand the newer dryers are no more efficient than the old ones, but the front loaders spin at a higher speed and the clothes come drier to start with so the dryer does not need to work as hard.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes, it's true generally, but I had a Hitachi top-loader washing machine that spun as fast as today's front loaders. When it died after 17 years, I got a Maytag Atlantis top-loader and was quite disappointed with the spin speed, clothes comes out much wetter than with the Hitachi. Can't get a front-loader though, not enough space in front to open a door.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
FH wrote:

The front loaders (in laundromats anyway) have more rinse cycles than top loaders, so I think maybe they get the dirty soap out better.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
We have a Maytag Neptune front loader and it does do a better job cleaning, holds a ton of laundry ( three boys under ten) . It is gentler on clothes than any top loader we've had including Maytag . However we have noticed black mold growing on the door seal and treat it regularly with Sol-u-mel to control it. Having said this we just received notice of a class action lawsuit against Maytag as a result of mold, defective motors ( had ours replaced with a new and better motor under warranty) and defective door latches.This may or may not influence your decision on Maytag but front loaders are definitely worth the extra price in our opinion
regards dave

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.