freon

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Deodiaus wrote:

No.
The "pool" of water under the evaporating unit is the "emergency overflow" pan. Water there means your regular drain is clogged.
The clog is almost always a mass of algae. It can be blown out with a good puff of wind (or compressed air or a water hose or etc.). Once draining again properly, add a cup of bleach to the evaporator system (where the internal puddle is) to kill off the remaining algae.
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On Mon, 28 May 2012 20:31:18 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"

Not true - if the system is full of butane there is no air and the butane cannot explode.

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On May 28, 8:50 pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

What about ammonia?
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Either you're a troll or a complete idiot.
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wrote:

In the late 80s I was renting a house that had this kind of AC system.
http://www.gasairconditioning.org/robur_how_it_works.htm
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wrote:

Just like a lot of camper or motor-home refrigerators.
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On May 29, 7:53 pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Well, I'd never heard of such a thing back then, and haven't seen one since. It also didn't cool very well.
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wrote:

I have an absorbtion fridge in my garage. I got it from a guy who used to run a snack bar boat and got out of the business. It runs on propane or 120VAC
I keep it for hurricanes when the power might be out.
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wrote:

Where electricity is not available, expensive, or unreliable propane, butane, and parafin powered absorption refrigerators are still in everyday use, and they work very well. (if properly set up)
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http://www.iiar.org/aar/aar_greenpaper.pdf
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Apparently you and the previous poster don't realize there is a big difference between using ammonia or natural gas in a system DESIGNED for it and putting it into your home AC system which was not. Your question is about putting everything from auto R134 to ammonia into your present home AC. And apparently ammonia isn't practical for such systems today compared to the other refrigerants or HVAC manufacturers would be using it.
So, again, either you're an idiot or a troll.
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wrote:

Ummmmm, yes I do. Was just making a comment that ammonia is used in natural gas systems.
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As usual, we have one idiot chiming in with another. WTF does the fact that ammonia was once a long time ago in refrigerators have to do with the idiot's question about putting R134 or ammonia or God know's what else into his present home AC system?
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What was the recommended refrigerant for the York heat pump? R22? What do they use now, or do they still use R22 for those models?
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You'd have to check the name plate. Probably R-22 back then. Now, more likely R-410a.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
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What was the recommended refrigerant for the York heat pump? R22? What do they use now, or do they still use R22 for those models?
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On Mon, 28 May 2012 08:46:07 -0700 (PDT), Deodiaus

Freon is a trade name for a particular brand (DuPont) of refrigerant. Without more information as that what you want to achieve, no one can give the proper answer. Surely, just because it is termed "oil" there are some that would not be good in your salad dressing.
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On 5/28/2012 10:46 AM, Deodiaus wrote:

Oh, certainly there's bound to have been somebody who has and it may even have functioned (sorta') for a while.
The proper answer is almost assuredly you can't do what you're asking as the automotive and home central-air systems do not use compatible refrigerants.
As for what's on the web, who knows? There's undoubtedly something out there that is ok, but I've no clue where it might be.
For starters, though, you need to know what is in the target system and then see what are current compatible replacements for that particular one or whether it is still available, perhaps (afaik, there's no problem in servicing existing systems w/ the original even yet other than perhaps availability).
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Freon is a brand name, like Sunoco, or Sue Bee Honey. The fact that it's been improperly used for decades doesn't change that fact.
That said, refrigerant 134a has a whole different pressure, temperature relationship. And different heat carrying capacity. If it works at all, in a R-22 system, it won't work well.
Of course, I do need to note, that's a federal crime to do so, under EPA section 608.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Has anyone tried using the freon that you buy for a car AC system in a home centralized AC system? Are there any reliable discussions about this topic on the web. I see some, but don't know who to believe.
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wrote:

But the Toyota NEVER used R22. It used R12 - and 134A is the replacement for R12. It is close enough to work well in MOST R12 systems.
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wrote:

R134 is a replacement for R12, different thing
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